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Old 02-26-2011, 06:37 PM   #1
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Clarifying Butter

Would someone please tell me how to clarify butter and what is the advantage of doing it? Thank you. Betsy.

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Old 02-26-2011, 06:44 PM   #2
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When you clarify butter the milk solids are removed so it tends not to burn as easily.
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Old 02-26-2011, 08:25 PM   #3
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To clarify butter, you heat it gently until the solids separate. It's fairly easy in the microwave. You can do it on the stove top, but you have to keep an eye on it so it doesn't burn.

Clarified butter has a higher smoke point than butter, it stays fresh longer, and is often digestible by people who are lactose intolerant.

I have read that people use the solids as a spread on toast.
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Old 02-26-2011, 10:15 PM   #4
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Butter contains fat, milk solids and water. The point of clarifying is to remove the water and milk solids so all you have left is the fat.

Melt butter on the stove. The milk solids will settle to the bottom and a foam will form on the top. Skim off the foam and let the butter cook for several minutes to boil off the water (about 20% of butter is water in the US). Watch the pot so the butter does not brown. When the water is gone, let the fat cool slightly then carefully pour off the bright yellow fat, leaving the milk solids in the pan.
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Old 02-26-2011, 10:20 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Butter contains fat, milk solids and water. The point of clarifying is to remove the water and milk solids so all you have left is the fat.

Melt butter on the stove. The milk solids will settle to the bottom and a foam will form on the top. Skim off the foam and let the butter cook for several minutes to boil off the water (about 20% of butter is water in the US). Watch the pot so the butter does not brown. When the water is gone, let the fat cool slightly then carefully pour off the bright yellow fat, leaving the milk solids in the pan.
Andy, that's a much better explanation than mine. Thank you.
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Old 02-26-2011, 11:57 PM   #6
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A neat thing that I noticed when I first began to clarify butter was - as the 2 parts begin to seperate, the top, foamy-half, consisted of like, 95% SALT! I don't suppose that I have ever tried to clarify a salt-free version of butter before, but, if you have a regular 'ole stick of the stuff, &, for whatever reason you need to monitor sodium levels, well, dang it - just clarify it. Works like a charm!
Just though, in MY particular cases, I have found the top, foamy half to be pretty much garbage afterwards. It's just far TOO salty. &, ...I LIKE salt myself, but...to me - wow! It can be pretty "potent stuff"!
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Old 02-27-2011, 12:46 AM   #7
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Over here you can tell the summer butter from the winter butter, the summer butter is a deeper yellow is that the same in the US?
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Old 02-27-2011, 02:20 AM   #8
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Over here you can tell the summer butter from the winter butter, the summer butter is a deeper yellow is that the same in the US?
Bolas...to MY knowledge,...no - in our markets, there is absolutely NO discticton between "new" vs. "old" other than having to display a date of expiration that the US mandates on their food sales.
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Old 02-27-2011, 10:03 AM   #9
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In the US, daisy cows are fed a uniform diet all year long so their milk and butter fat are a uniform color. Winter and summer butter does not mean new and old butter. Dairy cows give milk and factories make butter all year long.
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Old 02-27-2011, 10:51 AM   #10
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In the US, daisy cows are fed a uniform diet all year long so their milk and butter fat are a uniform color. Winter and summer butter does not mean new and old butter. Dairy cows give milk and factories make butter all year long.
I feed my chickens the same feed year round, but their yolks turn a deeper orange when grass and clover becomes a part of their diet again. Around here I see Holsteins turned out to pasture. It would stand to reason their milk would have to change from the added greens in their diet, but yet I never notice a change in the butter's color. And certainly not the milk's.
I wonder if we don't do something here in the US to keep the color the same, whereas in the UK they do things more naturally.
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