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Old 11-22-2011, 10:34 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by TATTRAT View Post
I am thrown off by the maple comments, it's from sugar cane right? It's the molasses that makes the brown color and fuller flavor, I dunno, I hear maple and think of Vermont Syrup.
Molasses! That's it.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:37 AM   #12
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Here's the main different, as I understand it, between "raw" sugars like turbinado and demarara and brown sugars...

Sugar cane processing produces two main components - sugar and molasses. White sugar has been processed so that all of the molasses has been removed. Brown sugar is just white sugar with the molasses re-added in different amounts (light or dark). Turbinado sugar is less processed and still has molasses content in it.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:40 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Effington View Post
Here's the main different, as I understand it, between "raw" sugars like turbinado and demarara and brown sugars...

Sugar cane processing produces two main components - sugar and molasses. White sugar has been processed so that all of the molasses has been removed. Brown sugar is just white sugar with the molasses re-added in different amounts (light or dark). Turbinado sugar is less processed and still has molasses content in it.
that is basically it. turbinado sugar gets it's name from the centrifuges that spin it. Got to go to a mill in Hawaii, pretty cool process, but lots of cane spiders. . .I hate spiders.
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:47 AM   #14
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that is basically it. turbinado sugar gets it's name from the centrifuges that spin it. Got to go to a mill in Hawaii, pretty cool process, but lots of cane spiders. . .I hate spiders.
I did a little Google-Fu and found that turbinado sugar is classified as "natural brown sugar," that is sugar that naturally has molasses due to less processing, rather than having it re-introduced like most baking brown sugar.

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Golden coloured natural brown sugar is produced by extracting the juice from sugar cane, heating it to evaporate water and crystallise the sugar, then spinning in a centrifuge to remove some impurities and further dry the sugar. It is commonly used in baking and to sweeten beverages such as coffee and tea.
There are two main types - Demerara sugar is used more in the UK and is named after Demerara colony of Guyana. Turbinado is used more in the US, is produced mainly in Hawaii and, like Tatt said, is named for the turbine centrifuge used to make it. There are slight taste differences between the two, but they're largely interchangeable.

I have also used it to make invert sugar or simple syrup.
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Old 11-23-2011, 07:46 AM   #15
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So, in a recipe with other spices and flavors, I don't think anyone would be able to tell whether the molasses in a couple spoonfuls of sugar was left in or added back after processing!
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:32 PM   #16
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Molasses! That's it.
I was a bit confused too--I have made maple sugar when evapping sap, and I would never confuse maple syrup/sugar for any of the "brown" or raw sugars discussed....but, I guess each one tastes things a bit differently.
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Old 11-23-2011, 01:37 PM   #17
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I was a bit confused too--I have made maple sugar when evapping sap, and I would never confuse maple syrup/sugar for any of the "brown" or raw sugars discussed....but, I guess each one tastes things a bit differently.
I think they taste very different.
It was probably a case of them both beginning with the letter M and providing a brownish color. I simply typed the wrong word.
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