"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-11-2015, 03:41 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,871
Quote:
Originally Posted by jseymour84 View Post
With just my wife and I we tend to not be able to fill up a dishwasher daily. I like to think that entitles me to buy more pans but in reality it just means having to wash dishes by hand every once in a while.
We are also only two and have the same problem with forks and spoons, so we bought more.
Pans never go in the dishwasher here. Jes sayin..
__________________

__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:42 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,830
I'm glad I could help CG is right about the mise en place (everything in its place) for prepping to cook. That way, you know you have everything you need to move from one thing to the next smoothly.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:46 PM   #13
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,777
Quote:
Originally Posted by jseymour84 View Post
Well, my first non-introduction post here at DC. My apologies is this is in the wrong place or not with the spirit of the community.

Last night I tried my hand at pan seared pork chops with a honey bourbon pan sauce, fried red potatoes and green beans. I wanted a Kansas City flavor like you would get at a BBQ so I knew that my main seasonings would be onion, garlic, salt, pepper, chili powder and brown sugar. I always had a problem with my pork chops curling on me, so I checked out some YouTube videos that said to make small slits in the outer ring of fat.

So I get home from work, and I am set to rock out this meal. I grab my pork chops from fridge and still frozen. I set them into a cold water batch, and started prepping the vegetables. I wash and cube the red potatoes and snip the green beans, then set the green pans in a sauce pan with some water to boil. seasoned with a bit of seasoning salt.

I go for my frying pans, and only one clean pan is available. So I figured fry the potatoes since they take the longest, and then pan sear the pork chops and make my sauce. I get the nonstick pan hot and throw in about a tablespoon of olive oil, then start frying the potatoes, flipping frequently because I had to stack my potatoes in two layers. While frying I seasoned with salt, pepper, onion powder and garlic powder.

While the potatoes where frying, I pulled out the pork chops and put them on my prep cart. They were boneless, so no outer ring of fat to slit to keep them from curling. I pull the potatoes off the heat and get the pan hot again and add a bit more oil. I put the pork chops in, searing each side for 4 minutes, seasoning after I flipped with salt, pepper, and onion powder. I also added three crushed cloves of garlic to the pan after flipping. I also melted 3 tbsp of butter in the pan and basted the pork chops post flip.

I removed the pork from the pan and let them rest while I made the sauce. I de-glazed the pan with bourbon and added honey, salt, pepper, onion powder,garlic powder, chili powder, and cinnamon sugar. When I first tasted the sauce I wasn't wild about it, but it got a lot better after reducing. Unfortunately, the honey overpowered the other flavors and I didn't get any heat from the sauce.

Other problems with the meal was not getting all the dirt off from the potatoes and bland beans. Finally, the pork was not as firm as my other times cooking pork chops, but it wasn't pink at all. It had the texture of medium rare beef so I am hoping I didn't inadvertently give my wife and I food poisoning.

Most of my cooking experience in the past has always been just one item, be it chicken, ribs, etc... When cooking a whole meal I found it was easy to lose track of things and that I need better organization.

I definitely want to learn how to make roasted meats and pan seared meats because that is fairly close to smoking, and can get me through the winter when I can't smoke or grill everything. Also, it seems to be a good jumping off point for working on knife skills and other basic cooking skills.

Well I better wrap this up before I start to ramble (too late). If anyone has any advice or ideas on what I could do differently to improve on what I did hear I would love to hear it. The food was edible, but lacked any sort of wow factor to it.
For beef roasts in the oven, Pre-heat to 500F, season roast, place in a roasting pan on rack. Place in the oven on middle rack (do not use the convection feature). Roast for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to 200F and roast for 1 hour per pound.

I live in Florida, so grilling and smoking are year round. I've got a Horizon stick burner, a large Egg and a 22.5 Weber. They cover just about anything I want to do. Lots of sausage gets done around here.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:47 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Antigo, WI
Posts: 19
Ok, so to sum up the lessons learned here:

1) Get everything in place before starting to cook. I am assuming this means put all your seasonings next to the stove, chop all the vegetables and set next to stove, and sort out all the measuring devices, foil wrap, plastic wrap, etc...

2) Don't try to do it all at once. Proceed from one step to the next in an orderly fashion.

3) Season meat before searing.

4) Texture is not a true indicator of doneness. Get a meat thermometer.

5) If you can eat it, it's not a complete failure.

Thanks for all the help everyone, and please, keep the advice coming. At this point, I know a bit about cooking, but I don't know what I don't know if that makes sense.
__________________
jseymour84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:49 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Antigo, WI
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
For beef roasts in the oven, Pre-heat to 500F, season roast, place in a roasting pan on rack. Place in the oven on middle rack (do not use the convection feature). Roast for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to 200F and roast for 1 hour per pound.

I live in Florida, so grilling and smoking are year round. I've got a Horizon stick burner, a large Egg and a 22.5 Weber. They cover just about anything I want to do. Lots of sausage gets done around here.
I envy your grilling and smoking implements. I just got rid of three horizontal smokers, but I still have my big green egg knock-off that is sized perfectly for the wife and myself.

Also, thanks for the roasting advice. My next dish I want to make is a roasted venison loin with red wine sauce, roasted vegetable medley (carrots, potatoes, and peppers), and fresh dinner rolls.
__________________
jseymour84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 04:01 PM   #16
Executive Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,777
Quote:
Originally Posted by jseymour84 View Post
I envy your grilling and smoking implements. I just got rid of three horizontal smokers, but I still have my big green egg knock-off that is sized perfectly for the wife and myself.

Also, thanks for the roasting advice. My next dish I want to make is a roasted venison loin with red wine sauce, roasted vegetable medley (carrots, potatoes, and peppers), and fresh dinner rolls.
Eggs are great pizza ovens as well. Unless you have a wood fired oven I don't think you can get any closer in flavor.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus & C. Batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 04:06 PM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Antigo, WI
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Eggs are great pizza ovens as well. Unless you have a wood fired oven I don't think you can get any closer in flavor.
I am definitely trying that before the summer is over. Pizza is one of my favorite foods of all time.
__________________
jseymour84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 04:24 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,830
Quote:
Originally Posted by jseymour84 View Post
Ok, so to sum up the lessons learned here:

1) Get everything in place before starting to cook. I am assuming this means put all your seasonings next to the stove, chop all the vegetables and set next to stove, and sort out all the measuring devices, foil wrap, plastic wrap, etc...

2) Don't try to do it all at once. Proceed from one step to the next in an orderly fashion.

3) Season meat before searing.

4) Texture is not a true indicator of doneness. Get a meat thermometer.

5) If you can eat it, it's not a complete failure.

Thanks for all the help everyone, and please, keep the advice coming. At this point, I know a bit about cooking, but I don't know what I don't know if that makes sense.
Great summary You don't need to put everything in bowls, like they do on TV. I usually pile ingredients on a smaller cutting board to take to the stove (my primary prep space is a peninsula) and, when seasonings are to be added together, I mix them in a small dish to simplify and to avoid dumping a lot of seasoning in one place. It's easier to mix them in evenly this way.

It also occurred to me that chili powder often doesn't have a lot of heat, although good ones have good flavor. You could add a pinch of cayenne or a few drops of hot sauce to your sauce.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 04:37 PM   #19
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
I tend to prep before cooking as if I'm doing a TV show. Items measured out at the ready to mix in, veggies set to go on as soon as I reach that point with my protein, and pans and utensils pulled out of hither and yon, ready to be put to work. Before I did it that way, veggies and starch and meat would never be ready at the same time.
In Mark Bittman's "How To Cook Everything Fast", he espouses to do exactly the opposite of what you do. That is, prepare as you go along. I picked up his book at the library, read some of the recipes and "hints" on how to spend less time cooking, and decided I didn't want to be the ringmaster of a four ring circus. I put stuff on little plates and bowls in advance and then enjoy some wine while I'm cooking. The food tastes a whole lot better when I'm relaxed when I sit down to eat.
__________________
tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 04:52 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,830
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
In Mark Bittman's "How To Cook Everything Fast", he espouses to do exactly the opposite of what you do. That is, prepare as you go along.
That's interesting. He's the first food writer I've heard about who says that. In culinary school, one of the first things they taught us, along with knife skills, was the importance of mise en place. I don't want to be scrambling for ingredients and tools when I'm cooking, either.
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dinner

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.