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Old 03-13-2008, 07:43 PM   #11
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Hey... if you pull the garlic before it is burned...

Just add IT back in instead of fresh. Unless you want that
BANG of near raw garlic! (Yum yum)
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Old 03-13-2008, 07:44 PM   #12
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Good point GF
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Old 03-13-2008, 08:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
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So are you saying that minced garlic doesn't burn to the same degree as a slice or chunk?
No actually the opposite. The finer it is chopped the quicker it will burn. I enjoy the sharp taste from minced garlic though so I have learned to master the art of garlic and heat. Well master is not quite the right word
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Old 03-13-2008, 08:07 PM   #14
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I keep thinking back to Good Fellas where they shave the garlic with a razor blade.
I thought maybe if it was minced, it might "liquify" as it's in the hot oil.
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Old 03-13-2008, 08:58 PM   #15
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The "GoodFellas" method does work, but you have to have extra-virgin olive oil on LOW heat & watch the oil/garlic situation CONSTANTLY, while gently macerating the garlic. I do that when I'm making an olive oil/garlic/anchovy sauce, as the anchovy filets are heated/macerated into the sauce the same way. But it does have to be watched constantly, & those garlic slices do have to be uber paper thin.
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Old 03-13-2008, 11:52 PM   #16
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Try using a microplane on your garlic. Darn near liquifies it! Great
for scallions and lemongrass too.
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Old 03-14-2008, 06:58 AM   #17
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Yeah, I've got to get one of those. The local hardware store didn't have one. They've got just about everything else....
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Old 03-14-2008, 01:44 PM   #18
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If you want to cook with garlic oil which is great for imparting garlic flavor on your foods, I would recommend actually making a batch of garlic flavored oil using cannola oil.

To do this, simply slice 5-6 heads of garlic in half and through them in an oven safe pot with the skins and everything. Cover with cannola oil and place in 250 degree oven for about two hours. Remove from the oven, let the oil cool, and strain through a fine mesh strainer.

You can then use this oil to cook with, or add at the end of your cooking process for extra flavor. The reason why you use cannola oil instead of olive oil is because cannola has a neutral flavor and a much higher smoke point. Olive oil should not be used for cooking, only flavoring at the end of the cooking process because it has a lower smoke point then cannola and will give your dishes an off flavor when it starts to break down.

If you're using raw garlic for cooking, add it towards the end of the cooking process. Garlic burns extremely easy, especially minced garlic because it has more surface area.
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Old 03-14-2008, 02:55 PM   #19
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Lightbulb Jamie Oliver

I just watched Jamie Oliver on food channel a couple of weeks back, performing a Tuscan dinner in Italy. He infused the oil with (slightly crushed I think) garlic and rosemary. He pulled it all out before the garlic overcooked, no more than 2 minutes. Then he added the meat (rabbit) to the pan to brown.
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Old 03-14-2008, 03:06 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef_Jacob View Post
If you want to cook with garlic oil which is great for imparting garlic flavor on your foods, I would recommend actually making a batch of garlic flavored oil using cannola oil.

To do this, simply slice 5-6 heads of garlic in half and through them in an oven safe pot with the skins and everything. Cover with cannola oil and place in 250 degree oven for about two hours. Remove from the oven, let the oil cool, and strain through a fine mesh strainer.

You can then use this oil to cook with, or add at the end of your cooking process for extra flavor. The reason why you use cannola oil instead of olive oil is because cannola has a neutral flavor and a much higher smoke point..
Oil infused with garlic can give you botulism. Make sure to store this oil in the refrigerator and use or throw away within 10-14 days. This is not a technique for anything but short term use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef_Jacob View Post
Olive oil should not be used for cooking, only flavoring at the end of the cooking process because it has a lower smoke point then cannola and will give your dishes an off flavor when it starts to break down.
Olive oil is appropriate for almost any type of cooking, save VERY high heat cooking. It's smoke point is not that different than other vegetable oils. Some people claim it's smoke point is actually higher than canola oil. Extra virgin olive oil can be used for sauteeing, as well as other types of cooking. Mario Batali even deep fries in extra virgin oilive oil!

Olive oil tastes better to many and is undeniably better for you than many other choices. It is what I cook with 90% of the time.

oli smoke point chart
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