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Old 01-30-2013, 03:08 PM   #1
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Convenience Foods

There is a woman in N.O. who had a bright idea. It takes a looong time to make a proper roux. And a lot of stirring. So she decided to make some, place it in jars and sell it. She now makes it in her large factory kitchen in different shades of doneness and it has become a big hit. Good luck to her and her inventivness. Another success story.
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:19 PM   #2
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There is a woman in N.O. who had a bright idea. It takes a looong time to make a proper roux. And a lot of stirring. So she decided to make some, place it in jars and sell it. She now makes it in her large factory kitchen in different shades of doneness and it has become a big hit. Good luck to her and her inventivness. Another success story.
So if I understand, this woman is selling a roux to people who can't be bothered making "a proper roux" because "it takes a looong time". OKYDOKY.
This my friends is the definition of the classic phrase: "the dumbing down of America". "Who needs to learn how to do anything properly anymore? I can buy something in a jar instead". Sigh.
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:28 PM   #3
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So if I understand, this woman is selling a roux to people who can't be bothered making "a proper roux" because "it takes a looong time". OKYDOKY.
This my friends is the definition of the classic phrase: "the dumbing down of America". "Who needs to learn how to do anything properly anymore? I can buy something in a jar instead". Sigh.
You sound so angry. Have we done something that really displeases you? This is not the first post you have made with this attitude. We try to be friends to everyone and realize that there is more than one way to do something.

Sometimes busy working mothers simply do not have the time to spend hours in the kitchen like their grandmothers did.
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:34 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
So if I understand, this woman is selling a roux to people who can't be bothered making "a proper roux" because "it takes a looong time". OKYDOKY.
This my friends is the definition of the classic phrase: "the dumbing down of America". "Who needs to learn how to do anything properly anymore? I can buy something in a jar instead". Sigh.
I think your idea of a proper roux and a Cajun roux are different products
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Old 01-30-2013, 04:20 PM   #5
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You sound so angry. Have we done something that really displeases you? This is not the first post you have made with this attitude. We try to be friends to everyone and realize that there is more than one way to do something.

Sometimes busy working mothers simply do not have the time to spend hours in the kitchen like their grandmothers did.
No I am not "angry". I assumed that people who come to this forum do so to actually learn something....not to be 'enabled'.
I was raised in a very loving but very strict Mennonite family. As a 14 year old boy I and a few cousins my age prepared a full meal for thirty family members just to show we could.
I have offered my opinions here based on over sixty years as a professional cook, a former restaurant owner and home cook and someone who cooked three meals a day for my crew on my commercial fishing boat for twenty years and as a tug boat captain. Frankly there isn't much I don't know about the basics of cooking. In the last few years, as a retirement hobby, I started to learn how to make classic french stocks and sauces. If I needed to I could get a job as a 'saucier' in any french restaurant in the country. I can make a 'Sauce Poivrade' in my sleep.
What drives me crazy is this attitude the 'Oh well, if you don't have time just buy a jar of something'. That's fine and I don't have any problem with that at all. But it's for culinary 'civilians'. They can get all the info they need from 'All-cooks' etc off the internet.
I want to exchange ideas with anyone who has a passion for food. That's what I thought this forum was about. I should have got the message when the first dozen posts I put up about 'low and slow' and 'SV' were responded to with "I'd be careful of undercooked food". etc etc.
I express my opinions in a no-nonsense way. Don't like it? ignore me. If you want straight talk based on decades of experience you'll always get it from me.
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Old 01-30-2013, 05:34 PM   #6
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Puffin, I think the thing is that you come across as saying your way is the only right way. While we appreciate the contributions of people with lots of experience, you're not just direct - you're insulting. That can be discouraging to new cooks. We try to be encouraging here. Most members of DC *are* "civilians" and not professional cooks.

And, American cooking has changed from the classical French cooking you seem to revere. You might want to broaden your horizons a bit
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Old 01-30-2013, 05:42 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
There is a woman in N.O. who had a bright idea. It takes a looong time to make a proper roux. And a lot of stirring. So she decided to make some, place it in jars and sell it. She now makes it in her large factory kitchen in different shades of doneness and it has become a big hit. Good luck to her and her inventivness. Another success story.
There are allready products out there for lazy cooks, here is one:
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Old 01-30-2013, 05:47 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
There is a woman in N.O. who had a bright idea. It takes a looong time to make a proper roux. And a lot of stirring. So she decided to make some, place it in jars and sell it. She now makes it in her large factory kitchen in different shades of doneness and it has become a big hit. Good luck to her and her inventivness. Another success story.

Have you seen Seasoned Butter, Olive Oil Sauté Starter

Pre-packages butter/OO with herbs. I wish I had thought of it. They are likely to make a fortune.
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Old 01-30-2013, 10:13 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
No I am not "angry". I assumed that people who come to this forum do so to actually learn something....not to be 'enabled'.
I was raised in a very loving but very strict Mennonite family. As a 14 year old boy I and a few cousins my age prepared a full meal for thirty family members just to show we could.
I have offered my opinions here based on over sixty years as a professional cook, a former restaurant owner and home cook and someone who cooked three meals a day for my crew on my commercial fishing boat for twenty years and as a tug boat captain. Frankly there isn't much I don't know about the basics of cooking. In the last few years, as a retirement hobby, I started to learn how to make classic french stocks and sauces. If I needed to I could get a job as a 'saucier' in any french restaurant in the country. I can make a 'Sauce Poivrade' in my sleep.
What drives me crazy is this attitude the 'Oh well, if you don't have time just buy a jar of something'. That's fine and I don't have any problem with that at all. But it's for culinary 'civilians'. They can get all the info they need from 'All-cooks' etc off the Internet.
I want to exchange ideas with anyone who has a passion for food. That's what I thought this forum was about. I should have got the message when the first dozen posts I put up about 'low and slow' and 'SV' were responded to with "I'd be careful of undercooked food". etc etc.
I express my opinions in a no-nonsense way. Don't like it? ignore me. If you want straight talk based on decades of experience you'll always get it from me.
Puffin I was married to a professional chef. He attended some of the finest culinary schools in Europe. He taught me my knife skills. What he didn't teach me was how to cook. He ate many a bride's meal. Unless I asked him for help, he ate what I made. On occasion he would go into the kitchen and make a meal with French sauces and other exotic foods. The kids loved it, I wasn't so fond. I like my New England dishes that I grew up with and my mother taught me. But he never got angry or upset because I wasn't so interested in what he could teach me if only I asked. He never criticized what I served. Nor did he offer suggestions unless I asked. He worked in some of the finest restaurants in Boston and New Hampshire. He too started out as a young boy as an apprentice to a Chef in France until he was old enough to attend culinary school. He was with that Chef for 2.5 years. He had years of experience yet he never criticized anyone's food. He had a pleasant attitude regarding his work. And for that, many folks, myself included, were very grateful to him. If asked about food, he would answer you and give you the benefit of his knowledge in a very pleasant manner. He didn't show off or try to inpress anyone. I still miss him and hope he is happy in heaven. I am sure he is cooking some heavenly food now.
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:03 AM   #10
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Although I have to agree with the comments made about the way Puffin presents his/her opinions, a good point is being made. America is being dumbed down and wallets emptied by all the conveniences.

Case in point, I noticed last week in our grocery flyer that Kraft has apparently come out with a new product, bread/panko crumbs, fresh cheese and spice mixtures. I just Googled it to make sure I had the brand right and they have quite a few mixtures out, ALL of which could be easily made at home in just a very few minutes and a heck of a lot cheaper than what they cost in the grocery. Even at BOGO prices last week I thought it was too expensive to buy, especially since the last time we tried something along similar lines we weren't happy with it at all.

Let's not even mention the tubs of chopped onions, peppers, etc. they have in the produce department. I mean really, how long does it take to chop up an onion? I'll admit I buy pre-peeled garlic cloves (whole cloves, not chopped, I want to see what I'm using) when I'm making up a batch of sausage or something else that requires huge quantities of garlic but chopped onions?

Karen
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