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Old 04-11-2015, 11:36 AM   #51
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It is also 'funny' how words you've been using all your life you think are general English usage.


I remember years ago saying to an English girlfriend "Caw boudiyax, the milk's gone muzzy it." Boudiyax = an expression of disgust. Muzzy = gone off, gone sour.


She looked at me as if I was mad. I found a whole list of words that day that weren't in common usage.


Budloe, Cheeri or chiri, bouzette, colimachon, we always go down somewhere as in "lets go down St Saviours" even when it is up!, caw chapin, gache, gache melee and many more.
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Old 04-11-2015, 02:04 PM   #52
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Do let me return the favor. (favah). As most Americans know, Bostonians have their very own way of talking. I was never aware of it until I moved to Texas and someone asked me to pronounce the word "beeah" (Beer). Only then did I realize we just don't talk like the rest of the country. And we tend to make one syllable words into two.

The Wicked Good Guide to Boston English

Should you come to Boston as a tourist, I suggest you get the vocabulary guide immediately.
Enjoy!
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Old 04-11-2015, 04:48 PM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
Jenny and Addie , what is "fond" ?

Wyshie yours looks much better and plenty of sauce . Oh and good to see you have Stork in ,it's brilliant for cakes .
I am a bit late to chime in here. But here is a picture of a pan with fond after I pan fried some pork chops.

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Old 04-11-2015, 05:13 PM   #54
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That is the ultimate fond, msmofet. Crispy, concentrated gold right there. YUM!


Wyshie, I too would prefer your dish over the picture of the one of the cookbook. Agree with others that cookbook photos are all too often not representative of the actual dish, and that's a shame. Like Andy mentioned, it could be very discouraging to a new cook.


Keep doing what you're doing Wyshie...I'm really enjoying your meal pics.
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Old 04-11-2015, 05:18 PM   #55
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That is the ultimate fond, msmofet. Crispy, concentrated gold right there. YUM!
Thank you. Makes wonderful gravy. I used that fond to make pork chops and sauerkraut.
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Old 04-11-2015, 06:54 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyshiepoo View Post
It is also 'funny' how words you've been using all your life you think are general English usage.


I remember years ago saying to an English girlfriend "Caw boudiyax, the milk's gone muzzy it." Boudiyax = an expression of disgust. Muzzy = gone off, gone sour.


She looked at me as if I was mad. I found a whole list of words that day that weren't in common usage.


Budloe, Cheeri or chiri, bouzette, colimachon, we always go down somewhere as in "lets go down St Saviours" even when it is up!, caw chapin, gache, gache melee and many more.
In parts of mainland England "muzzy" means the woolly feeling such as you have when you are about to faint.

A lot of the words you quote sound on the French side. Are they Guernsey dialect words?
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Old 04-11-2015, 09:15 PM   #57
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Gee, I know that Guernsey was a contested island between the French and England. And that it presently is under the protection of England, yet self ruling. And that Guernsey and Jersey cows make the most creamiest and delicious milk. I need to bone up of Guernsey and it history.
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Old 04-12-2015, 01:59 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
In parts of mainland England "muzzy" means the woolly feeling such as you have when you are about to faint.

A lot of the words you quote sound on the French side. Are they Guernsey dialect words?

Yes, the local patois. It is, sadly, dying out gradually. It is closer to Breton and Norman in origin.

The language was dealt a huge death blow in the second world war. Many of the schoolchildren on the island were evacuated just prior to the German army's occupation of the island. So most of the children went away to the UK mainland speaking Guernesiaise and returned four years later saying "How now brown cow." and "The rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain." in almost perfect English regional accents.
I don't think the war was wholly to blame, it merely hurried along the process.

For the record Budloe is the name we give to our 'Guy' on Guy Fawkes night also known as Budloe night. Budloe is also a term of affection for a young lad. "Whato budloe, what you up to you?" It is believed that the name come from 'bout de l'an' the end of the year in French.

Cheeri or Chiri is what we say instead of goodbye, we might add "mon vieux" or even say "a la perchoine"

Bouzette is a cow pat.

Colimachon is a snail, I still remember the girls at school singing their skipping song "Coli colimachon show us your horns."

Caw chapin! an expression of surprise, I think it means "my hat"

Gache is a Guernsey fruit loaf, delicious spread with Guernsey butter.

Gache melee is an apple dessert.

I almost forgot baoncetchus, pronounced "bounchose" somersaults that children do.
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Old 04-12-2015, 03:10 PM   #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyshiepoo View Post
Yes, the local patois. It is, sadly, dying out gradually. It is closer to Breton and Norman in origin.

The language was dealt a huge death blow in the second world war. Many of the schoolchildren on the island were evacuated just prior to the German army's occupation of the island. So most of the children went away to the UK mainland speaking Guernesiaise and returned four years later saying "How now brown cow." and "The rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain." in almost perfect English regional accents.
I don't think the war was wholly to blame, it merely hurried along the process.

For the record Budloe is the name we give to our 'Guy' on Guy Fawkes night also known as Budloe night. Budloe is also a term of affection for a young lad. "Whato budloe, what you up to you?" It is believed that the name come from 'bout de l'an' the end of the year in French.

Cheeri or Chiri is what we say instead of goodbye, we might add "mon vieux" or even say "a la perchoine"

Bouzette is a cow pat.

Colimachon is a snail, I still remember the girls at school singing their skipping song "Coli colimachon show us your horns."

Caw chapin! an expression of surprise, I think it means "my hat"

Gache is a Guernsey fruit loaf, delicious spread with Guernsey butter.

Gache melee is an apple dessert.

I almost forgot baoncetchus, pronounced "bounchose" somersaults that children do.
Thanks for that Wyshi.

"Cheeri or Chiri is what we say instead of goodbye," Like "Cheerio" over here although I haven't heard that in a while as I mix with younger peoplequite a lot of the timke..

I find dialect really interesting.
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Old 04-12-2015, 04:58 PM   #60
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I love all the language tid bits here!

That's a perfect picture of fond MsM, but if the truth be known, I'd never heard the word before coming here. Then again, I wasn't raised with proper culinary terms and "crispy bits" got the message across just fine. Whatever it's called, it's sure the key to tasty food.
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