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Old 10-23-2010, 02:19 AM   #1
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Cuts of beef - how do I use these?

My mother-in-law (bless her) gave us one third of a cow. I'm not so fond of the way the butcher cut it up, but hey, it was free.

I have some chunks labelled "inside round", "outside round", and "rump roast". Which one would you use for corned beef? I already used the brisket.

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Old 10-23-2010, 03:09 AM   #2
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you can corn any cut, technically. but as you'd mentioned, briskets are the most common.

since you have roasts, i would consider doing something more along the lines of sauerbraten.
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Old 10-23-2010, 03:17 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
you can corn any cut, technically. but as you'd mentioned, briskets are the most common.

since you have roasts, i would consider doing something more along the lines of sauerbraten.
But, I want corned beef, and those are the cuts I have. Far too much of that cow was cut into "stewing cubes". There was no chuck. I suspect that the briskets would have been made into stewing cubes or ground beef if I hadn't specifically asked for it.
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Old 10-23-2010, 03:33 AM   #4
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I would use the round portions for corned beef. Outside round first, then the inside round, then the rump roast.
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Old 10-23-2010, 10:27 AM   #5
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One of the benefits of brisket for corned beef is that it is flat so the brine gets to all the meat more easily.

It might be a good idea to butterfly a thick round piece so you have two flatter pieces.
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Old 10-23-2010, 10:33 AM   #6
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Long ago I was lucky enough to have a meat market nearby and I would usually get a regular roast that was corned right in a barrel. I never bought my corned beef in brisket form. They were just wonderful so I say corn away.

Now you've done it. I'll have to have some corned beef soon. I guess it will be deli or a brisket as there's no meat market handy.
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Old 10-23-2010, 11:31 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
One of the benefits of brisket for corned beef is that it is flat so the brine gets to all the meat more easily.

It might be a good idea to butterfly a thick round piece so you have two flatter pieces.
Yeah, that's what I was thinking. I have done it in the past with a boneless blade roast that was on special.
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Old 10-23-2010, 11:35 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhizara View Post
Long ago I was lucky enough to have a meat market nearby and I would usually get a regular roast that was corned right in a barrel. I never bought my corned beef in brisket form. They were just wonderful so I say corn away.

Now you've done it. I'll have to have some corned beef soon. I guess it will be deli or a brisket as there's no meat market handy.
Why not make your own? Then you will know what's in it. It's easy and ready to use in 8 days. I use a zippered plastic bag. The recipe is from Julia Child.
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Old 10-23-2010, 01:11 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
I would use the round portions for corned beef. Outside round first, then the inside round, then the rump roast.
Sounds like a plan.

If you have the time and energy, would you mind explaining your rationale? I really don't know anything about those cuts other than where they are on a cow. I just looked them up in Joy of Cooking. I have never cooked any of them.
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Old 10-23-2010, 01:32 PM   #10
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We have a food warehouse store of sorts that sells corned beef made from the inside round. It's truly wonderful stuff. But be aware, the ability to eat the meat is dependent on how it's cooked, and how it's sliced. The outside round will work just fine if it's cooked properly, that is, low and slow, and no boiling. Typically, the corned beef made from the rounds is cut paper thin and layerd into sandwiches, rather than used in boiled dinner, or as a slice to place on a plate.

While in the U.S. Navy, aboard an aircraft carrier, I once had corned beef between two slices of bread that was so tough, it was nearly inedible (for most it wold have been, but I'm stubborn). This meat was so tough that it wouldn't cut with a steak knife. And tearing it with my teeth was like tearing a piece of car tire, litteraly. I've never had such a tough piece of meat before or since.

I only bring this up as outside and bottom round can be extremely tough, hence the paper thin slices, and I'm not talking printer paper, but rather, tissue paper.

So yes, use you rounds, but follow the rules when cooking. Corning doesn't make it tender. Cooking and serving properly does.

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