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Old 05-23-2011, 05:07 PM   #1
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Dough Rising, umm NOT!

I tried making pizza dough.
3 1/4 C Flour
1/4 Oilve Oil
Scant 2 Tbsp Of Salt
1 1/2 tsp Sugar
1/4oz pack of active yeast

Was extremely sticky,,needed to add flour to the board when I worked it. I oiled it,put it in a big bowl,covered it and put it in the microwave to let it rise.no,,I did not cook it in the microwave.but it`s been an hr and it doesn`t seem to be rising at all. Why would this be?

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Old 05-23-2011, 05:13 PM   #2
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If you used active dry yeast, It's usually bloomed in warm sugar water before mixing in the oil, salt and flour.

Did you check the expiration date for the yeast?
Was the water too hot - over 110 F?
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Old 05-23-2011, 05:13 PM   #3
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did you use active dry yeast? if you are, you might want to proof it first before adding it to the flour. you'll need to heat up your water to 85 degrees, add some sugar (doesn't need much) and put your yeast in it, and after 10-15 minutes if it foams up at the top then it's alive, otherwise the yeast is dead.

at this point, you can put the dough uncovered in the oven, and also put a bowl of hot water (just reached boiling) in it a little further from the dough. the dough should rise pretty well under this condition if it's still alive.
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Old 05-23-2011, 05:17 PM   #4
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Im sorry I neglected to mention I did proof it and it foamed up.. It could be possible that the water may have been 115 degrees out of the tap.
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Old 05-23-2011, 06:39 PM   #5
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If it foamed up, then that's a good sign. The yeast is good.

If it's cold in your kitchen, it could take a long time to rise.
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Old 05-23-2011, 06:50 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
If you used active dry yeast, It's usually bloomed in warm sugar water before mixing in the oil, salt and flour.

Did you check the expiration date for the yeast?
Was the water too hot - over 110 F?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperion View Post
did you use active dry yeast? if you are, you might want to proof it first before adding it to the flour. you'll need to heat up your water to 85 degrees, add some sugar (doesn't need much) and put your yeast in it, and after 10-15 minutes if it foams up at the top then it's alive, otherwise the yeast is dead.

at this point, you can put the dough uncovered in the oven, and also put a bowl of hot water (just reached boiling) in it a little further from the dough. the dough should rise pretty well under this condition if it's still alive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
If it foamed up, then that's a good sign. The yeast is good.

If it's cold in your kitchen, it could take a long time to rise.
Didn`t seem to rise much,,,I tried stretching it into a circle,,but it was very resistant to being stretched,,so I waited another 5 -10 mins still very resistant,..so I don`t know what this means.
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Old 05-23-2011, 07:44 PM   #7
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did you use tap water? I wouldn't use it because of the chlorine that might kill the yeast. I always use mineral water out of bottles
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:57 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scattergun2570 View Post
I tried making pizza dough.
3 1/4 C Flour
1/4 Oilve Oil
Scant 2 Tbsp Of Salt
1 1/2 tsp Sugar
1/4oz pack of active yeast

Was extremely sticky,,needed to add flour to the board when I worked it. I oiled it,put it in a big bowl,covered it and put it in the microwave to let it rise.no,,I did not cook it in the microwave.but it`s been an hr and it doesn`t seem to be rising at all. Why would this be?
It looks like too much salt. Two tablespoons is over twice as much as I use with 4 cups of flour.

Josie
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperion View Post
did you use tap water? I wouldn't use it because of the chlorine that might kill the yeast. I always use mineral water out of bottles
I believe pizzerias use tap.
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josie1945 View Post
It looks like too much salt. Two tablespoons is over twice as much as I use with 4 cups of flour.

Josie
Salt would affect the elasticity?
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