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Old 04-10-2015, 02:06 PM   #31
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Ah, Cheers chaps, am not familiar with that term . so you would use the fond to deglaze the pan ? I think we would just call it meat juices/crusty bits , which I would make gravy or sauce from .
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Old 04-10-2015, 02:14 PM   #32
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You got it. Though I do like the term "crusty bits".
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Old 04-10-2015, 02:19 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
Ah, Cheers chaps, am not familiar with that term . so you would use the fond to deglaze the pan ? I think we would just call it meat juices/crusty bits , which I would make gravy or sauce from .

The fond is stuck to the pan. You would use a liquid, wine, stock or water to deglaze the pan (dissolve the fond) (crusty bits).
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Old 04-10-2015, 02:27 PM   #34
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You got it. Though I do like the term "crusty bits".
It wouldn't be the first time we have borrowed a word or two from the Brits. Crusty bits from here on in. Having been married to a Brit, I learned what a nappy with my first born and continued to use it with all five kids. It was like learning a whole new language. I even know what a rubber is in Brit language.
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Old 04-10-2015, 03:29 PM   #35
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Ah yes we can have fun with learning different terms and phrases . I used to buy Martha's Living magazine from Costco and I discovered I had a breakfront . I polish it in between cleaning out my mud room with a handcrafted mop made from an aged oak tree I chopped down and homespun wool from my hand reared highland cattle .
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:48 PM   #36
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It wouldn't be the first time we have borrowed a word or two from the Brits. Crusty bits from here on in. Having been married to a Brit, I learned what a nappy with my first born and continued to use it with all five kids. *It was like learning a whole new language. I even know what a rubber is in Brit language*.
And a whole generation of American soldiers, passing through Britain 70-odd years ago, must have thoroughly confused staff in chemist's shops and in turn the GIs must have been confused when they were sent to the stationery shop!

(and if DC-ers don't understand the afore-going they are far to young for me to explain it to them .)
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:05 PM   #37
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The Best of British - British Slang
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:21 PM   #38
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My thought is to use a different cookbook.

There is no way following this recipe would give you a result that looks like that.

That sauce looks to me like a plain bland béchamel sauce made with butter, flour and milk. Its flat like béchamel not glossy like a cornstarch sauce.

Making a sauce with chicken stock will, by definition, get you a sauce that's tannish in color since the stock will be golden.

Plus the recipe itself is dodgy. There's no need to cook the chicken in the stock. You'll get flabby chicken and no fond to season your pan sauce with.

Next time, rub the chicken with lemon juice and salt and pepper it liberally. Sprinkle with herbs of choice.

Bake it in a baking dish until done. Remove chicken and keep warm.

Deglaze the pan with a little white wine and scrape up all the fond (brown bits) and dissolve it in the wine. Add 2 cups or so of chicken stock to the pan, bring it to a boil, turn down to a simmer and reduce by about half. Add lemon juice to taste.

Dissolve some cornstarch in some chicken stock.

Whisk in some of the cornstarch mixture and bring the sauce to a boil again (cornstarch needs heat to thicken). If its not thick enough, add a little more.

Taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary.

This sauce will look a lot like the one you made, probably even darker from the fond.
Unfortunately I'm not at all artistic or inventive so practically all my cooking originates from a cookbook. I would have great difficulty in inventing a dish from scratch. Also if I cannot get an ingredient I will scratch what I was planning to cook and do something else, I don't like substituting. I recently had to order some asafoetida, some dried pomegranate and some yellow lentils.

Do you think a possible explanation for the method in this recipe is that casseroling in a thin liquid thoroughly infused the chicken with the lemony flavours in the liquid?
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Old 04-10-2015, 06:18 PM   #39
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Ah yes we can have fun with learning different terms and phrases . I used to buy Martha's Living magazine from Costco and I discovered I had a breakfront . I polish it in between cleaning out my mud room with a handcrafted mop made from an aged oak tree I chopped down and homespun wool from my hand reared highland cattle .
When I moved to Texas I had a neighbor who told me she never knew she had a parlor. New Englanders don't give up some of our old traditions very easily.

I read a book many years ago written by an American soldier in WWII. He was assigned to an office for clerical work. The book was absolutely hilarious. It was all about his adventure in England and learning about the new language and traditions. I was reading it on the bus as I went to work. The people on the bus must have thought I had lost my mind as I started to laugh uncontrollably and couldn't stop. There was a passage about when a female in the office with about 50 other people there asked if anyone had a rubber. For Americans a rubber is just another name for a condom. What cracked me up so hard is that she yelled it out across the room. And the poor soldier thought she meant a condom. He could feel his face turn red.
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Old 04-10-2015, 06:24 PM   #40
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"I'd love a fag." comes to mind. A fag in the UK is a cigarette.
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