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Old 07-11-2011, 02:14 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
I have posted this before, my dead uncle from Georgia Russia taught me 45yrs ago how to make Beef Stroganoff and the ultra crisp french fries that traditionally go with it..

He was alive at the time, right?

Do you peel the potatoes or leave the skins on?
I would love to hear about that Beef Stroganoff recipe as well!
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:52 PM   #22
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That is interesting about hanging the potatoes. In my experience, older potatoes would result in darker fries because of the high sugar content.

Yes, you fry them two times. First you blanch them for about 4or5 minutes at a lower heat, and then let them sit in a bowl or plastic bin and finish cooking through on their own. These blanced fries will keep for quite a while. You can refrigerate them until you are ready to eat. Even overnight. Then, they are ready to fry on a higher heat to darken and get crispy.

And what kind of oil or fat would be best suitable you think?

Thanks
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:12 PM   #23
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And what kind of oil or fat would be best suitable you think?

Thanks
You are going to get lots of answers here. Most restuaruants use Canola in their fryers. Peanut oil is supposed to be most favorable. I used pure lard in my restaurant for years. They made great fries. The only reason I stopped was because the price spiked and it was a lot messier and labor intensive.
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:45 PM   #24
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You are going to get lots of answers here. Most restuaruants use Canola in their fryers. Peanut oil is supposed to be most favorable. I used pure lard in my restaurant for years. They made great fries. The only reason I stopped was because the price spiked and it was a lot messier and labor intensive.
Thanks, I'll go for peanut oil then and I believe that lard would be very tasty indeed but also a little bit unhealthy..

And what kind of restaurant do you have? Seafood I guess..
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Old 07-12-2011, 01:48 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Sprout View Post
He was alive at the time, right?

Do you peel the potatoes or leave the skins on?
I would love to hear about that Beef Stroganoff recipe as well!
The pots are peeled then cut, rinse, dry and fry
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Old 07-12-2011, 02:18 AM   #26
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This I'm gonna try also.
But how long approximately the potatoes should hang like that?
And you also fry them 2 times?

Also I'm very interested in the Beef Stroganoff recipe from your uncle.
it varies, the pot is important to. I grow 4 types of "keepers" (main crop spuds that you leave in the soil for two weeks after the plant dies, this make the skin thick) I usually pick King Edwards to do this with, just leave them a few weeks or until they feel spongy and look like Rupert Murdoch's face.
Maury's Beef Strog
I have a good cheap supply of Fillet steak tails and off cuts.
Part freeze your steak so you can cut it into 1/4" batons, dredge in seasoned corn starch.
Cut onions and portobello mushrooms into the same size as the meat.
Sweat the onions in a little oil till opaque then tip out of the pan onto a plate.
Clean the pan and sweat the mushrooms till the have lost all their moisture, tip out onto a plate.
Clean the pan, heat a little oil in the pan till it starts to shimmer (very hot) then stir fry the steak for a minute or so, tip in the onions and mushrooms then add very sour cream, keep the burner on max and in a few seconds the corn starch should have amalgamated with the cream to make a soft omelet finish, check the seasoning and serve with the crisp fries.
The contrast of textures between the soft creamy beef and the crisp fries makes this dish and is traditional. Pasta and rice just dont cut the mustard
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Old 07-12-2011, 08:27 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
it varies, the pot is important to. I grow 4 types of "keepers" (main crop spuds that you leave in the soil for two weeks after the plant dies, this make the skin thick) I usually pick King Edwards to do this with, just leave them a few weeks or until they feel spongy and look like Rupert Murdoch's face.
Maury's Beef Strog
I have a good cheap supply of Fillet steak tails and off cuts.
Part freeze your steak so you can cut it into 1/4" batons, dredge in seasoned corn starch.
Cut onions and portobello mushrooms into the same size as the meat.
Sweat the onions in a little oil till opaque then tip out of the pan onto a plate.
Clean the pan and sweat the mushrooms till the have lost all their moisture, tip out onto a plate.
Clean the pan, heat a little oil in the pan till it starts to shimmer (very hot) then stir fry the steak for a minute or so, tip in the onions and mushrooms then add very sour cream, keep the burner on max and in a few seconds the corn starch should have amalgamated with the cream to make a soft omelet finish, check the seasoning and serve with the crisp fries.
The contrast of textures between the soft creamy beef and the crisp fries makes this dish and is traditional. Pasta and rice just dont cut the mustard

Thanks, I'll try it.
And what seasoning do you use?
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Old 07-12-2011, 08:39 AM   #28
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And what kind of restaurant do you have? Seafood I guess..
Well, I've had a couple. My first one was a Trattoria in Italy with my first wife. Then, I settled in a small rural community here in Canada and had a family diner/bistro type place for 13 years.
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Old 07-12-2011, 12:58 PM   #29
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Well, I've had a couple. My first one was a Trattoria in Italy with my first wife. Then, I settled in a small rural community here in Canada and had a family diner/bistro type place for 13 years.
Italian food, one the best..
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Old 07-12-2011, 01:10 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Bolas De Fraile View Post
it varies, the pot is important to. I grow 4 types of "keepers" (main crop spuds that you leave in the soil for two weeks after the plant dies, this make the skin thick) I usually pick King Edwards to do this with, just leave them a few weeks or until they feel spongy and look like Rupert Murdoch's face.
Maury's Beef Strog
I have a good cheap supply of Fillet steak tails and off cuts.
Part freeze your steak so you can cut it into 1/4" batons, dredge in seasoned corn starch.
Cut onions and portobello mushrooms into the same size as the meat.
Sweat the onions in a little oil till opaque then tip out of the pan onto a plate.
Clean the pan and sweat the mushrooms till the have lost all their moisture, tip out onto a plate.
Clean the pan, heat a little oil in the pan till it starts to shimmer (very hot) then stir fry the steak for a minute or so, tip in the onions and mushrooms then add very sour cream, keep the burner on max and in a few seconds the corn starch should have amalgamated with the cream to make a soft omelet finish, check the seasoning and serve with the crisp fries.
The contrast of textures between the soft creamy beef and the crisp fries makes this dish and is traditional. Pasta and rice just dont cut the mustard
That sounds really good. When winter hits, I'm going to have to try that.
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