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Old 10-09-2006, 11:52 AM   #1
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Dry White Wine Substitution For An AA Member

I Want To Make Coquilles St. Jacques. It Is A Scallop Dish In A Cream, Lemon And Dry White Wine Sauce. What Do I Do For A Substitute For The White Wine?

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Old 10-09-2006, 11:57 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamabailly
I Want To Make A Coquillews St. Jacques. It Is A Scallop Dish In A Cream, Lemon And Dry White Wine Sauce. What Do I Do For A Substitute For The White Wine?
You can try "verjus" if you can get it

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Verjus.htm
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Old 10-09-2006, 12:06 PM   #3
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There is really no good substitute if you are trying to cook totally without alcohol.

You can use chicken broth but it won't be the same.

You could use vermouth but it won't be the same.

You could use marsala but it won't be the same.

Back to if it's the alcohol you want to avoid you may even try a bit of apple cider. That't probably what I would chose, apple cider or apple juice. It at least has some flavor wherein the chicken broth will get lost.

Does this help you?
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Old 10-09-2006, 12:08 PM   #4
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or perhaps unsweetened grape juice if there is such as thing?
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Old 10-09-2006, 12:34 PM   #5
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To completely avoid alcohol, use fish or chicken broth in the same quantity as the wine.
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Old 10-09-2006, 12:56 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seven S
You can try "verjus" if you can get it

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Verjus.htm
Seven - the article talks an awful lot of how you can use more of this stuff than lemon or vinegar and also calls it a flavor enhancer. So, I have a couple questions. Is it a vinegar type thing? Is it loaded with sodium like a cooking wine? Thanks - it's just hard to tell exactly what it does without ever having tasted it.

It doesn't really say to use it in place of wine - it says it doesn't distort the wine taste that you are drinking.

Quote:
Because verjus is made from wine grapes and shares the same acid-base as wine, it is an elegant and delicate alternative to vinegar and lemon juice as it is “wine friendly” and will not distort the essence of the wine you serve.
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Old 10-09-2006, 01:34 PM   #7
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Verjus is an acidic unfermented grape product, though crab apples can be used too. I've never seen it in my area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verjus

But a non-alcoholic wine is probably next best thing.

As I rarely have alcohol around, I usually use a triple combo to replace white wine in cooking. A splash of apple juice for fruity sweetness, some stock for body and most of the liquid and a squeeze of lemon at the end for acidity and fruitiness.

For red wines, I substitute as above except for some balsamic or a good red wine vinegar instead of the lemon juice.

I think the real alcohol is worth it in some cases. A dish where a specific alcohol is the critical flavor (Veal Marsala for example). I also think red wine makes a great improvement to simmered italian tomato sauces.

And the Shiao Xing wine for chinese cooking is critical to the flavors there too, though a dry sherry works pretty well. Still alcohol though.

thymeless
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Old 10-09-2006, 01:38 PM   #8
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OK, I just changed the title of this thread - the "AA" got lost as one of the a's was not capitalized and it lost the AA meaning.

In this instance I would do what thymeless said reference the apple juice, chicken broth, and lemon - sounds like the perfect combination.

As far as proportions thymeless would you use a tad more apple juice than chicken broth?
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Old 10-09-2006, 01:42 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
Seven - the article talks an awful lot of how you can use more of this stuff than lemon or vinegar and also calls it a flavor enhancer.
The article also says: "Used wherever vinegar and white wine are used in cooking, Verjuice is versatile, delicious and refreshing."

No, it isnt loaded with sodium like a cooking wine would be and it has a tart-like acidic taste, think of tasting a chardonnay without the alcohol and perhaps a little more concentrated. At a restaurant i worked, we made a two tone tomato gazpacho, one red and one yellow, and served in the same bowl, since the two were the same density, when served properly they held their positions (like a yin yang symbol) in the bowl until the customer stirred it. The recipes for both were similar except for the use of the red tomatoes substituting the yellow in the other recipe - but in one we used white wine and in the other verjus, they were used in the same proportion. I believe it to be as good a substitute as any other mentioned here, if not better, however the availability of it is another issue altogether.

mamabailly: If the coquille st jacques recipe you are using calls for reducing the white wine, i would use the verjus as is without reduction. in other words, add the amount of verjus that you would have ended up with if the white wine had been reduced.
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Old 10-09-2006, 01:44 PM   #10
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is there no way you can heat this wine and drive off the alc (it has a lower BP than the rest of the liquid), and then use it?

the best way would be a ban marie(sp?) in effect a double boiler usiing hot water to heat the wine in a bowl, waters BP is 100c alc is something like 78-79c, that way you don`t risk overheating or tainting the wine, you simply remove the ethanol :)

you could also do large batches of this and store it too, it will freeze quite nicely also :)
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