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Old 12-23-2013, 02:36 PM   #1
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Cooking Turkey in a Bag

I plan to cook the Christmas turkey in a Reynolds oven bag. I did a trial run with a chicken yesterday. Questions:

1. The bag didn't really "inflate" as I expected it to. It said to cut six half-inch slits, perhaps I cut them too big. Should it have inflated?

2. The chicken didn't brown much while in the bag -- I removed the bag and browned it at the end. Is that standard procedure?

3. I want to make absolutely sure the bird is done, yet not dry. Does the bag seem like a good solution?

Thanks,

Al

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Old 12-23-2013, 03:13 PM   #2
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I have used such bags for a variety of things. Beef roasts, bear roasts, venison, and all manner of poultry included. For red meats, I never cut any slits in the bag. It will swell magnificently and looks for all the world that it will bust. So far, I haven't had one to bust. A good meat thermometer will let you know when the bird is done. According current FDA guidelines, 165 Degrees F is done. Read the temp at the thickest part of the thigh and breast. The secret to cooking a tender and moist turkey is to avoid over cooking. I usually remove my bird from the oven at about 160 degrees and tent it with foil and leave it to rest for 15 - 20 minutes. It will continue to cook. If the bird hasn't browned to suit you, it is perfectly permissible to cut open the bag and brown it to your liking. Basting the skin with butter will enhance the browning process.
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Old 12-23-2013, 03:35 PM   #3
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I have used such bags for a variety of things. Beef roasts, bear roasts, venison, and all manner of poultry included. For red meats, I never cut any slits in the bag. It will swell magnificently and looks for all the world that it will bust. So far, I haven't had one to bust. A good meat thermometer will let you know when the bird is done. According current FDA guidelines, 165 Degrees F is done. Read the temp at the thickest part of the thigh and breast. The secret to cooking a tender and moist turkey is to avoid over cooking. I usually remove my bird from the oven at about 160 degrees and tent it with foil and leave it to rest for 15 - 20 minutes. It will continue to cook. If the bird hasn't browned to suit you, it is perfectly permissible to cut open the bag and brown it to your liking. Basting the skin with butter will enhance the browning process.
Yuppers!
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Old 12-23-2013, 04:17 PM   #4
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I would like to know how this turned out.

Hoot, bear roasts??? you're talking about like...grizzlies...the kind that eat you? If that's the case...I would really like to know what the meat tastes like.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:37 PM   #5
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They would be black bears in this part of the country. I prefer bear to beef or venison. But it can be tricky acquiring it. It is easier these days as the bear population is growing due to wildlife management efforts and the hunting seasons are longer than they used to be. Bear is similar to beef, at least in my mouth it is. Some folks say that it has a "gamey" taste or a coarse texture. I really ain't sure what they mean by those comments and even they have a hard time quantifying those qualities.
The main thing to remember when cooking bear is that it needs to be thoroughly cooked to eliminate the potential for trichinosis. Trichinosis is rarely the problem it used to be with pork. This is due to a number of factors, such as better inspection techniques and better conditions for the hogs as they grow. Bears are neither inspected nor raised for commercial consumption and trichinosis is a very real concern, as it is with privately raised pork.
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Old 12-23-2013, 05:57 PM   #6
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Thank you...as far as I know...we don't have bears in Texas...and I really don't hunt anymore. But I'd really like to try it. I've got a friend in the Yukon...I've been wanting to pay her a visit...maybe I can try it then. I just think it would be cool to eat something where it was a "fair fight"...and if dice rolled the other way...I would have been the main course. :)
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:12 PM   #7
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... I just think it would be cool to eat something where it was a "fair fight"...and if dice rolled the other way...I would have been the main course. :)

Bears have lousy aim. It comes from their eyes being so close together and no chance to practice shooting during hibernation. I don't see how you can call it a fair fight.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:17 PM   #8
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Ok...a turkey can't kill me...a bear can. that's what I mean.
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Old 12-23-2013, 06:23 PM   #9
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Well I have the advantage of technology...my .300 magnum rifle is much better than a claw...but If I miss....the bear wins in hand -to hand combat.
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Old 12-23-2013, 08:26 PM   #10
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Bear is delicious. We were at a Winter Solstice party one year. There were some city kids and a half native country kid at the party. Everyone was enjoying the food. Then Mahican said, "May I please have some more bear?" The city kids were sure he was kidding. Once we convinced them that he wasn't, one of them ran outside to lose his supper. The other kid wasn't sure if he wanted seconds. One or two of the adult city slickers did look a bit green around the gills. But everyone had been eating it and enjoying it.

In other words, no giveaway gamey taste or gamey texture.
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