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Old 04-12-2015, 05:07 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
I love all the language tid bits here!

That's a perfect picture of fond MsM, but if the truth be known, I'd never heard the word before coming here. Then again, I wasn't raised with proper culinary terms and "crispy bits" got the message across just fine. Whatever it's called, it's sure the key to tasty food.
"Fond" as a cookery term comes from the French culinary tradition and it's used in professional cheffing establishments where that is followed.

But we are DC and can call it whatever we like, so there!
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Old 04-12-2015, 05:10 PM   #62
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Cookery books tell fibs!

Psst, Kayelle, it's "crusty bits." "Crispy bits" is something altogether different.
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Old 04-12-2015, 05:26 PM   #63
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Psst, Kayelle, it's "crusty bits." "Crispy bits" is something altogether different.
Gotcha . What about "tid bits"?
oh wait....tidbits is one word.
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:39 PM   #64
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Thanks, I try my best.

It is more of a nerdy almost OCD thing that makes me not like substituting ingredients. I do everything by the book in general. My whole career has meant I do everything by the book. Rough guesstimates just will not do.

Drives Mrs Wyshiepoo wild, when I do something around the house it has to be researched, measured and done exactly as 'the book' says.
I research food (and other things) to the nth degree, I earn part of my living as a researcher, but I also like to figure out how to use what I have on hand, rather than go out and buy ingredients. Hence, the reason I'm making roasted leek lasagna...too many leeks, tired of leek-potato soup, hence, roasted leek-red pepper lasagna.
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:07 PM   #65
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
I research food (and other things) to the nth degree, I earn part of my living as a researcher, but I also like to figure out how to use what I have on hand, rather than go out and buy ingredients. Hence, the reason I'm making roasted leek lasagna...too many leeks, tired of leek-potato soup, hence, roasted leek-red pepper lasagna.
Danes use leeks a lot. I did a search on my Danish cooking site and got 831 recipes! Tøm køleskabet, søg på en eller flere ingredienser. Søg efter porrer. I used their "empty the fridge" search. If you want to narrow it down, just add some other ingredients. If you need any help with the Danish, let me know.
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Old 04-12-2015, 10:53 PM   #66
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Danes use leeks a lot. I did a search on my Danish cooking site and got 831 recipes! Tøm køleskabet, søg på en eller flere ingredienser. Søg efter porrer. I used their "empty the fridge" search. If you want to narrow it down, just add some other ingredients. If you need any help with the Danish, let me know.
I never had heard of leeks until I was visiting "aunt Helga" in Munich. She left me a note when she went to work telling me to figure out something to do with them.The gal who orders from the wholesaler really over ordered leeks, so I've been trying to use them up! I love leeks, but really, 40 lb is a lot to use up! And leek and potato soup only goes so far.
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Old 04-13-2015, 01:03 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by Mad Cook View Post
"Fond" as a cookery term comes from the French culinary tradition and it's used in professional cheffing establishments where that is followed.

But we are DC and can call it whatever we like, so there!
I made this post in a discussion here almost 10 years ago, just a few months after I joined the site.

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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I am slightly confused with this word. I have seen it stated several times here on the forum that the term refers to "those tasty brown bits in the bottom of the pan" after frying or roasting something (usually meat). But in cooking school, fond is defined simply as "stock".

In French, as applied to cooking, it is translated as "base, (for sauce)". Thus , by that translation, it could refer to either or both, as both items can be the base ingredient for a sauce, either separately or together.

BTW, I got the translation from this site: fond - traduction - Dictionnaire Français-Anglais WordReference.com

In general the term refers to "bottom" or "core"


Can anyone shed any more light on the subject?
Andy did some research and found my definition to agree with the classic idea of fond:

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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Man, are you ever a trouble-maker!

Everybody "knows" fond means the brown bits on the bottom of the pan!

Just to prove it, I'm gonna check my reference books! I'll show you!

Oooops! Well, Whadda you know!


RP:

Very interesting indeed. Everywhere I looked, I found what you found. I guess we've been using the "modern" rather than the classic definition.

I guess we could revert to Emeril's lingo and call them yummies!


Those "crispy bits" can be the part of the fond that makes the stock that most pan sauces are flavored with, but the classic definition is more than that. That said, I use the term "fond" for the crispy bits too, so I'm not really arguing the point, simply trying to add a little more information to the conversation.
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Old 04-13-2015, 10:55 PM   #68
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And then we come to the difference between sauce and gravy.

Sauce (As in classic French Sauces) are a mixture of fat, liquid, and a thickening agent (usually a roux in French cooking) A sauce is usually lightly thickened liquid or semi-liquid, and or can be a relish, used to enhance other foods. It is usually not eaten by itself.

Think of the 5 mother sauces, or apple sauce, or even catsup. Prepared mustard is a sauce. Other examples include sweet & sour sauce, Peanut sauce, Mornay Sauce, Salsa, these are all sauces. Sauces can include meat, or meat juices (broth or stock) but don't have to. Sauces can be either sweet, sweet and sour, piquant, or savory.

Gravies always use meat flavor as the base (except for Sunday Gravy), and are thicker than are most sauces. Gravies are also always savory.

DW likes her gravies and sauces thickened with corn starch. I prefer to use a roux with gravies, except for Sunday Gravy, which is thickened with tomato pulp. Then again, I call Sunday Gravy tomato sauce.

Comments, or discussions are welcome.

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Old 04-14-2015, 05:19 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
And then we come to the difference between sauce and gravy.

Sauce (As in classic French Sauces) are a mixture of fat, liquid, and a thickening agent (usually a roux in French cooking) A sauce is usually lightly thickened liquid or semi-liquid, and or can be a relish, used to enhance other foods. It is usually not eaten by itself.

Think of the 5 mother sauces, or apple sauce, or even catsup. Prepared mustard is a sauce. Other examples include sweet & sour sauce, Peanut sauce, Mornay Sauce, Salsa, these are all sauces. Sauces can include meat, or meat juices (broth or stock) but don't have to. Sauces can be either sweet, sweet and sour, piquant, or savory.

Gravies always use meat flavor as the base (except for Sunday Gravy), and are thicker than are most sauces. Gravies are also always savory.

DW likes her gravies and sauces thickened with corn starch. I prefer to use a roux with gravies, except for Sunday Gravy, which is thickened with tomato pulp. Then again, I call Sunday Gravy tomato sauce.

Comments, or discussions are welcome.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
A lot of it depends on where you grew up. I grew up in an Italian neighborhood. The Sunday Gravy was a rite in it own self. Except for our house. My parents were New Englanders through and through. We had a boiled dinner that had neither gravy or sauce. My mother used to mash my potatoes and carrots together with a big pat of butter and some of the liquor from the pot. Add salt and pepper. But if she decided to have pasta on a Sunday, we always had a gravy to pour over the pasta. Just like the homes of Italians were doing all over town. I can't think of any dish that required a "sauce" applied to the food.

If you had meatloaf, roast beef, or any meat product, they all required a gravy with it. Mustard, ketchup? They are what you call them. Mustard and ketchup.
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Old 04-14-2015, 05:36 AM   #70
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A lot of it depends on where you grew up. I grew up in an Italian neighborhood. The Sunday Gravy was a rite in it own self. Except for our house. My parents were New Englanders through and through. We had a boiled dinner that had neither gravy or sauce. My mother used to mash my potatoes and carrots together with a big pat of butter and some of the liquor from the pot. Add salt and pepper. But if she decided to have pasta on a Sunday, we always had a gravy to pour over the pasta. Just like the homes of Italians were doing all over town. I can't think of any dish that required a "sauce" applied to the food.

If you had meatloaf, roast beef, or any meat product, they all required a gravy with it. Mustard, ketchup? They are what you call them. Mustard and ketchup.
When my parents brought prime rib home from the restaurant for our Sunday dinner, it was served with au jus. When ham was brought home from the restaurant, it came with raisin sauce.
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