"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-31-2011, 04:52 AM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 6
Unhappy Chinese cooking

My wife and I love stirfrys and also fried rice and use a cast iron wok over gas flame .the wok is 15 years old and well seasoned,yet we cannot get the taste
to match Chinese restaurant food.we get very close but there seem to be a flavor missing.We buy our ingredients from a Chinese grocer yet feel that something is missing We would appreciate any assistance and advice that any one can offer.

__________________

__________________
Dallis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 05:10 AM   #2
Cook
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 61
Check this out:

Umami - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But remember that msg may cause certain bad health effects.
__________________

__________________
tropical cooker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 07:14 AM   #3
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Austin, TX.
Posts: 569
Sesame oil to finish the sauce?

Eric, Austin Tx.
__________________
giggler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 07:37 AM   #4
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Canberra, Australia
Posts: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by tropical cooker
Check this out:

Umami - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

But remember that msg may cause certain bad health effects.
I agree with tropicalcooker....the only thing you're missing is MSG. In some people it causes allergic reactions, so that's why its not used do much in Western culture.
__________________
www.eatlovemove.blogspot.com
EatLoveMove is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 09:14 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallis View Post
My wife and I love stirfrys and also fried rice and use a cast iron wok over gas flame .the wok is 15 years old and well seasoned,yet we cannot get the taste
to match Chinese restaurant food.we get very close but there seem to be a flavor missing.We buy our ingredients from a Chinese grocer yet feel that something is missing We would appreciate any assistance and advice that any one can offer.
Much Chinese - American cooking is done in carbon steel woks over high btu output gas rings which often have a foot operated flame control valve. The flame from such gas rings may achieve a maximum height of some 12".
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 09:47 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Bolas De Fraile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,193
MSG ?
__________________
I was married by a judge, I should have asked for a jury.
Bolas De Fraile is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 10:51 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
Cilantro?
__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 10:51 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
powerplantop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 2,155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallis View Post
My wife and I love stirfrys and also fried rice and use a cast iron wok over gas flame .the wok is 15 years old and well seasoned,yet we cannot get the taste
to match Chinese restaurant food.we get very close but there seem to be a flavor missing.We buy our ingredients from a Chinese grocer yet feel that something is missing We would appreciate any assistance and advice that any one can offer.
My wok collection includes nonstick, stainless steel, carbon steel and a cast iron wok. Now I mostly use the carbon steel and a cast iron woks. The carbon steel one I use the most is flatter is from South America and is called a disco. The cast iron woks are cantonese.

My nonstick and stainless one catch dust now.

The book that helped me the most is stir fry to the sky's edge. After reading this book my wok cooking greatly improved. I have others that I use but this is the one that got me over the hump.

I never use MSG.

I make my own Asian chicken stock and I think that this helps a lot.

Heat: Depending upon the dish high heat may be required. But not all dishes need extreme heat. I have an outdoor burner that gives a lot of heat. Your wok should be just starting to smoke before you add anything. Then you will need enough heat to bring it back to temp quickly. Then you will get a good sear and not boil your meat.

Use fresh garlic and ginger. The pre chopped or paste are not the same.

Here is an easy one you can try.
__________________
My YouTube cooking channel
powerplantop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 04:40 PM   #9
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by justplainbill View Post
Much Chinese - American cooking is done in carbon steel woks over high btu output gas rings which often have a foot operated flame control valve. The flame from such gas rings may achieve a maximum height of some 12".
this.

I grew up in China and the only wok we use in my family is carbon steel wok. It doesn't hold heat, and gets hot/cools down fairly quickly, which is important in chinese cooking because you'll have to rapidly adjust your heat during cooking, and if it takes too long the food will be overcooked.

However, to get authentic chinese stirfry taste, you'll need a big ass gas burner. Not the one in your kitchen but the outdoor one. Alton Brown explained this in one of his episode, I think it's one of the squid episodes.
__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-31-2011, 05:33 PM   #10
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
After having an experience watching Chinese chefs doing their thing up close and personal, one thing is that they use a lot more oil than you'd be led to believe. Lots more.

Horrible as it may sound to some, if you are tolerant of MSG (and you probably are if you feel fine after a restaurant meal), I agree it is one of the answers. I buy Maggi seasononing (yes, a form of MSG) when I'm going to stir fry beef or pork, and sprinkle it liberally with the seasoning after cutting, and let it sit in the fridge for an hour or so. Then I put in a little cornstarch, toss, heat the oil, and go to town. I only stir-fry for the two of us, and neither have reactions to MSG (and it isn't like we eat it every day).

The biggest trick to stir frying is, to me, mis en place. Make sure all of your ingredients are cut, soaked (dried Asian mushrooms) and ready to go before you turn on a burner.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
chinese, cooking

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.