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Old 10-29-2010, 11:01 AM   #21
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Does anyone have a use for the big leaves on the outside of cauliflower? The little, tender ones are fine as is. Right now, they just go in the compost.
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:04 PM   #22
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I make veg stock all the time. It is quick, easy, uses all the trim, and flavors anything better than anything canned or boxed I know of. (I also make fish and chic stock all the time too, as bones come available.) Roasted tomato soup with a veg stock base with a touch of ginger background is heaven! But so is butternut squash ...

I thicken with pureed potato or brown rice quite often (so I make extra when I cook them.) I use little cream or butter so much of this is low cal or fat and very healthy. That being said, I use real cream and butter when called for because it is real food.

I have a whole new appreciation for seasonality, freshness, and produce of all types in general since I began seriously cooking this way. I also maintain my weight much more easily (not an issue for everybody, but for some of us.)
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:10 PM   #23
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Does anyone have a use for the big leaves on the outside of cauliflower? The little, tender ones are fine as is. Right now, they just go in the compost.
Some of those tougher leaves have not been part of the human diet for quite a while I would expect.

My friendly neighborhood organic free range pasture farmer expects to use such as compost or feed for livestock. Whatever I can't use I drop off and somehow it gets properly "recycled" .

Not everyone can do this,but even a small compost will feed your flowers and reduce your waste nicely.
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:13 PM   #24
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I make my chicken stock in the pressure cooker. By the time the stock is done, the bones are soft. I put all the bones/veggies into a freezer bag and dole it out bit by bit to the dogs for a treat. (Not all at once--causes digestive upsets. Ask me how I know.)
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:16 PM   #25
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I save some veggie leftovers in the freezer. You can't buy just enough celery for a mire poix so I buy the least expensive offering, usually a whole bunch with leaves, and freeze the leftovers for stock, mirepoix, soup, etc. The same goes for carrots and parsley stems.

I save chicken bones and scraps for stock just as most of us do.

If I had the energy, I'd never buy anything but whole chickens and turkeys on sale and butcher them myself. Where I shop, whole poultry is always the cheapest per pound and we eat all parts of the chicken (white and dark meats).
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Old 10-29-2010, 02:19 PM   #26
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I make my chicken stock in the pressure cooker. By the time the stock is done, the bones are soft. I put all the bones/veggies into a freezer bag and dole it out bit by bit to the dogs for a treat. (Not all at once--causes digestive upsets. Ask me how I know.)
You do the opposite from me, making small batches frequently. I don't make stock until I can fill a 20-quart stock pot with bones. I guess I'd rather gear up to do it once in a great while. Personal preference.
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Old 10-29-2010, 04:20 PM   #27
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Save mushroom stems, chopped roughly and freeze to use as filler for meatloaf. Much tastier than the canned (YUK) rubber ones.

I don't use the chicken bones for stock any more. When I need stock I fill a 3 quart pot with water and add a frozen chicken thigh, season the water with salt, a celery stalk from the freezer along with bay leaf. a chopped onion and garlic. Afterward I have chicken meat already cooked to put in the freezer for later use, chicken stock for my current need, and more stock to freeze for next time. The bones I just throw away.

If I had a whole chicken or turkey carcass, then I'd make my stock using the bones along with any bits of meat clinging to the bones.
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Old 10-29-2010, 04:36 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robo410 View Post
Some of those tougher leaves have not been part of the human diet for quite a while I would expect.

My friendly neighborhood organic free range pasture farmer expects to use such as compost or feed for livestock. Whatever I can't use I drop off and somehow it gets properly "recycled" .

Not everyone can do this,but even a small compost will feed your flowers and reduce your waste nicely.
Well, the compost is where they go now. I just wanted to make sure there wasn't a better use for them, like the radish greens.
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Old 10-29-2010, 11:29 PM   #29
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it's past the season for this year, but chicken necks and backs are great for crabbing.

lol, or from what i've seen on swamp people on the history channel, they're good for alligators too.

but seriously, my adopted grandfather always kept a bag in the garage freezer of any leftover chicken necks and backs.

tie them into a trap and drop it next to a grass patch in about 3 to 5 feet of water when the tide is changing. you'll see the crabs move out of the grass and onto the chicken in no time.

as the water gets deeper, you'll be able to see bits of chicken and oil float to the surface indicating there's crabs on.

and then go home, clean them, and toss in basil and gralic tomato sauce just before you call me for dinner.
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Old 10-30-2010, 01:03 AM   #30
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it's past the season for this year, but chicken necks and backs are great for crabbing.
The only way to catch crabs here in Montana is down at the hole in the wall bar...
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