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Old 09-16-2011, 03:59 PM   #11
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Cooking a turkey breast side down causes the breast meat to be more juicy because gravity pulls the juices down.

Look at a turkey as it cooks. You will see substantial liquid boiling, just under the top skin. Removing the turkey at the proper meat temperature is what insures that the meat will be juicy and tender.

Also, look at a steak, or burger, or pork chop. Where does the juice start to pool up? It pools on top of the meat, not in the bottom.

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Old 09-16-2011, 04:36 PM   #12
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Heard on a radio programme the other day that one should not wash chicken. That doing so, just moves the germs all around. That the cooking temperature kills everything.....what's your take on this DCers?
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Old 09-16-2011, 04:41 PM   #13
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Heard on a radio programme the other day that one should not wash chicken. That doing so, just moves the germs all around. That the cooking temperature kills everything.....what's your take on this DCers?

I heard that on one of the cooking shows on foodnetwork. I'm not trying to hear that...my bird gets a bath!
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Old 09-16-2011, 05:22 PM   #14
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That is correct Ella. The only thing rinsing chicken does is remove any large particles that might be on the surface. Any germs remain on the chicken, but are also transferred to the sink and counter and anywhere else that the chicken water touches. The FDA recommends that you do not rinse your chicken for this very reason.
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:14 PM   #15
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Also, too continue the more prcise route, it is true that the seeds to no contain capsaicin, however due to their proximity to the placenta where there is actual physical contact the capsaicin rubs off on the seeds. So even though the seeds do not produce the heat causing chemical, they are still hot because the chemical attaches to them.
thanks for that because i was just going to reply that i've had seeds that were so hot they'd blow your head off!

ok, how about you need a giant pot of water to cook pasta. you just need enough so that the boiling water covers the pasta until it's done cooking.

or anything with mayonnaise will go bad more quickly at room/warm temperatures such as tuna salad or mac salad.
actually, mayo is acidic enough to cause foods that contain it to last a bit longer than if there was no mayo.
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:30 PM   #16
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That is correct Ella. The only thing rinsing chicken does is remove any large particles that might be on the surface. Any germs remain on the chicken, but are also transferred to the sink and counter and anywhere else that the chicken water touches. The FDA recommends that you do not rinse your chicken for this very reason.
Really? I heard that chicken is rinsed in solution that has fecal matter, which could be large particles. Thinking I still might be rinsing my chicken, with my bleach spray not far behind.
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:32 PM   #17
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To be more precise, it's in the placenta which is attached to the mid ribs and the seeds. If you wash the placenta from the seeds and ribs, neither has very much capsaicin, (the chemical that makes peppers have a hot feel).
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Also, too continue the more prcise route, it is true that the seeds to no contain capsaicin, however due to their proximity to the placenta where there is actual physical contact the capsaicin rubs off on the seeds. So even though the seeds do not produce the heat causing chemical, they are still hot because the chemical attaches to them.
Actually, you just said the same thing I said. The placenta is on the seeds and ribs. Wash it off and they are not nearly as hot.

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thanks for that because i was just going to reply that i've had seeds that were so hot they'd blow your head off!
Like GB and I both said, the seeds are only hot because of the placenta that is stuck to them. Wash it off and the seeds are no longer very hot.

I feel like there is an echo in here.....
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:47 PM   #18
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i always rinse whole chickens or turkeys, inside and out - especially inside, because they are cooked with their skins on. we generally remove the skin when we cook parts, so i figure you're dumping the nasties with the skin for the most part.

but have you ever seen how many bits of guts and goo are left behind stuck inside a whole bird? or how factories process the beasts? they might as well be making auto parts.

one more rinse ain't gonna hurt, and i always wash any utensil or surface directly after doing so with antibacterial stuff, using disposable paper towels to wipe everything up.



another myth: raw foods are better for you.

well, it's really yes and no. mostly no.

when it comes to most veggies, slightly cooking them maximizes your ability to digest their nutrients. if left raw, their nutrients pass through you along with a higher dose of fiber. so it's better for you if you need fiber, but for the most part it's better to eat veggies lightly steamed or heated in some way so their cells can be broken open during digestion for the nutrients inside.

i heard an old saying once that goes that you can actually die quickly from malnutrition even if you ate your fill of raw potatoes everyday.
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Old 09-17-2011, 12:58 AM   #19
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I see people brining chickens all the time. I think it's supposed to make the skin crispier. I guess it's not really the same as rinsing or washing since the salt probably kills some of the bugs that are on it.
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Old 09-17-2011, 12:50 PM   #20
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Brining, with any kind of meat, is used to add flavor to the meat. The brine solution has a higher concentration of salt and flavoring than does the fluids inside the muscle cells. Osmotic pressure equalizes the concentration inside and outside the cells so that the flavor from the brine becomes part of the meat flavor. Also, the muscle tissue absorbs aditional water, making the bird juicier. Another way to obtain similar results is to inject the bird with a brine solution, or a broth made from bones and skin. Let it sit for an hour or two to let the solution distribute itself evenly through the meat.

Crispy skin is cause by heat and fat. The heat causes the moisture in the skin to evaporate, leaving a fat-crisped skin behind. Many people rub oil, butter, or lard onto the skin to help make it more crispy.


I don't use roasting bags because they trap the steam that would normally escape, creating a soft, steamed skin.

Myth - microwaves cook from the inside, out. Microwaves transmit energy by exciting the molecules they touch. The outside of foods radiated by microwave energy receive the most concentrated energy, absorbing it and heating. The microwave energy penetrates the food, but gets weaker as it goes because it is giving up energy as it penetrates. The outside gets hot first, but the inside is heated as well. So the food cooks faster because there are two heat sources, direct energy from the microwaves, and thermal conduction from the hotter outside of the food to the inside.

Just so you know, microwave energy is simply the same electro-magnetic energy used to transmit radio signals. It falls within a specific frequency range. Radars transmit microwave energy in a directional path, and have an antenna that is tuned to the specific frequency that is transmitted. The radar picks up the reflected radio waves and the electronics turns that reflected energy into a displayed reading on a screen, telling how far, and in what direction the object reflecting the energy is from the radar.

In my home town, at the height of the cold war, we use to have a radar that was so powerful, that if you dripped a cow in front of the transmitter, is would be cooked before it hit the ground.

Is there any wonder that the first microwave marketed was called by the brand name - Radar Range?

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