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Old 08-02-2014, 10:22 PM   #11
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From http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German

" "Low" refers to the flat plains and coastal area of the northern European lowlands, contrasted with the mountainous areas of central and southern Germany, Switzerland, and Austria, where High German is spoken."

Looks like you're right, Kathleen.

Two of our German exchange students gave me cookbooks in English by Dr. Oetker, who is apparently well-known there. I can paraphrase the recipe if anyone is interested.
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Old 08-02-2014, 11:01 PM   #12
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My grandmother made it clear that she spoke the "high German" and the neighbors spoke the "low German" but I can't remember her ever making a comment about high or low German potato salad. There are 100s, if not 1000s of recipes for potato salad not all of them German, high or low. I've made potato salad with bacon, but never included extra bacon grease or sugar but sometimes include sour cream in the dressing. Never gave it a thought to it being high or low German. Like Kayelle, I can't find a question to answer so have included my comments as part of the conversation.
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Old 08-03-2014, 12:32 AM   #13
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I don't mean to sound "testy", but it's dang frustrating when an OP just hits and runs..What's up with that? Nice people deserve better. Sigh. Done here.
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Old 08-03-2014, 08:23 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldvine View Post
My grandmother made it clear that she spoke the "high German" and the neighbors spoke the "low German" but I can't remember her ever making a comment about high or low German potato salad. There are 100s, if not 1000s of recipes for potato salad not all of them German, high or low. I've made potato salad with bacon, but never included extra bacon grease or sugar but sometimes include sour cream in the dressing. Never gave it a thought to it being high or low German. Like Kayelle, I can't find a question to answer so have included my comments as part of the conversation.
This isn't about potato salad per se. The OP talked about high vs low German cooking and I used that as an example.
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Old 08-03-2014, 08:43 AM   #15
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I can only think of formal German vs informal. Sorta like:

Was machst du heute? (informal)

Was machen Sie heute? (formal)

What are you doing/making today?
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Old 08-03-2014, 09:01 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I can only think of formal German vs informal. Sorta like:

Was machst du heute? (informal)

Was machen Sie heute? (formal)

What are you doing/making today?
I think that's something else. Everything I have read about high and low German talks about geographical differences.
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Old 08-03-2014, 10:07 AM   #17
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I could give you a run for your money comparing high German and low German dialects as a linguist, spent 4 years during undergraduate studies comparing German dialects and 2 more years playing with the same to earn my M.A. in linguistics (German and French). I also lived in northern Germany (Oldenburg) where there were a lot of people who spoke plattdeutsch--and there was a weekly newspaper written in pd.

From a cook's perspective, the difference would be regional cooking and not based on whether one spoke high German or a dialect. I'm suggesting the appropriate subject title for this thread would be regional German cooking--and this would include Swiss and Austrian dishes as well. Just sayin'.
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Old 08-03-2014, 03:23 PM   #18
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I completely understood that it was not simply about potato salad but continued using the "potato salad" example in my comments. I could have switched and used rye bread for my example adding that my grandma, that spoke high German, baked rye bread that tasted exactly as yummy as the neighbor lady's, that spoke low German. My point was that I've never heard of a difference of high or low in German cooking. Maybe family style as compared to nobility. But even nobility had family style meals now and then. Different regions in different countries have different versions of recipes. My grandfather fled Germany leaving family members in the "nobility". They eventually lost that status but still they spoke high German but, apparently without knowing it, were eating low German meals. I don't feel that adding information or not understanding something is being testy. It should be thought of as discussion.
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Old 08-03-2014, 03:53 PM   #19
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I'm sorry, Oldvine. I didn't get that from your previous post, I think since you mentioned that there are potato salad recipes that aren't German.

CWS, I think you're right about regional differences regarding cooking rather than the German dialect one speaks.
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Old 08-03-2014, 04:50 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathleen View Post
A long time ago, in German class with Herr McGlothlin, we were taught that high-German meant it came from the highlands and low-German was the low lands. Typically, we were told that low lands have a lot of farms.

Mind you, I'm quoting Herr McGlothlin who married Helga who made the BEST German potato salad bar none. By the time I got to German IV, I'd forgotten to ask for the recipe. :)
Herr McGlothlin, now there's a good old German name he probably meant in this sense Hochdeutsch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

However, he could have been fudging the "class" question. According to my Scots friend, Rhona, who has lived in Regensburg for half a lifetime and my Viennese friend, Barbara, the High and Low thing is also a class/snobbery thing ie the aristocracy v the peasants.

Who knows what it means in the culinary usage.
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