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Old 12-16-2016, 12:08 AM   #1
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Cooking with wine

I like to drink dry wine. Red or white.

I know that you should not cook with a wine that you wouldn't want to drink.

So, if you like dry wine, do you only cook with dry wine, or do you cook with sweet wines to match the dish you're cooking?

Thoughts?

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Old 12-16-2016, 12:28 AM   #2
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I like to drink sweet wine - usually pink - but I keep Pinot Grigio or Sauvignon Blanc and Merlot on hand to cook with. Except for lasagna - I get a nice barolo for that. DH drinks whatever doesn't end up in the sauce.
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Old 12-16-2016, 12:45 AM   #3
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It depends entirely on the recipe, and what you feel like doing - also what you have in, and whether or not you're a purist when it comes to recipes. Having said that, it would have to be marsala for a zabaglione or tiramisù (which, incidentally, means 'pick-me-up' and was originally devised for people recovering from illness). Some of my recipes also require a drop or two of brandy along with the wine, such as a 'brasato al Barolo', which is a piece of beef marinated in Barolo with a touch of brandy, presented at the table in slices with the cooking juices poured over and thin slices of truffle scattered over the top. I suppose it really comes down to the style of dish you want to do rather, and your own palate, than being religiously conventional.

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Old 12-16-2016, 12:45 AM   #4
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For me, it depends. I like a nice dry sherry in my cream of mushroom soup. A dry red wine works well too. I tend to use dry wines in recipes, both red and white.

As for pinot grigio, it never makes it into food. Guess why?
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Old 12-16-2016, 02:52 AM   #5
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I use a hearty burgundy and pinot Grigio for cooking.
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Old 12-16-2016, 04:24 AM   #6
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Here's Serious Eats take on cooking with wine:

Should You Really Only Cook With Wine You'd Drink? The Truth About Cooking With Wine | Serious Eats
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Old 12-16-2016, 05:39 AM   #7
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I typically keep a bottle of house white and red in the fridge for cooking. Both dry. I don't cook with red very much. I don't particularly like it with beef. I prefer brandy, Medeira, or sherry in sauces for beef. I drink the white wine on a regular basis..it is more of a swigging wine with every day dinners, nothing fancy, but quenches the thirst and compliments many meals..
I'm not opposed to using sweet wines if a recipe calls for it. I rarely buy it or use it for food or as a beverage...
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Old 12-16-2016, 06:16 AM   #8
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The only two exceptions to using wines that we wouldn't drink are shaoxing for Chinese and mirin for sushi rice. We use madeira, dry sherry and marsala quite a bit besides merlot, chardonay, pinot gris, cab and gewurztraminer (our favorite for onion soup).

Rock, we'll have to try your suggestions for beef! Mussels and pernod is a match that is hard to beat, IMO.
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Old 12-16-2016, 07:45 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by inchrisin View Post
I like to drink dry wine. Red or white.

I know that you should not cook with a wine that you wouldn't want to drink.

So, if you like dry wine, do you only cook with dry wine, or do you cook with sweet wines to match the dish you're cooking?

Thoughts?
When "they" say that, they don't mean a wine you personally wouldn't drink because you don't like that particular kind of wine. What is meant by that statement is don't use a wine that very few people, if any, would want to drink because it doesn't taste very good, whether it's just a nasty taste or way to oakey or too acidic or too anything. I don't like to drink sherry straight up, but I love it in certain soups and Latin dishes in particular. I'm also not fond of Marsala or Madeira, but I'll use them in appropriate dishes. I'm also not fond of real heavy bold reds, but I will occasionally drink them and will happily use them in and drink them with appropriate dishes.
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Old 12-16-2016, 08:01 AM   #10
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As they say, one man's meat is another man's poison. At the end of the day it all depends on your palate and what you're happy with, both to drink and to use in cooking. We're all different and we all have different preferences. That doesn't mean that I'm right and you're wrong. It means that, as we also say, a little of what you fancy does you good. I raise a glass to that!

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