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Old 01-31-2013, 05:57 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I hesitate to jump into the fray here but here's an observation on my part.

The new poster came here looking for help making roux, and got some sound advice. I'm sure he/she has run for the hills by now. The last two pages have turned into a cat fight.
Holy SPAMoli!
I'd have to agree.
Didn't someone mention not too long ago about ten posts off topic was too much and would be split?
I was wondering how much could be said about a roux when this post was started a while ago.

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Old 01-31-2013, 07:01 PM   #22
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You are so right, this has gone way off topic and as such I have split it off.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:41 PM   #23
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i find myself agreeing with some parts of what everyone has had to say in this thread. well, almost anyway. for me personally, that is something that just doesn't occur very often. i welcome and appreciate this sort of straightforward exchange of ideas, and would like nothing better than to see more of it.
this debate developed into something with some real meat to it, even if, or maybe because of, the fact that it went off-topic--which was, what again?

because the subject was allowed to develop beyond the concrete pros and cons of addie and puffin's initial positions, i think we were able to appreciate that each had some distinctly valid views to offer. not only that, but more people felt inclined to join in, further broadening the field of inquiry with contributions of their own.

let's have more lively conversations such as this thread encouraged....:)
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:48 PM   #24
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It wouldn't be so bad if all you brought home in that convenience bag or box was food. Instead they're full of non-food stuff and chemicals that don't belong in our bodies.

Spending $50 on crap in the grocery store is amazingly easy. Or one can spend $50 on produce, a couple hunks of meat, some cheese and rice / beans / polenta and make several delicious dinners (with the added bonus of great left-overs for lunch!)

I would get flustered if I had to rush in the door every night and start from zero to get dinner on the table. So I've learned over time that I don't have to cook everything at once. I pretty much cook a day or two ahead as much as possible and do sides & salads the night of. I spend a couple hours a couple times a week seriously cooking it up and the rest of the time it's just a matter of pulling things together or finishing them up.
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Old 01-31-2013, 08:59 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zereh View Post
It wouldn't be so bad if all you brought home in that convenience bag or box was food. Instead they're full of non-food stuff and chemicals that don't belong in our bodies.

Spending $50 on crap in the grocery store is amazingly easy. Or one can spend $50 on produce, a couple hunks of meat, some cheese and rice / beans / polenta and make several delicious dinners (with the added bonus of great left-overs for lunch!)

I would get flustered if I had to rush in the door every night and start from zero to get dinner on the table. So I've learned over time that I don't have to cook everything at once. I pretty much cook a day or two ahead as much as possible and do sides & salads the night of. I spend a couple hours a couple times a week seriously cooking it up and the rest of the time it's just a matter of pulling things together or finishing them up.
How long did it take you to develop this habit? Back when I started out, I ran my rear off at work and ran home to run around trying to get dinner ready. Now I know about cooking ahead and have the leisure time and money to cook good food.

I know I am not the only person who had a choice between eating and paying rent at times.
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Old 01-31-2013, 09:11 PM   #26
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Since I only work part time, I often have the time to cook "from scratch" and have given up a lot of convenience foods for the most part. However, I HATE dicing veggies so those ones already chopped get bought on occasion. I kill plants on a regular basis so please don't ask me to grow my own herbs. I'll buy mine chopped, powdered, grated whatever, from the store. I have a large freezer so I do a lot of frozen veggies and meats. I don't know that I would buy premade roux since I don't find it all that difficult to make and when I want something that requires a roux, I plan to have the time to make it.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:52 PM   #27
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There is a woman in N.O. who had a bright idea. It takes a looong time to make a proper roux. And a lot of stirring. So she decided to make some, place it in jars and sell it. She now makes it in her large factory kitchen in different shades of doneness and it has become a big hit. Good luck to her and her inventivness. Another success story.
It is true that some people don't have the time, or won't make the time, these days to do what seems simple and normal to other of us.

We have become a world of convenience.

Those who choose to indulge in that convenience have made the choice to go that route.

It's not the route everyone chooses but that does not make it wrong.

Regardless of what people think, I applaud this lady for going for it and taking her shot at the American Dream .. good luck to her !!
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Old 01-31-2013, 11:04 PM   #28
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I will be looking for the bottled roux, simply because I cannot stand at the stove for the time required to make it myself, without causing back and leg pains that will last for days.

I've been wanting to make gumbo again for some time now, but it makes my back hurt just thinking about having to stand there long enough to make the proper roux.
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Old 01-31-2013, 11:22 PM   #29
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I can see the point of convenience foods, and I don't have a problem with people who use them. However, I enjoy cooking from scratch. I also enjoy the challenge of making great food on a budget. If you look at French cuisine, one thing that stands out is that it evolved from peasant food. People took what little scraps they had and turned it into haute cuisine.

I'll give you one example, just because it's fresh in my memory from this week. We had French onion soup a couple of nights ago. I made the beef stock myself with a leftover bone given to me by my MIL. Add water, carrot, an onion, and a few herbs from the deck, and put it in the oven for 6 hours. I could've even made it in the crockpot while at work. Cost for ingredients: less than $1. My time: about 10 minutes (I don't count the time it was in the oven because I didn't have to do anything). Tuesday I bought a bag of onions, sliced them in the food processor and cooked them for 30 minutes on the stove top until they were caramelized. Mix it with the stock and you have soup. Delicious soup, too. The total cost to make 2 quarts of soup was somewhere around $3. And I froze half of it. So there's two meals without much time or money involved.

If I had bought the same amount of soup at the store, it would've probably cost closer to $15. In a restaurant, I've seen it selling for $8 a bowl.
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Old 02-01-2013, 01:16 AM   #30
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We are all foodies, cooks, chefs and generally people who love to cook here.
There are a LOT of people out there who don't share our love of cooking;
they think chopping onions, peppers and celery is a chore, not a joy.
They have no interest, and take no pleasure in the long process of making
a nice roux....
But for those of them who want to cook, things like pre-chopped veggies,
roux in a jar, Kraft breadings and cheese, pizza crust in a tube are HEAVEN-SENT!
With these convenience products, they can quickly and fairly easily create real
meals that don't come from a box, are more healthy and taste better!
And for those who have busy lives, it can give them time to make a meal
for their family, instead of living on take-out and frozen meals.
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