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Old 08-03-2005, 11:07 AM   #11
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As far as bones goes, if you want to make even more gelatinous, use chicken feet. The bones from legs anf neck are really good, but otherwise any bones will do.
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Old 08-03-2005, 10:13 PM   #12
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If you were to be industrious, only buy whole chickens and butcher them yourself into boneless breasts, tenders, thighs and drumsticks, saving the bones and scraps for stock. Your local butcher will do the work for you as well.

Also, every time you cook bone-in chicken, save the bones for stock.

And consider buying a bigger pot.
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Old 08-03-2005, 11:26 PM   #13
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If you can't use up all the stock you made, try freezing it in 1 or 2 cup containers. That way you can just grab it out of the freezer when you need it in the future. I even freeze stock in ice cube trays for those times when I need just a little bit. After they are frozen solid; I pop them out and store in zip top freezer bags.
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Old 08-04-2005, 01:11 AM   #14
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Hey, Shunka! I do that ice-cube tray trick too! It sure saves time and gets great results!
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Old 08-04-2005, 01:28 AM   #15
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Hi all,

G4user - hi there I'm in Ireland too, although I'm origionally from Canada Welcome to the site, I love it here, it's like getting together with a big group of your favourite friends!

I always try to freeze my chicken carcases if I'm not going to be using them for stock right away. But in a carcass needing pinch I have often been able to score some for free or next to nothing from butchers - both independent and grocery store types.

In days gone by the gelatinous part of the stock was not only prized it was revered as a sign of a great stock maker!
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Old 08-04-2005, 08:04 AM   #16
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In the orient, when they make stocks, they use the bones so as to extract the collagen (a cousing to portien and very nutritious). If slightly acidic veggies are added to the cooking stock, it helps extract the collagen (the stuff that makes it gell) from the bones. These stocks are known in the orient as soups of longevity.

When you make your stock, especially when you are using poultry, it's best to crack the bones before adding to the liquid. The joints of the bones are reich in collagen as well.

Collagen does not have any flavor. But when you have cooked the bones long enough to extract the collagen, and the stock gells wehn cooled, then you have also extracted as much flavor as possible from the ingredients. I also add the poultry skins to my stock as it's cooking, for that extra flavor. I refridgerate it overnight. The fat floats on top and hardens, much like parafin. I then lift it off the gelled stock and have a fat-free stock with tons of flavor. I don't season it while making the initial stock as I can then divide it into meal-sized portions, and season it for whatever meal I'm preparing.

So, as the others have stated, yes, your stock is indeed better when gelled, and more nutritious to boot.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 08-04-2005, 08:11 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
And consider buying a bigger pot.
Amen, I never have a big enough pot at home to satisfy me, although at work the tilt skillet is great
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Old 08-05-2005, 09:21 AM   #18
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I don't even know how to cook in a small pot. My pots are 5, 8, 10, 12 and 16 quarts. Whenever I try to cook in a small pot I end up moving stuff latter into a biger one.
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Old 08-05-2005, 11:13 AM   #19
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I hear that CharlieD!!!! It is terrible that I don't have as many to cook for as I used to have.
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Old 08-05-2005, 12:04 PM   #20
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Shunka, just cook your "regular giant meal" and then freeze the unused part for a lazy day! Or, ship it to us (hee hee)
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