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Old 11-28-2014, 08:03 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Jamie212 View Post
Try sesame oil dribbled at the end of your dish. Or, in some cases, try using oyster sauce.
I read somewhere (Zaar?) that shaking a tiny bit of sugar (I keep an old spice jar filled with some) into the dish as you finish it will also help, along with the sesame oil. I always save empty spice jars if they have shaker tops in case I buy something without one. Indian food stores sell lots of varieties of curry in boxes for example (although I suspect they all have more or less the same ingredients in different amounts).
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Old 04-21-2015, 12:45 AM   #32
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The one thing which is important for effective stir-frying is to use a wok stove with high output. Below is the excerpt from an article I wrote for beef stir-fry:

The Correct Way to Stir-fry- Step by Step

1. Heat up the oil on low heat. Flavor the oil with your choice of aromatic ingredients, such as ginger and spring onion.
2. Push the ginger and spring onion to the edge of the wok and set the heat to the hottest grade.
3. Once the oil is piping hot, add the meat, quickly stir and toss.
4. Use the wok shovel to arrange the beef in a single layer and let it sears for a while.
5. Turn the heat up, add the stir fry sauce and vegetables such as spring onion and ginger. Quickly stir-fry for twenty seconds.
6. Adjust the flame to medium heat. Add the cornstarch slurry to the food and stir-fry until the cornstarch is cooked and has thickened.

Cast iron wok is effective to generate wok-hei, the breath of wok which is the signature aroma in the kitchen of a Chinese restaurant. Begin with low heat and culminate with high heat at the end of the stir-frying process will give you the flavor you look for.

Hope this helps :)
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Old 04-21-2015, 10:52 AM   #33
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After having an experience watching Chinese chefs doing their thing up close and personal, one thing is that they use a lot more oil than you'd be led to believe. Lots more.

Horrible as it may sound to some, if you are tolerant of MSG (and you probably are if you feel fine after a restaurant meal), I agree it is one of the answers. I buy Maggi seasononing (yes, a form of MSG) when I'm going to stir fry beef or pork, and sprinkle it liberally with the seasoning after cutting, and let it sit in the fridge for an hour or so. Then I put in a little cornstarch, toss, heat the oil, and go to town. I only stir-fry for the two of us, and neither have reactions to MSG (and it isn't like we eat it every day).

The biggest trick to stir frying is, to me, mis en place. Make sure all of your ingredients are cut, soaked (dried Asian mushrooms) and ready to go before you turn on a burner.

I agree, the main factor for me is prep, prep, prep. Oh, and prep. Everything needs to be prepped and ready to go when you start cooking.

I only use carbon steel woks.

I also use MSG, but you only need very small amounts, quarter of a teaspoon usually.

I never try and emulate restaurants, most Chinese cooking in the Western world is actually altered for western palates.
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Old 04-22-2015, 02:59 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Wyshiepoo View Post
I agree, the main factor for me is prep, prep, prep. Oh, and prep. Everything needs to be prepped and ready to go when you start cooking.

I only use carbon steel woks.

I also use MSG, but you only need very small amounts, quarter of a teaspoon usually.

I never try and emulate restaurants, most Chinese cooking in the Western world is actually altered for western palates.
It always makes me smile sardonically when I read a cookery article that airily states that a stir fry is a quick meal for 6 only taking 10 minutes. to cook. Probably but that's not counting the three and a half hours spent cutting and choppingprecisely. OK so 3 1/2 hours is an exaggeration but you get know what I mean.

Further to your last sentence. I don't know whether they still do but the Yang Sing in Manchester (very up-market restaurant in its day) used to have a menu of Chinese food for European customers and a menu of Chinese food for Chinese customers and those in the know would ask for the latter.
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Old 04-22-2015, 03:03 PM   #35
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I grew up eating Chinese food in the U.S. I decided I liked it and learned to cook it. If I then went to eat from a different menu, I could well be disappointed in the result. Some of what I cook may not be recognizable on the Chinese mainland, but we like it.
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Old 04-22-2015, 03:28 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by kwankapang View Post
The one thing which is important for effective stir-frying is to use a wok stove with high output. Below is the excerpt from an article I wrote for beef stir-fry:

The Correct Way to Stir-fry- Step by Step

1. Heat up the oil on low heat. Flavor the oil with your choice of aromatic ingredients, such as ginger and spring onion.
2. Push the ginger and spring onion to the edge of the wok and set the heat to the hottest grade.
3. Once the oil is piping hot, add the meat, quickly stir and toss.
4. Use the wok shovel to arrange the beef in a single layer and let it sears for a while.
5. Turn the heat up, But its's already as hot as it will get! add the stir fry sauce and vegetables such as spring onion and ginger. Quickly stir-fry for twenty seconds.
6. Adjust the flame to medium heat. Add the cornstarch slurry to the food and stir-fry until the cornstarch is cooked and has thickened.

Cast iron wok is effective to generate wok-hei, the breath of wok which is the signature aroma in the kitchen of a Chinese restaurant. Begin with low heat and culminate with high heat at the end of the stir-frying process will give you the flavor you look for.

Hope this helps :)


Otherwise very good advice
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Old 04-22-2015, 08:50 PM   #37
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The Correct Way to Stir-fry- Step by Step

Thank you Jennyema for your review of my stir-fry step.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:09 PM   #38
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Welcome to DC Kwankapang. So much fun here.
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