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Old 07-16-2010, 01:22 PM   #1
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Chicken stock

A lot of recipes mention the chicken stock, I know it's possible to cook them but I'm more comfortable with the Knorr cubes for stocks. I don't know how many cubes I should add to 1l water to achieve the actual flavor...

Thanks

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Old 07-16-2010, 01:33 PM   #2
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According to the Knorr website, one cube to 500ml of water. Are instructions not printed on the box?
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Old 07-16-2010, 02:17 PM   #3
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This time I didn't buy the usual box, maybe that's the reason. I checked Knorr's website too but I didn't find it. Next time I'll be more careful reading.
Thanks a lot Andy! : )
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Old 07-16-2010, 02:30 PM   #4
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You're welcome. Enjoy this site.
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Old 07-31-2010, 05:48 PM   #5
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According to the knorr box I have here, it is 1:2, 1 cube to 2 cups of water...
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Old 07-31-2010, 07:31 PM   #6
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Yue,
thank you so much for welcoming me to this community.
When you use any type of prepared chicken stock be aware of the high sodium contents. I recommend you taste the final mix before using it in your recipe.
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Old 08-02-2010, 05:51 AM   #7
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i am into seasoning foods as i cook them. then if the food is under/over-seasoned , you've got the room to adjust that.
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Old 08-02-2010, 06:27 AM   #8
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Whenever I substitute chicken cubes in a recipe calling for chicken stock I don't use salt (because the cubes are already salty) and then I add more cubes per water than the directions on the package calls for because it adds extra flavor.....sometimes almost twice as many cubes than the amount of water called for when using the Wyler's brand. Knorr cubes are bigger though so maybe more but not quite double.

I hope that wasn't a confusing explanation.

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Old 08-02-2010, 09:42 AM   #9
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If it's available in your area, you might also try broth from a carton. Chicken broth is the only version I'd recommend (beef and other broths from a can/carton taste like crud to me). After purchasing more than a dozen cartons/cans and blind testing against my homemade broth, Swanson seemed like an acceptable substitute in dishes where it wasn't the primary ingredient.

You should give homemade stock a shot too! Even if you're limited with your freezer space, you can reduce the homemade stock to a syrup/glace consistency and freeze in ice-trays (then transfer to a ziplock bag). Try it on a day that you know you'll be home. Makes the house smell great, and blows any cube/carton/can out of the water. I make a ton of it twice a year, and then reduce/cube as above.

I recommend two big pots and a $5 fat separator.

Here is my recipe which is very simple. Scale as needed...

8-lb Chicken wings, backs, and necks (use almost anything but the liver).
1 Gallon of filtered water (tap is okay if your town makes good water).
1-t Kosher Salt

No need for vegetables or herbs. Keeping it simple allows you to make multi-cultural dishes instead of just western foods. For example, I don't like my Sichuan dishes to taste like bay, thyme, and celery.

Put it all in a big stock pot over high heat and bring to a simmer. Skim off any foam from the surface of the water as it develops (caused by blood and free proteins). Turn back the heat to maintain the simmer and replenish water as needed to cover the chicken. After eight hours of simmering, strain the pot contents into another bowl/pot. Use the separator to remove the fat (save it for roasting potatoes or sauteed chicken breasts!). Then either pour the stock into ziplock containers (cool for an hour) and freeze, or put it back in a a pot and reduce to a syrup/glace. Then handle as above.
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Old 08-02-2010, 11:30 AM   #10
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Ditto the Swanson recommendation - and get the low sodium carton.
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