"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-11-2015, 01:51 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Antigo, WI
Posts: 19
Dinner Woes

Well, my first non-introduction post here at DC. My apologies is this is in the wrong place or not with the spirit of the community.

Last night I tried my hand at pan seared pork chops with a honey bourbon pan sauce, fried red potatoes and green beans. I wanted a Kansas City flavor like you would get at a BBQ so I knew that my main seasonings would be onion, garlic, salt, pepper, chili powder and brown sugar. I always had a problem with my pork chops curling on me, so I checked out some YouTube videos that said to make small slits in the outer ring of fat.

So I get home from work, and I am set to rock out this meal. I grab my pork chops from fridge and still frozen. I set them into a cold water batch, and started prepping the vegetables. I wash and cube the red potatoes and snip the green beans, then set the green pans in a sauce pan with some water to boil. seasoned with a bit of seasoning salt.

I go for my frying pans, and only one clean pan is available. So I figured fry the potatoes since they take the longest, and then pan sear the pork chops and make my sauce. I get the nonstick pan hot and throw in about a tablespoon of olive oil, then start frying the potatoes, flipping frequently because I had to stack my potatoes in two layers. While frying I seasoned with salt, pepper, onion powder and garlic powder.

While the potatoes where frying, I pulled out the pork chops and put them on my prep cart. They were boneless, so no outer ring of fat to slit to keep them from curling. I pull the potatoes off the heat and get the pan hot again and add a bit more oil. I put the pork chops in, searing each side for 4 minutes, seasoning after I flipped with salt, pepper, and onion powder. I also added three crushed cloves of garlic to the pan after flipping. I also melted 3 tbsp of butter in the pan and basted the pork chops post flip.

I removed the pork from the pan and let them rest while I made the sauce. I de-glazed the pan with bourbon and added honey, salt, pepper, onion powder,garlic powder, chili powder, and cinnamon sugar. When I first tasted the sauce I wasn't wild about it, but it got a lot better after reducing. Unfortunately, the honey overpowered the other flavors and I didn't get any heat from the sauce.

Other problems with the meal was not getting all the dirt off from the potatoes and bland beans. Finally, the pork was not as firm as my other times cooking pork chops, but it wasn't pink at all. It had the texture of medium rare beef so I am hoping I didn't inadvertently give my wife and I food poisoning.

Most of my cooking experience in the past has always been just one item, be it chicken, ribs, etc... When cooking a whole meal I found it was easy to lose track of things and that I need better organization.

I definitely want to learn how to make roasted meats and pan seared meats because that is fairly close to smoking, and can get me through the winter when I can't smoke or grill everything. Also, it seems to be a good jumping off point for working on knife skills and other basic cooking skills.

Well I better wrap this up before I start to ramble (too late). If anyone has any advice or ideas on what I could do differently to improve on what I did hear I would love to hear it. The food was edible, but lacked any sort of wow factor to it.

__________________

__________________
jseymour84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 02:24 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 9,887
Hi 84. Hope you don't mind me calling you that, it's easier.

Welcome to Discuss cooking!
One thing that stuck out in your post is you cooked the pork perfectly!
"Finally, the pork was not as firm as my other times cooking pork chops, but it wasn't pink at all. It had the texture of medium rare beef so I am hoping I didn't inadvertently give my wife and I food poisoning." Far too many people over cook pork, so you did the hardest part best. That's a good thing!
__________________

__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 02:26 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 16,879
Hi. This is in the perfect place and is absolutely what this community is about

IMO, your first mistake is using a non-stick pan to try to sear meats. By its nature, it resists sticking, and the browned bits that stick to the bottom of the pan are the flavor base for your pan sauce. So try seasoning your meat, warming oil in a stainless steel or cast iron pan, then searing it on both sides. Let it sit in the pan till it's nice and brown and releases easily. When both sides are just done, set aside, covered, to rest and complete carryover cooking.

Use about a half cup of water or chicken broth to deglaze the pan and scrape up the browned bits into the liquid. Then add the bourbon and the rest of the seasonings and reduce. The additional liquid will smooth out the flavor of the sauce.

If you have a microwave and a toaster oven, use them for the potatoes. Cut and toss them in a bowl with olive oil, salt and pepper and parcook in the microwave for five minutes or so. Toss with fresh herbs or spices and put in the toaster oven at 400F for about 15 minutes to roast. Set the timer on the toaster oven so it will turn off when the time is up, then leave them in there to keep warm.

Try braising the beans instead of boiling. Put some oil, about a quarter cup water and seasonings in a skillet or saucepan and bring to a boil. Add the beans and reduce to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 10 to 15 minutes, till almost done to your liking. Remove the lid, bring to a boil and boil off the liquid. Reduce the heat and let them brown a little in the oil, then serve.

Hope this helps.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 02:37 PM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Antigo, WI
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayelle View Post
Hi 84. Hope you don't mind me calling you that, it's easier.

Welcome to Discuss cooking!
One thing that stuck out in your post is you cooked the pork perfectly!
"Finally, the pork was not as firm as my other times cooking pork chops, but it wasn't pink at all. It had the texture of medium rare beef so I am hoping I didn't inadvertently give my wife and I food poisoning." Far too many people over cook pork, so you did the hardest part best. That's a good thing!
That's fine, 84 is a cool nickname. I suspected that when pork is firm enough to not bend when you lift it by one edge that it is overcooked, but I always worry about under cooking pork. Thanks for the reassurances :)

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Use about a half cup of water or chicken broth to deglaze the pan and scrape up the browned bits into the liquid. Then add the bourbon and the rest of the seasonings and reduce. The additional liquid will smooth out the flavor of the sauce.
Thanks for the tips, I will definitely try them out next time! I never thought about cooking the potatoes in the microwave. Also, can't wait to try braising the beans next time, I love green beans and this sounds like they come out a little crispy, almost like when you grill them.
__________________
jseymour84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:01 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston
Posts: 9,272
Also always season meat before you sear it
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:02 PM   #6
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,380
Sounds like you did OK. Modern day pork is fully cooked and safe to eat @137F. The USDA recommends cooking pork to 145F. Pork cooked to this temperature can still have a little blush of pink and that's fine.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:04 PM   #7
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 799
I don't like to have to keep track of too many things, either. It take the fun out of cooking. A lot of times the meal is structured to allow me to only have to pay attention to one thing. I'll cook (barely) a veggie like green beans in the microwave, and then dump into cold water to stop the cooking process, then drain when cooled. When dinner is just about ready, I'll heat some EVOO in a pan, add garlic and maybe some other herbs, and heat the veggies for 2 minutes or so.

I like oven roasted red potatoes. Cut up the red potatoes, shake in a plastic bag with a couple tablespoons of EVOO and herbs, and then bake for 30 minutes or so. All you have to remember is to flip them half way through. Gives you plenty of time to pay attention to the grill. I usually put my wife to work to take care of the final few items while I'm outside at the grill.

It's got to be a short grilling season when you have to drive south to watch the Green Bay Packers play!
__________________
tenspeed is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:11 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Antigo, WI
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
I don't like to have to keep track of too many things, either. It take the fun out of cooking. A lot of times the meal is structured to allow me to only have to pay attention to one thing. I'll cook (barely) a veggie like green beans in the microwave, and then dump into cold water to stop the cooking process, then drain when cooled. When dinner is just about ready, I'll heat some EVOO in a pan, add garlic and maybe some other herbs, and heat the veggies for 2 minutes or so.

I like oven roasted red potatoes. Cut up the red potatoes, shake in a plastic bag with a couple tablespoons of EVOO and herbs, and then bake for 30 minutes or so. All you have to remember is to flip them half way through. Gives you plenty of time to pay attention to the grill. I usually put my wife to work to take care of the final few items while I'm outside at the grill.

It's got to be a short grilling season when you have to drive south to watch the Green Bay Packers play!
Not too bad, about 4-5 months out of the year if you don't mind wearing a jacket and using two bags of charcoal per cook, and if you do mind that, then 2-3 months for grilling season. Our springs and falls can be quite cool but still not too bad to grill in. The last 4-5 years have been weird winters, but we typically get really cold weather early November to mid May.
__________________
jseymour84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:22 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 8,273
Welcome, 84! The good news is the meal you cooked was edible and neither you nor your wife got sick. You're already on the road to rousing success! Also, like Kayelle said, cooking the pork till done but not overcooked is a big success.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jseymour84 View Post
...When cooking a whole meal I found it was easy to lose track of things and that I need better organization...
And you figured out what your biggest stumbling block is. Maybe. Even though I've been cooking for *coughcough* decades, I tend to prep before cooking as if I'm doing a TV show. Items measured out at the ready to mix in, veggies set to go on as soon as I reach that point with my protein, and pans and utensils pulled out of hither and yon, ready to be put to work. Before I did it that way, veggies and starch and meat would never be ready at the same time. Now if I just had a crew that followed after me to clean up all those dirty bowls, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jseymour84 View Post
I go for my frying pans, and only one clean pan is available.
Wait, are you my son? He has a tendency to hide the dirty ones in the oven until he needs one. Keep them clean, my boy, keep them clean.
__________________
... nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have... ~~~ LeBron James
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2015, 03:30 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Antigo, WI
Posts: 19
With just my wife and I we tend to not be able to fill up a dishwasher daily. I like to think that entitles me to buy more pans but in reality it just means having to wash dishes by hand every once in a while.
__________________

__________________
jseymour84 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dinner

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.