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Old 08-03-2014, 05:09 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Herr McGlothlin, now there's a good old German name he probably meant in this sense Hochdeutsch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

However, he could have been fudging the "class" question. According to my Scots friend, Rhona, who has lived in Regensburg for half a lifetime and my Viennese friend, Barbara, the High and Low thing is also a class/snobbery thing ie the aristocracy v the peasants.

Who knows what it means in the culinary usage.
The OP also wrote the title as, "Comparing high German vs. low German cooking". Later, the OP wrote "platt deuch". Platt doesn't mean low. It means dialect. So, I think it's about the cooking of those who speak that dialect, but until the OP chimes in, we won't know for sure.
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Old 08-03-2014, 10:54 PM   #22
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I took German for 8 years in school and was fluent till I went off to college .... I thought low and high was a regional thing, too.

But my father was shipped off to Germany during the Korean War (lucky!) and my mother took a Euopean vacation which included a visit with her GI boyfriend and then married him and lived for 6 years in Bavaria.

My mother is an excellent cook and brought back many recipes, includind kartoffle salat (spelling) which was served warm from the bacon grease and always had vinegar and a bit of sugar. No pickles. But she also omitted pickles from her rouladen too. I guess she just didn't like them.
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Old 08-03-2014, 11:54 PM   #23
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I was pretty fluent in German too. I had to be. Grandma could not see that well so I read to her. It's a fond memory. Some times while I read, she baked or cooked from memory. But after she died, no one wanted to speak German including the cousins that spoke only German in their homes.
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Old 08-05-2014, 05:26 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
Herr McGlothlin, now there's a good old German name he probably meant in this sense Hochdeutsch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

However, he could have been fudging the "class" question. According to my Scots friend, Rhona, who has lived in Regensburg for half a lifetime and my Viennese friend, Barbara, the High and Low thing is also a class/snobbery thing ie the aristocracy v the peasants.

Who knows what it means in the culinary usage.
Yep, I'm sure that is exactly what he meant. He would tell us that we were learning high German and may have trouble understanding someone from the low lands as they spoke "low German." I didn't get the idea that it was about class or formality at all. He would compare it to someone who learned English in the UK speaking to someone who was born and raised in deep in the southern country of the States. Native English speakers would navigate it, but a new learner to English would struggle in that situation. It made sense to us.

It also makes sense that regional cooking may differ too. He told us that Beer and Brats were more Bavarian and most of us would think of Bavarian kind of food as "German." Oh, and top it off with Black Forest Cherry Cake from the Black Forest (of course.) We went to a restaurant while visiting Milwaukee that was known for its southern German food, which served what we would think of as "German" except they would not give us Bier.

Rhineland, he told us, was good for food like sauerbrauten, sauces and stollen.

We were told to "go north" for fish.

I'm sure there is a lot of mingling of regional foods now. I was in Berlin two years ago, and could find most anything.

It was high school and our German exchange student taught us a wonderful and highly inappropriate song that helped us remember the "three regions" of Deutschland. The refrain translated to, "There's the highland Deutsch and the lowland Deutsch, the Rhineland Deutsch and the other [censored] [censored] (which referred to those who claimed to be German but really were a gazillion other nationalities.) Other smaller areas in the country all seem to fall in to one of the three large regions: Northern, Southern, and Rhineland.

Wow...and I thought I remembered precious little from high school. It must have been the graffiti wall in the back of the room. All in German, of course. First thing written on it: "Wo ist Pieter? Im Boat mit Helga." For the record, we had many things written about Pieter und Helga.
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Old 08-05-2014, 09:43 AM   #25
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Kathleen, that matches what I learned from our exchange students.

One additional thing: German chocolate cake isn't German at all! It was named for a man named German who developed the chocolate bar in the 1880s used in the cake recipe.
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Old 08-05-2014, 10:44 AM   #26
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Kathleen, that matches what I learned from our exchange students.

One additional thing: German chocolate cake isn't German at all! It was named for a man named German who developed the chocolate bar in the 1880s used in the cake recipe.
Was he hispanic/latino where G and J are pronounced like an H?

What about Black Forest Cake?
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Old 08-05-2014, 11:24 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Was he hispanic/latino where G and J are pronounced like an H?

What about Black Forest Cake?
Oh yeah, the Black Forest Cake is German. Black Forest cake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Interestingly, the name "Black Forest cake" is sort of misleading too. "The cake is named not directly after the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) mountain range in southwestern Germany but rather from the specialty liquor of that region, known as Schwarzwälder Kirsch(wasser) and distilled from tart cherries."

The German chocolate cake was originally called "German's chocolate cake".

"It owes its name to an American chocolate maker named Sam German, who developed a formulation of dark baking chocolate that came to be used in the cake recipe." from German chocolate cake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 08-05-2014, 11:28 AM   #28
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Was he hispanic/latino where G and J are pronounced like an H?

What about Black Forest Cake?
I don't think so. His first name was Sam - http://whatscookingamerica.net/Histo...colateCake.htm

Black Forest cake is named for the Black Forest in Germany.
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Old 08-05-2014, 12:04 PM   #29
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The original name of the chocolate in "German's chocolate cake" was "Baker's German's Sweet Chocolate". Which is kind of funny, because "Baker's Chocolate" is another one of those names that is slightly misleading. It takes its name from one of the original partners, "Dr. Walter Baker".

GG, I think you were posting at the same time as me.
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Old 08-05-2014, 12:30 PM   #30
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The original name of the chocolate in "German's chocolate cake" was "Baker's German's Sweet Chocolate". Which is kind of funny, because "Baker's Chocolate" is another one of those names that is slightly misleading. It takes its name from one of the original partners, "Dr. Walter Baker".

GG, I think you were posting at the same time as me.
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