"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-20-2008, 11:00 AM   #21
Executive Chef
 
miniman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Basingstoke, England
Posts: 4,687
We usually get the cheaper supermarket wines (about 3 a bottle) which are perfectly drinkable and work very well in the food. Often they are the new world wines (South Africa or South America).
__________________

__________________
miniman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2008, 12:47 PM   #22
Head Chef
 
Caine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: CHINATOWN
Posts: 2,314
Send a message via MSN to Caine
Quote:
Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
I think Aristotle said: "If it ain't good for drinking, it ain't good for cooking"
I wouldn't consider Aristotle a good source for beverage reviews. Isn't he the guy who drank the hemlock?
__________________

__________________
Caine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2008, 12:21 AM   #23
Traveling Welcome Wagon
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Somewhere, US
Posts: 15,919
I'm not sure where I fit in here! I don't like to drink wine, but I do like certain foods cooked with wine. Cooking does change the flavor of it a little (or I probably wouldn't like it in foods), so I would think that cooking with something a little less costly (if what you drink is expensive) shouldn't make too much of a difference.

Barbara
__________________
Barbara L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2008, 12:29 AM   #24
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom View Post
I have used some more expensive wines for sauces ($25) but I usually use modestly priced, good tasting wines ($10) and honestly, I don't notice much of a difference in the taste. I will say that I tried using a very sweet, very cheap wine once and the sauce was so sweet, it was almost like candy - yuck.

Recently, I got a box of red wine to see if I could make a good sauce with it and I was surprised to find it worked very well. I also used it in a slow cooker roast and it was very tasty. So I think the common advice here of using inexpensive wines that taste good to drink is very good advice.
Boxed wines are the "bomb" to cook with. No air gets to the wine so they last for MANY months. I just keep them in a cupboard beside my stove and use them at will. They are the perfect wine to cook with IMHO.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 08:11 PM   #25
Sous Chef
 
jeninga75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Augusta, Ga
Posts: 721
This is a discussion about cooking with wine so instead of starting a new thread, just thought I'd ask my question here. I would like to try a recipe that calls for "dry white wine." I have no clue what this means. I cant stand the taste of wine so I know nothing about it. I have never cooked with it so I'm willing to try that. I don't want this recipe to fail because I left it out just because I dont like to drink it.

So what is an example of this. I'd prefer to spend as little amount of money as possible as I will never drink it. I will keep it though in case another recipe I want to try calls for it. Thanks in advance.
__________________
If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown
jeninga75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2008, 09:42 PM   #26
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,390
Dry wine just means not sweet. Look for chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, pinot grigio. In some super markets, you can buy little bottles that are about 10 ounces. Another is dry vermouth. Sometimes you cna get vermouth in Nips. Bottles that are just enough for one drink.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2008, 12:30 AM   #27
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Metro New York
Posts: 8,764
Send a message via Yahoo to ChefJune
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Dry wine just means not sweet. Look for chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, pinot grigio. In some super markets, you can buy little bottles that are about 10 ounces. Another is dry vermouth. Sometimes you cna get vermouth in Nips. Bottles that are just enough for one drink.
Julia Child always used dry Vermouth instead of white wine for two reasons:
1. the vermouth has a lot of lovely herbs mixed in it already;
2. vermouth keeps quite a while after opening, so you don't really have much worry about its going bad;
(oops, 3.) you could always use it in a Martini!

actually, there IS a difference in vermouths. Julia preferred Noilly Prat. so do I. Get that one if you can find it. I buy the biggest bottle I can find so I always have it on hand.
__________________
Wine is the food that completes the meal.
ChefJune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2008, 12:49 AM   #28
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Great idea Kitchenelf!
Love the Hunter Green cabinets as well ;)
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2008, 06:36 PM   #29
Sous Chef
 
jeninga75's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Augusta, Ga
Posts: 721
Thanks guys! I do remember seeing little mini bottles of wine in one of the fancier little markets we have here. About twice the size of those liquor airline bottles. I'm gonna see if I can get one of vermouth (that's wine? I thought it was liquor like vodka or gin ) try the recipe and if I like it I'll get a bigger bottle to have. And ChefJune, how long is quite a while. A year? More than that?
__________________
If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown
jeninga75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2008, 06:44 PM   #30
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeninga75 View Post
Thanks guys! I do remember seeing little mini bottles of wine in one of the fancier little markets we have here. About twice the size of those liquor airline bottles. I'm gonna see if I can get one of vermouth (that's wine? I thought it was liquor like vodka or gin ) try the recipe and if I like it I'll get a bigger bottle to have. And ChefJune, how long is quite a while. A year? More than that?
Yes, it will last a year or more with no problem! And you don't need to refrigerate it either. Vermouth is fortified wine - a bit different than regular wine. Fortified wines have been flavored with brandy and some have been flavored with spices, roots, herbs, such as Vermouth, and quite perfect for cooking!
__________________

__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:11 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.