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Old 09-10-2005, 08:11 AM   #11
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Hi everyone!!!!

I live in Belgium and use creme fraiche very often. It is not sour cream nor heavy cream. I looked it up in the transation dictionary and it says creme fraiche=creme fraiche... which is not quite helpful. But I could try and describe it. It has a neutral cream taste and it has a sort of liquid texture. I always compain because I was used to cooking with rather heavy creams. But if you are following a recipe and it says creme fraiche you can totally replace it with heavy cream, not wour cream. If you need more help with French terminology, let me know. I'd be glad to help.
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Old 09-10-2005, 04:23 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paolita
I live in Belgium and use creme fraiche very often. It is not sour cream nor heavy cream. I looked it up in the transation dictionary and it says creme fraiche=creme fraiche... which is not quite helpful. But I could try and describe it. It has a neutral cream taste and it has a sort of liquid texture. I always compain because I was used to cooking with rather heavy creams. But if you are following a recipe and it says creme fraiche you can totally replace it with heavy cream, not wour cream. If you need more help with French terminology, let me know. I'd be glad to help.
Hi Paolita!! Thanks for your description of creme fraiche! If there is no translation it must really be a french specialty...like it is no use trying to translate "Mozzarella"!! I think it will be useful in many recipes, when I get a chance I would like to try the recipe Andy gave me. And well, as you offtered assistance in French terminology, I would like to take up on that and ask you one another thing... what is the exact difference between camanbert and brie cheese? They seem to taste almost identical to me... Also another thing... (am I greedy!!) since you live in Belgium... are those lovely "Belgian Waffles" indeed Belgian specialty? If so do you know how to make them? Merci!!
Licia
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Old 09-10-2005, 05:08 PM   #13
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Creme fraiche has an almost 'soured cream' taste to my tastebuds. I use it a lot in place of double cream, to finish soups etc.
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Old 09-10-2005, 05:47 PM   #14
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Hi Ishbel I tried the shortbread recipe offered by you today!! Mmm mmm mmm they made me totally forget about the walkers version, they were soooo delicious!! (notice the past tense... right now I refuse to get on a scale!! ahahahahah!!)

Thanks so much for the brilliant recipe I will be doing it again!!
Licia
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Old 09-11-2005, 06:02 AM   #15
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Hi urmaniac13:

I did some research on the cheese and it turns out camambert and brie are like almost the same. Camambert comes from Normandy (north of France) and Brie is originally from the ile de france (Paris). When I was little my mother would buy both cheeses and non of us could tell the difference. Many times, products are the same or almost the same and just have different names.

Regarding the Belgian waffles, they are indeed a Belgian speciality, and very caloric by the way. Each time I take the metro or something I can smell the waffles in the waffle shop and I am not always able to resist... guess we know where the extra pounds come from. I don't know how to make them but I will ask my mother in law and friends. As soon as I have the recipe, you'll be the first to know. I'll create a new thread, so you can find it. I'll name it belgian waffles.

Have a nice day
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Old 09-11-2005, 08:57 AM   #16
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Belgian Waffles:
1 cup AP Flour
1/2 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. yeast
3 tbs sugar
2eggs
3 tbs. cooking oil
1 cup milk
1 tsp. vanilla

Heat milk until tepid but not boiling. Let cool until you can comfortably place your finger in it without it burning you, or better yet, use a thermometer. Milk should be at about 105' F. Add the sugar and yeast and stir to dissolve. Let it proof until you have a thick head of foam on top.

While the yeast is activating, seperate the eggs. In a warm bowl, whip the egg-whites intil stiff peaks form. Set aside.

Add the egg yoks, vanilla and salt to the milk. Gently fold in the flour until all is mixed into a smooth batter. Let rest 15 minutes. Fold in the stiffly beaten egg whites. Cook in belgian waffle maker until the middle is set and the outside is crispy.

When removing from the iron, either serve immediately, or place on a cooling rack to allow the steam to escape or they will become soggy. Serve with fruit preserves, Cooked apple or pear slices, fresh strawberries, or sliced fruits such as peaches, pear, apple, etc. Finally, top with whipped cream.

When you enter the realm of the pancake king, know that he will know how to make varied and wonderful waffles as well.

Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 09-11-2005, 09:09 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
Hi Ishbel I tried the shortbread recipe offered by you today!! Mmm mmm mmm they made me totally forget about the walkers version, they were soooo delicious!! (notice the past tense... right now I refuse to get on a scale!! ahahahahah!!)

Thanks so much for the brilliant recipe I will be doing it again!!
Licia
It's funny, most Walker's products are popular in other parts of the world, but not so popular in Scotland. I don't think much of their products....

Glad you enjoyed my recipe!
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Old 09-12-2005, 09:33 AM   #18
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Well, the walkers version is the only thing most of the folks outside Scotland know, that is the most likely explanation!! I feel lucky to come across the -RIGHT STUFF-!! Licia
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Old 09-12-2005, 09:40 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paolita
Hi urmaniac13:

I did some research on the cheese and it turns out camambert and brie are like almost the same. Camambert comes from Normandy (north of France) and Brie is originally from the ile de france (Paris). When I was little my mother would buy both cheeses and non of us could tell the difference. Many times, products are the same or almost the same and just have different names.

Regarding the Belgian waffles, they are indeed a Belgian speciality, and very caloric by the way. Each time I take the metro or something I can smell the waffles in the waffle shop and I am not always able to resist... guess we know where the extra pounds come from. I don't know how to make them but I will ask my mother in law and friends. As soon as I have the recipe, you'll be the first to know. I'll create a new thread, so you can find it. I'll name it belgian waffles.

Have a nice day
Thanks again Paolita you are sooo resourceful!! So I was not so far off, just the matter of how people calling basically the same product in different regions...(maybe the method of producing them slightly differ...) that happens quite often also in Italy... And I look forward to your waffle recipe as well, I agree they are highly irresistable and I will just have to do a few extra spinning classes at the gym!!
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Old 09-12-2005, 12:23 PM   #20
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I use creme fraiche a lot for my cooking. In Germany I can get it in any supermarket. Creme fraiche is a soured milk product made from cream and the regular version has a fat content from 30% to 40%. It is the gentle manufacturing procedure which is determining the fine, pleasing slightly sweet-sour taste.
Unfortunately I'm not able to buy creme fraiche in Orlando (well I found one store they carry it, but the price is insane!) so I make it myself.

I posted my recipe in the ethnic forum

Making Creme Fraiche
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