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Old 08-25-2010, 05:23 PM   #1
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Dry pinto beans?

How many hours should I soak dry pinto beans? I'm making pinto beans and rice tomorrow. (I've all ways used canned before.)

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Old 08-25-2010, 05:33 PM   #2
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I've never soaked mine. I rinse them clean and cover them in about two inches of water and bring to a boil. I then strain them and add fresh water, thick sliced bacon, garlic. Bring to boil and simmer an our and a half. Then add quarter sliced onion and two chicken bullion cubes. Simmer till done, add pepper and salt if needed. About two, two and a half hours.
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:40 PM   #3
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Follow the package directions.

Typically there are two choices for dry beans. One is to soak them overnight in a pot of water. The other is to bring them to a boil for two minutes then let them sit for two hours.

Phil's process is similar to the second option I listed.
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:40 PM   #4
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I usally soak my beans overnight. (start them around 9 PM before I go to bed and they are ready in the morning when I'm ready to cook around 6 or 7 AM
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:43 PM   #5
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I usually soak mine overnite and discard the water.
I add 1-2 yellow onions
2-3 bayleaqves
black pepper
1-2 tablespoons chopped garlic.
1-2 cubes mexican chicken boullion.

i don't add salt until they are about half done.

Sometimes a smoked ham hock is good too.

I usaully let the them cook about 5-6 hours.
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:44 PM   #6
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I think adding salt or a salty product to a pot of simmering beans makes them tough. I simply soak over night in fresh water, change the water just before transferring to the cooking pot and add the onion, herbs while cooking, then add the bacon or salt the final half hour or so.
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Old 08-25-2010, 05:51 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
I think adding salt or a salty product to a pot of simmering beans makes them tough. I simply soak over night in fresh water, change the water just before transferring to the cooking pot and add the onion, herbs while cooking, then add the bacon or salt the final half hour or so.
I think the toughness comes from acidic ingredients, not salt. If you don't salt your beans, they won't taste as good. Acidic ingredients such as tomato or tomatillo should be added later in the process.
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Old 08-25-2010, 06:03 PM   #8
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This is from the Vegan Gourmet:
***************************************
NO SALT When Cooking Dried Beans
Add NO SALT until the beans are tender and cooked completely. Adding salt will prevent the beans from absorbing water. This is because a bean has an opening that is large enough for water molecules to enter it, but salt molecules are larger and will plug the bean opening, preventing the water to enter... thus you have HARD beans that never seem to cook right. Some say the bean is TOUGH, but the scientific reality is that the bean only got to absorb the water you soaked it in and not the water you cooked it in.

I could get more scientific, but if you cook a batch of beans with and without salt, your tongue will taste and feel the difference in the beans.

So add the salt and seasonings AFTER the beans are tender and the consistency you want the finished recipe to represent.
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Old 08-25-2010, 06:05 PM   #9
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Thanks for all the good ideas everybody! I think I'll just try try the over night soak this time as I all ready have a recipe to use them in. But I'm definitely gonna try some of the other ideas another time.
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Old 08-25-2010, 06:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selkie View Post
This is from the Vegan Gourmet:
***************************************
NO SALT When Cooking Dried Beans
Add NO SALT until the beans are tender and cooked completely. Adding salt will prevent the beans from absorbing water. This is because a bean has an opening that is large enough for water molecules to enter it, but salt molecules are larger and will plug the bean opening, preventing the water to enter... thus you have HARD beans that never seem to cook right. Some say the bean is TOUGH, but the scientific reality is that the bean only got to absorb the water you soaked it in and not the water you cooked it in.

I could get more scientific, but if you cook a batch of beans with and without salt, your tongue will taste and feel the difference in the beans.

So add the salt and seasonings AFTER the beans are tender and the consistency you want the finished recipe to represent.

DUELING SOURCES!!!

Common Bean Myths The captious vegetarian
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