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Old 02-05-2015, 04:33 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I was thinking the same. The United States is too large and diverse to have a national dish, and many other countries have a diverse ethnic heritage, with diverse cuisines as well. Even that list of state dishes that I saw somewhere a while back was pretty bogus. THIS list is more reasonable than the last one I saw, but it just emphasizes the difficulty of the project that the OP has taken on.

For the world, here's another one: 270 Really Delicious National Food Of The World. This list does not even include all countries.

However, I don't want to rain on your picnic. It sounds like a fun opportunity for a couple of friends to share some time together and if it results in good eating along the way, then that's better yet. If you have any difficulties along the way, this is a great place to come and ask questions.
What a find that link is Rick! Foodie that I am, I've spent more than an hour there and googling the recipes.
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Old 02-05-2015, 05:17 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by tipplej View Post
Addie, we are doing Canada this week (Poutine) at the request of someone. And I also have family there...

Any tips on making poutine for Canada welcome. But I won't be making my own cheese curds this time round. Not sure the best way to make my own french fries. And I don't have a deep fat fryer.
Making cheese curds is actually very easy and takes about 45 minutes. They're very different from any you can buy. Here's one recipe: http://www.cheesemaking.com/Recipe_CheeseCurds.html

And you don't need a deep fryer to make French fries. A Dutch oven or heavy soup pot will work fine. You only need a few inches of oil and space for it to expand when you put the fries in.
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Old 02-05-2015, 05:18 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I was thinking the same. The United States is too large and diverse to have a national dish, and many other countries have a diverse ethnic heritage, with diverse cuisines as well. Even that list of state dishes that I saw somewhere a while back was pretty bogus. THIS list is more reasonable than the last one I saw, but it just emphasizes the difficulty of the project that the OP has taken on.

For the world, here's another one: 270 Really Delicious National Food Of The World. This list does not even include all countries.

However, I don't want to rain on your picnic. It sounds like a fun opportunity for a couple of friends to share some time together and if it results in good eating along the way, then that's better yet. If you have any difficulties along the way, this is a great place to come and ask questions.
Of course there's the old standby, "as American as apple pie."

It would teach making a pie crust which would be a great learning experience for newbies.
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:25 PM   #14
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That is the beauty of making a dish in your kitchen, it is for you to interpret and make your own, for instance with jordan and that specific dish, I would use this recipe, which uses cubed lamb... Jordanian Mansaf Recipe - Food.com actually sounds good when I read through it...
Yes, mansaf looks very nice. I had that one down as Jordan's dish. Looks a good recipe thanks. I like to try and adapt a few recipes and maybe add a thing or two ourselves to make it original but still authentic.
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:27 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by CWS4322 View Post
It is not uncommon to ask for vinegar (white) halfway up, and then top with S&P, ketchup, more vinegar.
I was about to ask what S&P was... I was thinking it was some special Canadian sauce...! And then I realised how dumb I was!!!! Thanks for the poutine tips.
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:30 PM   #16
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Definitely interesting challenge. How do you even decide what that National Dish really is?
I am from Ukraine, so I am sitting here and thinking to myself, wow, what would be the truly National Dish of Ukraine? Good luck.
My research into the 205 countries I chose before starting this project, leads me to believe that the ND of Ukraine is Borscht / Borsch. Does that sound right? I've no idea from memory what it is though!
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:33 PM   #17
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I don't know if you have a list you're working from, and I'm sure there are many out there and everyone will have an opinion regarding what's "right," but here's one: List of National Dishes Around the World
Great link, I will bookmark that!
We're planning to make the dish based on as many recipes as we can find, but kind of design our own version. Still keeping authentic though, but for instance in episode one we added chilli powder to the Equatorial Guinean Succotash. Saying that, we also ate raw lima beans on camera, so maybe we're not so smart!
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:36 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
I was thinking the same. The United States is too large and diverse to have a national dish, and many other countries have a diverse ethnic heritage, with diverse cuisines as well. Even that list of state dishes that I saw somewhere a while back was pretty bogus. THIS list is more reasonable than the last one I saw, but it just emphasizes the difficulty of the project that the OP has taken on.
Thanks for the encouragement and link. We're much obliged. I'm not too worried about some debate on the ND of each country. To be honest, it it goes well and people enjoy following the journey, I could also cook multiple dishes from some countries, or even do regional variants. I certainly won't always claim we cooked the exact ND if there is a choice, but we will probably mention the others. For USA I might just do Burger, Mac N Cheese and Apple Pie in the same episode!
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:38 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by tipplej View Post
My research into the 205 countries I chose before starting this project, leads me to believe that the ND of Ukraine is Borscht / Borsch. Does that sound right? I've no idea from memory what it is though!
Borscht is indeed one thing that would be on the very top of the list. It is a soup made using meat, beets, potato, carrots, onion, tomato (or tomato sauce) and cabbage.

Good luck. You're going to needed.
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Old 02-05-2015, 07:40 PM   #20
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Making cheese curds is actually very easy and takes about 45 minutes. They're very different from any you can buy. Here's one recipe: A Recipe for making Cheese Curds
That looks fantastic and is really clear to follow with the pics. I would love to try that but it looks more like 5 hours than 45 minutes! The first bit is an hour and a half. The first two episodes took 5 or 6 hours to film so it's tricky for me to make the curds for the poutine. But the recipe looks fantastic so I really may just have to set a day aside to make them and record it. Brilliant link GotGarlic. I really want to make those curds!
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