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Old 12-29-2012, 10:17 PM   #71
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Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
...Remove the birds from the oven right away an lightly tent. The ‘carry over’ will raise the internal temp to about 155+ F. This is perfect...

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...Depending on the size of the bird the 'carry over' can easily move the finished temp to 161 F+...
My comment was based on your earlier post (see first quote above).

Your later post contradicts the earlier one.

I'm not at all sure carryover would take internal temperature of a chicken from 150ºF to 161ºF. Especially when no part of the bird ever got over 200ºF.
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Old 12-29-2012, 10:59 PM   #72
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My comment was based on your earlier post (see first quote above).

Your later post contradicts the earlier one.

I'm not at all sure carryover would take internal temperature of a chicken from 150ºF to 161ºF. Especially when no part of the bird ever got over 200ºF.
I thought we were talking about a turkey. A fifteen to twenty pound turkey out of the oven reading 150+ F can IMO get to a carry over temp of 161 F. Remember that the 150+ reading is from a bird that has reached that temperature throughout the whole bird......not just in certain places. Even the bones are 150+ F. That makes a difference. The large bones can give off a lot of consistent heat collectively.
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:06 PM   #73
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I was referring to your post...

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...We used to roast on average a turkey a day and about six chickens in the same oven...
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:23 PM   #74
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I was referring to your post...
The chickens went in at the same time. We pulled them at about 150+ F. I can't recall if we checked the temp after. It's been a while. I do remember they were tasty and juicy and we never had a complaint. I'm guessing the finished temp was around 160 F. If the temp was only 159 F I guess we got lucky for all those years. We bought our chicken/turkeys from a small local producer. When he processed the birds he never 'water chilled' them' AKA dumping them in a cold water bath that was so contaminated with feces and chemicals the water was pea green. He always 'air chilled' the birds.
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:52 PM   #75
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161° kills salmonella in 15 seconds, but 20 min at 140° kills it just as effectively. Imagine pasteurizing eggs at 161°! Cooking poultry to 160° is ridiculously high, and scientifically unsubstantiated. I make sure mine is 150° just to be sure, but even that is unnecessary, depending on the cooking time.

Also, in my experience it doesn't even take that much longer at low temps. I smoked a turkey at 200-225° and it went way faster than I expected.
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Old 12-30-2012, 08:46 AM   #76
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161° kills salmonella in 15 seconds, but 20 min at 140° kills it just as effectively. Imagine pasteurizing eggs at 161°! Cooking poultry to 160° is ridiculously high, and scientifically unsubstantiated. I make sure mine is 150° just to be sure, but even that is unnecessary, depending on the cooking time.

Also, in my experience it doesn't even take that much longer at low temps. I smoked a turkey at 200-225° and it went way faster than I expected.
What some cooks/chefs, whoever, are not taught or do not understand is when a bird is roasted at 200 F for a prolonged time.......enough to get the meat to about 150 F, by that time the carcass has had a good long time to absorb heat also. B/c bones are more dense than flesh they hold that 150 F longer and actually prolong/increase the carry over. Put a piece of wood and a concrete brick in an oven set for 150 F. Both objects exactly the same size. Leave them in for say three hours. Guess which one will still be giving off heat long after the other has cooled. The same scientific fact occurs when a carcass of bones is heated.
Compare the 'low and slow' roasted bird to one roasted in a 350-450 F oven. By the time the flesh has reached 161 F the deeper larger bones are no where near 161 F. More like 135 F. Ironic isn't it. The flesh in actual contact with that big thigh bone may only have a temp of 140 F. Perfect for harmful bacteria. Ever hear "Make sure you aren't touching a bone when you take the birds internal temperature"? Why? IMO 'low and slow' allows for the entire bird to reach 150+ F. I'll eat that bird.
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