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Old 09-26-2011, 05:04 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by larry_stewart View Post
My dad was also an avid gardner which he learned from his father ( my grandfather who had died before I was born). I used to help him in the garden. Now as an adult, i think Im more of an avid gardner than he is. So during the growing season, whats ripe and available in the garden ( and what I am capable of growing) also influences me.

My dad use to garden also but he stopped by the time I was in my teens. I wished I had learned from him. I kill every plant I touch no matter how I baby it or love on it. I have a death touch when it comes to growing things...
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Old 09-26-2011, 05:15 PM   #12
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lol nikki, your rabbit story reminds me of my macedonian neighbors. they celebrate easter 2 weeks after we do, and every year just before their easter they'd get some live animal and keep it for a while in a crate or tied up in their driveway until the day before. then it would mysteriously disappear and viola, easter dinner. they kept lambs, chickens, turkeys, a pigs, and so on.

well, one year just after our easter, the dad goce and son blagoce were in the driveway building a rabbit house with two giant flop eared rabbits in a box in the garage.

i asked them if they were to be easter dinner just as the pre-teen daughter came out to see what was going on..

when she heard me ask, she ran back into the house crying. how was i supposed to know that they were her new pets. they'd eaten everything else that lived in the driveway every spring.
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Old 09-26-2011, 05:28 PM   #13
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lol nikki, your rabbit story reminds me of my macedonian neighbors. they celebrate easter 2 weeks after we do, and every year just before their easter they'd get some live animal and keep it for a while in a crate or tied up in their driveway until the day before. then it would mysteriously disappear and viola, easter dinner. they kept lambs, chickens, turkeys, a pigs, and so on.

well, one year just after our easter, the dad goce and son blagoce were in the driveway building a rabbit house with two giant flop eared rabbits in a box in the garage.

i asked them if they were to be easter dinner just as the pre-teen daughter came out to see what was going on..

when she heard me ask, she ran back into the house crying. how was i supposed to know that they were her new pets. they'd eaten everything else that lived in the driveway every spring.

Oh I had a pleathora of animals growing up... Many of them started out to be supper...but my dad could never say no to me. Of course we didn't keep them in the driveway. I can even remember he brought home a snapping turtle and he had told me I couldn't keep it because it would bite my finger off. I didn't believe him so I coaxed one of my cousins to put her finger near it and it jumped at her and almost bit her finger, lol.
So, I didn't care to much for the snapping turtle.
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Old 09-26-2011, 06:26 PM   #14
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my mother was a lousy cook. she tried but had no imagination at all. my step dad always had a garden. so fresh veggies were a given. he also introduced me to different kinds of fish, before it was all the rage. southern food is what i grew up on. don't cook like that much, to much fat and sugar. i think i just absorbed how to cook through my pores. i will try anything, that i can afford the ingredients for, sadly these days my food budget is not that big. day to day i hardly ever use a recipe. even if i try a new one, i always add my own touch or change.
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Old 09-26-2011, 08:51 PM   #15
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Definitely not my mother (I hate to COOK) nor my paternal grandmother...memories of her stringy potroast and overcooked vegetables makes me avoid potroast at all costs. My maternal grandmother was a very good cook. She taught me the basics like bread, pie crusts, and lefse. Things every good descendent of Swedish and Norwegian ancestors should know. I loved to cook from an early age. As a teen, I earned my ski pass by baking 4 dozen cinnamon rolls Friday and Saturday nights to sell at the local ski area. I don't like using canned or boxed anything. So, I make almost everything from scratch. If I want to eat it, I have to figure out how to make it. Of course, having over 1000 cook books in my culinary library doesn't hurt.
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Old 09-26-2011, 09:08 PM   #16
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Mom was definitely #1 influence. Neither of my grandmothers were good cooks; mostly they boiled New England Boiled dinners with different kinds of meat, or over-cooked roasts or chickens. At least that's what I've been told by my parents (I never lived near them). So when Mom & Dad married, he bought her a cookbook, and between that and the myriad of military wives we socialized with from many different countries and parts of this country, she tried man different cuisines and became quite good. I loved to cook with her. She wasn't a baker (neither am I). Nowadays, she and Dad have different dietary needs and she doesn't so much. But that's where I started when I was still in single digits. Now Mom called last night and said she was excited that I'm visiting and am going to make them a great meal. Told her to consult Daddy and I'd make whatever they wish.

Like my mom, I, too married a military man and have had great experiences with other people who are well-traveled and love to experiment.
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Old 09-26-2011, 09:10 PM   #17
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My mom was an adequate cook, but I learned to pickle, can, make jams and jellies, cook meats and make salads from my grandma and my great aunt. They were also great pie and cake bakers, sadly, that gene did not take.
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Old 09-27-2011, 12:12 AM   #18
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I'm the cook in my family, self taught from my first cookbook and my Mother's BH&G. We had a very limited budget when I was little and no imagination from my parents. I really hate eating the same thing every day, so a menu of 7 dishes repeated each week was not working. I drug out Mom's cookbook and started learning what I could do with what I had, but gave us different tastes and styles. I'm still the only one who cooks from scratch and enjoys being in the kitchen. My sibs and parents hate cooking, to them it's a chore.
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Old 09-27-2011, 01:17 AM   #19
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My Mum then later learning Patisserie in France.
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Old 09-27-2011, 01:34 AM   #20
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My two loving and caring and gentle grandmas!
One from Piedmont region (great vegetable, great garlic, great meats, great risotto, powerful bagna cauda, fantastic red wines and wine vinegars), one from Veneto region (unforgettable polenta, and gnocchi, and those little fried fishes, and baccalà, and pancakes).

I like to remember them here, Pina e Maria, and I want to thank you, jusnikki, for this thread.
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