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Old 03-01-2010, 02:23 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by CookLikeJulia View Post
The best for chicken curry is the coconut milk instead of milk . Very yummy if you use coconut milk , Believe me
like i said there r countless chicken curry recipes,and yes there ARE those that use coconut milk,but this one doesnt!its the traditional authentic chicken korma recipe that does not use coconut milk,well anyone can change recipes according to their taste,but then it wont be the same...
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Old 03-01-2010, 05:57 AM   #12
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Sarah,

I don't see anywhere in your recipe that you either strain out the whole spices or grind them up. Do you just leave them in whole? How do you eat around them, then? Whole cinnamon sticks and cardamom pods would be kind of interesting to chew on. Just wondering if a step was left out. Otherwise, the recipe looks great! Most Indian recipes that I know (now, I'm a fan and love to cook it at home, but am not Indian), have the spices roasted in a dry pan, then ground before actually using. I've never seen them left in whole, so it just seems odd to me, that's all. Thanks!
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Old 03-01-2010, 12:07 PM   #13
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I spent part of my childhood in East Africa where there was a substantial Indian culture. This is an adaptation of the Chicken Curry recipe my mother learned from them and the British women of the area. It remains a favorite in our family and lends itself to so many variations.
The BEST part of it for me is the condiments and I strongly encourage you to try at least 5 of them on your curry. The peanuts, the coconut, the bananas etc., all add such a unique flavor and texture to the dish.

Chicken Curry (Serves 8)

4 whole bone-in chicken breasts (about 3.25 lbs) split
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1 can (13.75 oz) chicken broth

CURRY SAUCE

3 TB. Butter or margarine
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 cup chopped onion
2-3 teaspoons curry powder (your choice medium to hot)
1 cup chopped pared apple
1/4 cup unsifted all purpose flour
1/2 tsp. ground cardamom (don't leave this out!)
1 tsp. ground ginger
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp pepper2 tsp. grated lime peel
2 TB. lime juice
1/4 c. Major Gray mango chutney, chopped

Skin the chicken and wipe dry. Brown chicken, a few pieces at a time, in 1/4 cup hot butter,
about 5 minutes each side.

Return all chicken to the skillet, add the chicken broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat
and simmer, covered for 20 minutes, or until tender.

Remove chicken pieces and keep warm. Measure the liquid in the skillet, add water to
make 3 cups and set aside.

Make the sauce. Put the 3 TB. butter in the skillet and heat. Add garlic, onion, curry powder and apple
and saute until onion is tender.

Remove from heat and stir in flour, cardamom, ginger, salt and pepper. Mix well.

Gradually stir in reserved liquid, lime peel and lime juice.

Bring to a boil, stirring. Reduce heat and simmer covered for about 20 minutes,
stirring once in a while.

Add back the cooked chicken and chutney and heat just to boiling.

Serve with basmati or saffron rice and curry accompaniments.

Curry Accompaniments to set on the
table for sprinkling on the chicken dish. They add
a lot of different and interesting flavors to the curry.

Chopped bananas, dipped in lemon juice
Chutney
Whole salted peanuts
Flaked Coconut
Yogurt
Sliced Green onions
chopped cucumber
Raisins
Chopped tomatoes
Pineapple chunks
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Old 03-01-2010, 12:45 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
Sarah,

I don't see anywhere in your recipe that you either strain out the whole spices or grind them up. Do you just leave them in whole? How do you eat around them, then? Whole cinnamon sticks and cardamom pods would be kind of interesting to chew on. Just wondering if a step was left out. Otherwise, the recipe looks great! Most Indian recipes that I know (now, I'm a fan and love to cook it at home, but am not Indian), have the spices roasted in a dry pan, then ground before actually using. I've never seen them left in whole, so it just seems odd to me, that's all. Thanks!
Velochic! its not unusual to sometimes leave the spices whole and not strain or grind them up,in Indian and other Asian recipes,e.g Pakistan,Sri lanka,Bangladesh,etc...ground spices have different flavor and aroma and whole spices add a totally different effect(i'm not saying grinding them makes them loose the flavor,but its just different.On the other hand,there r recipes that use only ground spices and not the whole ones.it really just depends on the recipe).If you've had indian biryani or meat pilafs,they have whole spices too.You just leave them in the dish like that,they keep releasing their heavenly aroma,and if you find a cardamom pod or a cinnamon stick in your plate,just keep it aside.Dont chew on it.
Secondly u either roast spices in a separate pan and them add them in the dish or you fry them in the oil and continue in the same pan.Both techniques r known and accurate.i'm talking in general,not particularly about this very recipe.
I hope this answers your question.
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Old 03-02-2010, 06:13 AM   #15
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add potatoes or yam to the curry it will be good
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Old 03-02-2010, 08:42 AM   #16
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Thanks Sarah, I didn't know that.
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Old 03-03-2010, 06:33 PM   #17
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I have added butter lima beans and even chick peas or white beans. They are so neutral and they add enhanced texture.
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Old 03-04-2010, 09:57 AM   #18
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There are a lot of variations of chicken curry:

HYDERABADI CHICKEN CURRY
ANDHRA CHICKEN CURRY
HONEY CURRY CHICKEN
PUNJABI CHICKEN CURRY
and a lot more.



Happy Cooking!
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Old 03-04-2010, 01:16 PM   #19
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I am not going to post a specific recipe for chicken curry because there are probably 1000's available on the internet.

The one thing to keep in mind when cooking any curry dish is that the spices in Indian cuisine don't vary greatly. What I mean is that the basic corrainder, cumin, chillies, turmeric, ginger, garlic, onions and garam masala (mostly a mix of warm spices like cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, black pepper, nutmeg, etc.) are used in most recipes. Some use whole to infuse the oil with the flavor, some use ground etc.

The thing that will change the flavor drastically is the base. You can make a curry with tomatoes and onions, yogurt, cream, coconut milk, ground nuts, tamarind pulp, spinach puree etc.

If you want to look up recipes here are a few to look up based on the base they use:

Butter Chicken - Uses Cream and ground nuts
Chicken Achari - Uses yogurt
Chicken Korma - Uses tomato but can also have yogurt added to it or some people also make it with coconut milk
Chicken Vindaloo - Uses tamarind
Chicken Saagwala - Uses spinach puree as the base

After you figure out the base, you can add whatever else you want to it
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Old 03-11-2010, 03:13 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by sarah View Post
traditionally in this particular dish chicken pieces r supposed to be large in size and they should be very tender and well-done,but yes you can offcourse make them small,according to your liking...
Yeah its depend upon to you if you like small then ok , if you big then okay too . It doesnt matter its your art. Cooking is an art.
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