"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-21-2011, 03:00 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Thanks, Bob. I think I'll try it without the tomato ( and the creole sauce) next time.
You're welcome....I prefer the brown (sans tomato products) version.... Made with a good Andouille sausage and chicken. Maybe a good chicken stock to add to the raw rice.........Mmmmmmmmmmm
__________________

__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:01 PM   #22
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
I cheat and use beef stock. But, I do brown my meats and onions first, also. I like to use leftover ham for this dish. And tomatos. It bares no resemblence to any authentic dish, but it is still good.
So this would be authentic Ottawa Valley jambalaya?

__________________

__________________
Give us this day our daily bacon.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:08 PM   #23
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,789
Quote:
Originally Posted by pacanis View Post
So this would be authentic Ottawa Valley jambalaya?

Exactly. But, when you think about it, I am French Canadian and some Acadians went down and settled in Louisiana and brought their recipes down there, so, to make a long story longer, maybe this Canadian dish is even more authentic than the Southern Jambalaya.

Anybody buying this load of #@*#???
__________________
Rocklobster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:14 PM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster
It is a version of a dish that my mother made to use up leftover ham, and it bares no resemblance to any authentic dish, but it is still good and I gotta call it something.
Who's to say what "authentic" is???? ....Maybe "traditional"??.... ~~ Sounds to me like it's "Yo Momma's" Creole Jambalaya......Make it and..

Enjoy!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:23 PM   #25
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Browning the meat/vegetables creates a "fond"~~ It's made up of browned bits of meat/vegetables etc. that stick to the bottom of the pot during high heat browning/sauteing ... These particles have a very intense (delicious) flavor. When the liquid is added to the pot it deglazes... removes all of these particles along with their flavors and color....It colors the water a shade of brown....as the rice cooks, it absorbs the 'brown liquid' turning the rice brown...Brown (AKA Cajun Jambalaya) does not include tomatoes...With the addition of tomatoes/tomato products etc. it turns the rice/dish Red as well as alter the flavor of the dish... This is known as Red (AKA Creole) jambalaya......HTH
thanks. looks like I do need a dutch oven to make brown jambalaya
__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:25 PM   #26
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster
Anybody buying this load of #@*#???
Not me!!!!! Unless you can convince me that the Acadians were raising any rice around the Bay of Fundy (Nova Scotia) prior to 1755.....
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 03:29 PM   #27
Executive Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 4,789
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Not me!!!!! Unless you can convince me that the Acadians were raising any rice around the Bay of Fundy (Nova Scotia) prior to 1755.....
Hmmm. Seems like it grows everywhere else in Canada except the East coast. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_rice

And here is a Provincial park about three miles up river from my place, where wild rice is native to the region, in the bay.http://www.ottawavalley.travel/natur...ovincial-park/
__________________
Rocklobster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 04:19 PM   #28
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
It's my understanding that jambalaya... Louisiana Creole cooking (in general), is of African origin - mixed race peoples (Louisiana history anthropology term, not mine) use the hot spices that are associated with southern food today. French Creole cooking (otherwise known as Cajun - short for Acadian - of Acadia region of Canada), of which jambalaya is not a dish, are of European descent and cook the milder but flavorful Cajun dishes, such as gumbo, boudin, andouille, wild boar, and many fried and steamed fish/seafood dishes.

Creole - African/Caribbean-style dishes.
Cajun - French/Spanish-style dishes.

There are no hard and fast divisions, but only generalizations to be made about the origins of this regional cuisine, and no disrespect to any nationality is intended.

(Just as a side note: Before they all died of old age, I had some great aunts and uncles who didn't even speak English. They all spoke Cajun. My own grandmother spoke English as a second language. I grew up eating true Cajun food while learning to swear in this unique regional language! )
__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 04:32 PM   #29
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post

Creole - African/Caribbean-style dishes.
Cajun - French/Spanish-style dishes.
I read that the Creoles are the french/spanish aristocrats who brought to America their culture and cuisine, while Cajuns were the relatively poor ones...
__________________
Hyperion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2011, 04:47 PM   #30
Executive Chef
 
Selkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 3,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperion View Post
I read that the Creoles are the french/spanish aristocrats who brought to America their culture and cuisine, while Cajuns were the relatively poor ones...
Not in the history books that I've read.

My Mother is both a Savoy (of the House of Savoy - a Northern Italy/Southern France kingdom that was independent for many centuries) and Navarre, a French noble family from S.W. France. My mother's genealogy research shows no special relationships, treatment or culture once they reached North America. In fact, my great grandfather made a living during the late part of the 19th and early part of the 20th century poling a perogue (small, flat bottomed boat) collecting moss from trees in the bijou to be used for stuffing mattresses and furniture. Not very royal-like if you ask me!
__________________

__________________
"Food is our common ground, a universal experience." - James Beard
Selkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.