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Old 08-11-2015, 05:32 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by jseymour84 View Post
Ok, so to sum up the lessons learned here:

1) Get everything in place before starting to cook. I am assuming this means put all your seasonings next to the stove, chop all the vegetables and set next to stove, and sort out all the measuring devices, foil wrap, plastic wrap, etc...

2) Don't try to do it all at once. Proceed from one step to the next in an orderly fashion.

3) Season meat before searing.

4) Texture is not a true indicator of doneness. Get a meat thermometer.

5) If you can eat it, it's not a complete failure.

Thanks for all the help everyone, and please, keep the advice coming. At this point, I know a bit about cooking, but I don't know what I don't know if that makes sense.
Welcome again, 84! It's so nice to see a new member come back and join in!

If I may add a #6 to your list...? Remove your meats from the heat source just before you think they are done to your liking. As GG said, carry over cooking continues to cook them if they're covered.

Reading through your first post on this it sounds like you know what you're doing, and your pork dinner sounded wonderful to me.

Oh, and to add, I completely agree with those here who prep as much as possible - I do it all the time, it just makes things run so much smoother. Especially with grilling, my attention is on the grill 100% of the time until the meat comes off.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:38 PM   #22
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I (try) to buy chops about the same thickness, or if I slice my own pork loin, the same, for cooking consistency. I don't like over-cooked chops, nor does any one. If frying, it's about 4 minutes per side medium heat and rest 4-5 minutes covered while deglazing the pan, same time frame I use for girlling, a little longer if bone-in. Works for me. I know they say pork is safe at ~145, I am a wee bit old fashioned, I like it well done/ no pink.

I think as others say, you done good getting dinner ready and pretty much it all came together at the same time, which is sometimes difficult to manage.
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Old 08-11-2015, 05:53 PM   #23
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That's interesting. He's the first food writer I've heard about who says that. In culinary school, one of the first things they taught us, along with knife skills, was the importance of mise en place. I don't want to be scrambling for ingredients and tools when I'm cooking, either.
That works for me also. When I am making a baked item, I place all the ingredients on the counter in back of me on the left side in the order I use them. Then when I use it, I place it back on the right side. That way I know if I have used the item in the event I get interrupted. I may not have them measured out, but my system works for me. And that is what really matters. Do what you have learned here and make what works for you be your guide.

Like it was pointed out, you do not have to place everything in tiny bowls. Who in their right mind has a bunch of tiny bowls or the room to store them. I am sure there are those that have a large kitchen and do. But not me. And I don't have a dishwasher to wash all of them.
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Old 08-11-2015, 06:11 PM   #24
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Mise en place for tomato-braised green beans. I used the two-cup measure earlier to portion ratatouille into freezer bags and the beans are still thawing, hence the bowl. On to slicing the pork loin into chops. This will make a quart, so after dinner, I'll freeze the leftovers for another meal.
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Old 08-11-2015, 06:19 PM   #25
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Old 08-11-2015, 07:34 PM   #26
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Who in their right mind has a bunch of tiny bowls or the room to store them. I am sure there are those that have a large kitchen and do. But not me. And I don't have a dishwasher to wash all of them.
Well I'm for sure not in my right mind but I did find a cheap solution that works for me.

Mise en place or without the fancy term simply being prepared is important as it makes cooking easier and less stressful. Especially with the more complicated recipes.

I use empty 2.75 oz. plastic cat food bowls to portion out spices in advance.

For amounts larger I'll use a teacup or saucer.

Not much to wash and not much space to store.

Yeah it's a cat food dish.

But a good wash makes it good enough for me to use and it fits my budget.
Not to mention I love to up cycle anything I can.
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Old 08-11-2015, 09:03 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
Well I'm for sure not in my right mind but I did find a cheap solution that works for me.

Mise en place or without the fancy term simply being prepared is important as it makes cooking easier and less stressful. Especially with the more complicated recipes.

I use empty 2.75 oz. plastic cat food bowls to portion out spices in advance.

For amounts larger I'll use a teacup or saucer.

Not much to wash and not much space to store.

Yeah it's a cat food dish.

But a good wash makes it good enough for me to use and it fits my budget.
Not to mention I love to up cycle anything I can.
I applaud your reuse of the little plastic bowls!
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Old 08-11-2015, 09:10 PM   #28
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When I think of all the bowls being used, all that keeps coming to mind is American Test Kitchen. Good grief! They go through a lot of bowls just to make a fried egg. Pirate and I sit there and count the number of bowls, plates and pans. I am so glad I am not their dishwasher.
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Old 08-11-2015, 10:48 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
For beef roasts in the oven, Pre-heat to 500F, season roast, place in a roasting pan on rack. Place in the oven on middle rack (do not use the convection feature). Roast for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to 200F and roast for 1 hour per pound....
This is a double-yum from us. Since Craig posted this, it's the only way I make most any beef roast.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
In Mark Bittman's "How To Cook Everything Fast", he espouses to do exactly the opposite of what you do. That is, prepare as you go along...
Bittman eats out a lot, doesn't he? He would feel differently had he had a piece of my pumpkin pie made without any sugar. It's amazing what a copious amount of whipped cream can do...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
...When I am making a baked item, I place all the ingredients on the counter in back of me on the left side in the order I use them...
I use a similar method. My to-be-used is next to the bowls, the already-used are placed on the table-come-island that is behind me. That way I lessen my chances of messing up.
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Old 08-11-2015, 11:02 PM   #30
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Holy cow -- or holy cats -- I thought I was the only one to reuse those Meow Mix tubs!

84 the important part is that you did cook the pork chops thoroughly. I doubt there will be any gastric distress from that. Kudos to you!
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