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Old 10-22-2018, 06:22 AM   #1
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Cooking for Crowds

Has anyone frozen uncooked shaped homemade bread dough and then thawed it and baked it? It would be very useful when I have a houseful of overnight guests.

It's my 70th in February. So far the provisional list of people to invite to the Birthday Bash is up to 25 with probably 6 or 7 staying over (I live in a large but only two-bedroom bungalow so they'd better bring their sleeping bags and air beds!). Just a friendly little gathering at home - well, no point in going to all that trouble for only half a dozen.

I'm thinking of North African food (cook in advance with minimum last minute panic and guests can help themselves at point of service). I've already started laying down the wine on the one-a-week basis and over here it's the accepted thing to turn up to parties with a bottle of wine. Invitations will specify "No birthday gifts".

It's a long time since I catered for such a crowd - my mother's 80th, I think, so Y2K!

Before that in the 1990s I catered a Christmas party for 140 guests for a group I belonged to - both vegetarian and carnivores. Some vegetarians complained that there was too much carnivore food and some carnivores complained that there was too much veggie food so I probably got the balance right.

Considering I was doing it at "cost" (just claiming the price of the ingredients) and working late into the night boning out and stuffing a turkey with a boned chicken then a boned duck, then a pheasant (do not EVER try to bone out a pheasant!!!) stuffed with home-made stuffing, and made a couple of huge gorgeous raised veggie pies with all sorts of yummy things in the filling as the table centres, a dozen quiches (veggie and non-veggie), quantities of veggie and carnivore acceptable vol-au-vents to say nothing of the salads and desserts, I was a bit peeved at the complaints!
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Old 10-22-2018, 10:34 AM   #2
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Try making a half batch of these and see how you like them before the big event.

https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/...d-butterhorns/
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Old 10-22-2018, 12:12 PM   #3
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I don't know what type of bread you are making, but you might want to freeze a finished loaf and see how it turns out. I make Dutch oven bread and baguettes, with both having a pretty good crust. I double wrap and freeze the bread as soon as it cools. After thawing, I put it in the oven at 300 - 350 for a few minutes to firm up the crust. Just as good as fresh, and the baguettes will develop an even heartier crust at 350 for five minutes.
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Old 10-22-2018, 12:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
I don't know what type of bread you are making, but you might want to freeze a finished loaf and see how it turns out. I make Dutch oven bread and baguettes, with both having a pretty good crust. I double wrap and freeze the bread as soon as it cools. After thawing, I put it in the oven at 300 - 350 for a few minutes to firm up the crust. Just as good as fresh, and the baguettes will develop an even heartier crust at 350 for five minutes.
I do the same - freeze baked bread, then recrisp in the oven after thawing. This way, you don't have to worry about whether the yeast survived and will rise, and it's quicker to get it ready to serve.
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Old 10-22-2018, 01:27 PM   #5
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While we're on the topic, I have two baguette pans, each of them for three 16" baguettes. I make 8" baguettes, which are the ideal sandwich size (for us). I'll make a dozen 8" baguettes for the freezer, so I always have baguettes available for sandwiches, accompaniment for dinner, etc. I have to block out about 4 hours to make baguettes (two rise times, wait, bake), so I might as well make two pans of them while I'm at it.
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Old 10-22-2018, 03:02 PM   #6
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I have never made the bread myself that way. I have bought frozen, whole wheat challah that I defrosted, let rise, and then baked. It worked well.
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Old 10-25-2018, 03:19 PM   #7
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One of my favorite B-fasts for holiday company is rhodes frozen cinnamon rolls. They are DELICIOUS. The ones in the bulk bag (12 rolls per) - not the 6 pack in the foil pan (they are different and not as good).

Anyway - you set them on a baking pan to rise just before bed and pop them in the oven first thing in the morning. Serve them up with coffee and fruit and eggs. Easy, perfect and wonderful.

I have never used any of their other frozen doughs but bet that they are good as well.

https://rhodesbakenserv.com/rhodes-p...haw-rise-bake/
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Old 11-04-2018, 04:41 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Aunt Bea View Post
Try making a half batch of these and see how you like them before the big event.

https://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/...d-butterhorns/
I agree. You don't want bad food to be served!
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Old 11-05-2018, 09:04 AM   #9
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Whenever I'm planning an evening with friends, relatives and neighbours, I go to my party recipe book - Evelyn Rose's Entertaining Cookbook.

This is a book that a neighbour gave me many years ago, Originally Kosher, it is the kind of book that is very helpful when planning a party. At least, it is for me, because. You can plan timing and menus very well. Evelyn Rose passed on a few years ago, but I believe her daughter now runs the business.


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