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Old 09-08-2005, 12:33 PM   #1
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Crème Fraiche?

Well, we came across a recipe that calls for "crème fraiche" the other day, I have seen it and I understand that it must be a french item and it is something like a heavy cream or sour cream... but they don't seem like exactly either of them and no one seem to know what exactly it is... can anyone pinpoint the definition of "crème fraiche"?

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Old 09-08-2005, 02:02 PM   #2
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Good question urmaniac. Thanks for bringing it up. Hope to find an answer as well. So many recipes call for that ingredient. Guessing sour cream might suffice. Unfortunately, sometimes I won't try a recipe if the ingredients are not familiar to me, or seem like they're embellished just for the sake of making a recipe "look" good. I don't mind spending money on an ingredient, unless I know what it's all about.
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Old 09-08-2005, 02:15 PM   #3
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Creme Fraiche

Licia:

This might be helpful.

[krehm FRESH]


This matured, thickened cream has a slightly tangy, nutty flavor and a velvety rich texture. The thickness of crème fraiche can range from that of commercial sour cream to almost as solid as room-temperature margarine.

This slightly sour thick cream doesn't curdle when it's heated, so it's ideal for making cream sauces or for adding to soups. It's also used for appetizers and as a fresh fruit or dessert topping.

In France, where crème fraiche is a specialty, the cream is unpasteurized and therefore contains the bacteria necessary to thicken it naturally. In America, where all commercial cream is pasteurized, the fermenting agents necessary for crème fraiche can be obtained by adding buttermilk or sour cream.

A very expensive American facsimile of crème fraiche is sold in some gourmet markets. The expense seems frivolous, however, when it's so easy to make an equally delicious version at home.

To make your own: Warm one cup heavy cream to about 100° F, then add two tablespoons of sour cream, cultured buttermilk, or plain yogurt (make sure you buy a brand that contains active cultures). Allow the mixture to sit at room temperature for 8 to 24 hours or until very thick before refrigerating. Stir well before covering and refrigerate up to 10 days.
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Old 09-08-2005, 02:19 PM   #4
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A German friend of my daughter's gave us this recipe for creme fraiche. Perhaps you could use it.

Creme Fraiche





1 cup whipping cream mixed with


2 Tblsp buttermilk (real buttermilk, if possible)





Combine well in glass jar and cover.


Let stand at room temperature (about 70 degrees F) for 8 to 24 hours, or until thickened.





Stir well and refrigerate.


Use within 10 days.





Tips:


Use as a thickener for soups or sauces.


Spoon over fresh fruits, puddings, or warm cobblers.


Can be used in boiled recipes as it will not curdle.





To make Kräuter Creme Fraiche (herb creme fraiche)


Add:


2 large soupspoons of Parsley


2 large soupspoons of Dill


and chives diced small


Mix together with whipping cream and buttermilk.


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Old 09-08-2005, 02:24 PM   #5
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Good definition Andy. Would like to know from chefs that have "actually" cooked with the ingredient, & if it's unique in it's flavor & shouldn't be substituted or home made. TIA
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Old 09-08-2005, 02:29 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M.
Licia:

This might be helpful.

[krehm FRESH]

This slightly sour thick cream doesn't curdle when it's heated, so it's ideal for making cream sauces or for adding to soups. It's also used for appetizers and as a fresh fruit or dessert topping.
--------------------------------------------------------
A very expensive American facsimile of crème fraiche is sold in some gourmet markets. The expense seems frivolous, however, when it's so easy to make an equally delicious version at home.

To make your own: Warm one cup heavy cream to about 100° F, then add two tablespoons of sour cream, cultured buttermilk, or plain yogurt (make sure you buy a brand that contains active cultures). Allow the mixture to sit at room temperature for 8 to 24 hours or until very thick before refrigerating. Stir well before covering and refrigerate up to 10 days.
Merci beau coup for the valuable info and the recipe!! It is very good to know that this thing doesn't curdle in the heat, as this is sometimes a very annoying problem when you are cooking something creamy. The recipe will be very handy as we just can't find it in italian shops!! I will definetely try it!!
Licia
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Old 09-08-2005, 02:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by licia
A German friend of my daughter's gave us this recipe for creme fraiche. Perhaps you could use it.
Thanks Licia (mamma mia you are Licia, too!!)

The recipe sounds good, especially the krauter creme fraiche... we also tasted krauterkwark in the italian alps this summer and it was so unbelievably tasty!! we must try it!!

Licia(me too!!)
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Old 09-08-2005, 06:28 PM   #8
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I used to cook with it all the time back in England, because you can get regular, low-fat and fat-free creme fraiche in just about every grocery store there...I haven't found it over here yet, so I just substitute sour cream. The main difference is that creme fraiche is not as sour as sour cream, so you can use it as a dessert topping, i.e. over warm fruit pies & crumbles. The low-fat versions make a healthy alternative to whipped cream.

Here are two links...the first will tell you about Creme Fraiche, and the second link will provide recipes for substitutions...

http://www.deliaonline.com/ingredien...che,74,IN.html

http://www.deliaonline.com/cookery-s...ts,989,AR.html
Best wishes, Paint.
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Old 09-08-2005, 06:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paint
I used to cook with it all the time back in England, because you can get regular, low-fat and fat-free creme fraiche in just about every grocery store there...I haven't found it over here yet, so I just substitute sour cream. The main difference is that creme fraiche is not as sour as sour cream, so you can use it as a dessert topping, i.e. over warm fruit pies & crumbles. The low-fat versions make a healthy alternative to whipped cream.

Here are two links...the first will tell you about Creme Fraiche, and the second link will provide recipes for substitutions...

http://www.deliaonline.com/ingredien...che,74,IN.html

http://www.deliaonline.com/cookery-s...ts,989,AR.html
Best wishes, Paint.
Hi Paint, I see you got the puter fixed Glad to see you back
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Old 09-08-2005, 07:24 PM   #10
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I haven't used creme fraiche in a sauce but when I use sour cream, I add it at the end and don't cook it. It seasons the sauce well and can't curdle. I use sour cream in my potato soup instead of milk and some of the other things. It always comes out smooth tasting, but I leave the potatoes chunky.
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