"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-14-2008, 03:28 PM   #21
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Jennyma, he is not leaving the garlic in the oil--he is straining it. I don't think botulism would grow in oil without actual chunks of garlic. Also, this garlic/oil mix is heated at 250 for

I did a brief google search, and all the references were about raw garlic covered in oil.
__________________

__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 04:31 PM   #22
Senior Cook
 
PastaKing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
As I do more and more cooking with olive oil and always have garlic on hand, I have followed some TV chef's methods by always adding chopped garlic to the oil for flavor before I toss in the chops or whatever.
I have chopped the garlic fine and I have merely quartered the cloves and it always browns and shrinks and basically fries away. Because I am typically cooking/frying meats, the temp is around medium at the lowest. There always seems to be an underlying hint of .... errrr..... "overly browned" garlic I have even made sure I don't set the meat directly on the garlic, trapping it against the pan where it would surely burn.
I don't recall seeing anyone on TV removing the garlic bits before continuing with their cooking, but maybe they did on commercial

Is there a technique to this? Are the brown bits of garlic OK? Should I keep adding more as I cook if I want any left to dish out with the meal?

Thanks for your help

I love to use Garlic Powder. I almost never use fresh Garlic.
__________________

__________________
PastaKing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 04:34 PM   #23
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
That's exactly what I used last night to get some cut up chicken pieces going, PK. The fresh garlic went in towards the end.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 08:03 PM   #24
Senior Cook
 
PastaKing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
That's exactly what I used last night to get some cut up chicken pieces going, PK. The fresh garlic went in towards the end.

Sounds good, but why would you put both fresh and garlic powder?
__________________
PastaKing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2008, 09:26 PM   #25
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
That goes back to something I said earlier, I wanted to infuse what I was cooking with a garlic taste, but I also wanted some cooked garlic pieces to eat when all was said and done that weren't "browned", ok, burned (lol). This was why I started this topic, I could never figure out how the cooking shows weren't burning the garlic they added to the oil at the beginning of their cooking process if they were keeping it in the pan from start to finish.
At any rate, it came out well and I didn't have to remove the early garlic from the oil, adding another step.
__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2008, 01:05 AM   #26
Cook
 
Marko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Toronto, CANADA
Posts: 84
It all comes down to heat control. Too high a heat will burn the garlic. And...there are different ways to control heat.

Consider this - minced garlic in a pan before adding sliced mushrooms. If you want to brown the mushrooms...when do you add the garlic? Before? No...after the mushrooms have started to brown! Add the garlic and continue to cook. Better yet...cook mushrooms at a fast, furious heat...add garlic...cook out for a moment and cool with wine. Just another method of temperature control.

Scented oils have thier place for sure, but learning to control heat as well as timing the addition of ingredients comes with experience.

A lower heat for a longer cooking will allow for garlic to be cooked out in a pan dish, but adding liquid will allow for this as well. Consider browning veal medallions in a fast pan (in olive oil/butter) and quickly adding minced garlic. It will burn fast, right? Yes! Before a chef would allow that to happen, wine, Marsala, lemon juice, stock or cream would be added to stop browning in its tracks. Then the sauce garnish would follow for a pan sauce.

Remember...heat control is available in many forms!

Marko
Marko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2008, 04:36 PM   #27
Assistant Cook
 
bryankimjade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Ohio
Posts: 30
Wink

I have read all of the messages that Marko has sent on garlic and his comments are right on track. I don't know why, but it just doesn't seem like home cooking to me if I don't mince garlic first. But always hearing cooks say becareful that you don't burn the garlic for it will be bitter, kind of scares you off. Well I had been cooking with garlic way before ever hearing this and I wondered why I never had that problem. the answer is simple, I saute my onions and mushrooms or whatever I am using first, then add the garlic, but then I always add a liquid, usually wine, or even stock to deglaze the pan. This does keep the garlic from burning and becoming bitter. The flavor of fresh garlic in a dish to me is just wonderful.
__________________
bryankimjade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2008, 07:57 PM   #28
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 36
One solution: Keep on stirring, buddy.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	stir.jpg
Views:	110
Size:	144.6 KB
ID:	3755  
PJP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-2008, 05:04 PM   #29
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 383
i use garlic and rosemary when i cook steak. here's my technique:

1. get the pan smoking hot and add-in about 2 T of olive oil.
2. throw-in about 4 smashed garlic cloves and move to one side of the skillet.
3. place the steak on the other side of the skillet and as soon as the garlic begins to brown, place the garlic on top of the steak. at this time, place the rosemary on the steak as well.
4. when the steak has seared on one side, remove the garlic and rosemary, place in the skillet, flip the steak and and then, place the garlic and rosemary on the cooked side.
5. to "finish" the steak, add-in about 2 T butter and baste the steak with the melted butter-making sure to get it all over the garlic and rosemary.
6. let it rest of 5-6 min but continue basting it with the butter over the garlic and rosemary.
__________________
black chef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2008, 04:36 AM   #30
Sous Chef
 
attie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Mackay Queensland Australia
Posts: 719
Some very interesting reading here, from time to time I get asked to test different brands of oil by one or more of our suppliers who are thinking of stocking the product. Some pass the test, some don't, some infuse the product with a distinct flavour. What I have found is that by adding a few whole knobs of garlic one can neutralise any 'unexpected' flavour that the oil passes on to the product, especially when it's new oil, so, basically one can use the cheapest oil and obtain the same end result flavour wise, except that the cheaper oil is probably not going to last as long.

Bear in mind that my vats contain 25L of oil each and that I don't worry about pulling the garlic until I notice it floating about, but, there is no hint of garlic flavour in the product.

It seems to me that their is a definite technique in using garlic in oil to pass on the flavour, well done, I have learnt from your posts.
__________________

__________________
http://cockeyed.com/inside/vegemite/vegemite.html
We are happy little Vegemites, happy as can be
attie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.