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Old 06-01-2014, 05:43 PM   #161
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.

Mind you, I can remember going shopping with my aunt when I was very small and eggs being put in a paper bag which was really hazardous. Yes, I am truly ancient.
MC, as a child it was my job to put the eggs into paper bags in our "mom & pop grocery store". They were huge "double yolkers" and we sold them in bags of a half dozen. I am truly ancient too.
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:45 PM   #162
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Thought this was an interesting article:

Why English Eggs Are Way Different From American Ones
That article was really interesting. We are often told that our practices are inferior to American ones but it's not often that we're told that our food hygiene rules are tighter than American ones.

'Fridges here always come with egg racks but we are frequently told by the food
cognoscenti
not to store our eggs in the 'fridge.
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:54 PM   #163
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MC, as a child it was my job to put the eggs into paper bags in our "mom & pop grocery store". They were huge "double yolkers" and we sold them in bags of a half dozen. I am truly ancient too.
When I was little we got our eggs from the local farmer who supplied our milk and butter. A lot of those were double yolkers.

I get my eggs from a friend now. Quite often she will say "These come with Daisy's (or Mildred's etc,.) compliments. I rather like the idea of my eggs being "named".
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:56 PM   #164
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[QUOTE CarolPa] Why is it that some eggs shells seem to be so thin and others so thick?
I think that may be due to hen health...but I am not sure.[/QUOTE]I was told many years ago that it was to do with the hen's diet, which would tie in with the health issue.
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:58 PM   #165
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When I was little we got our eggs from the local farmer who supplied our milk and butter. A lot of those were double yolkers.

I get my eggs from a friend now. Quite often she will say "These come with Daisy's (or Mildred's etc,.) compliments. I rather like the idea of my eggs being "named".
Each of my hens lays eggs that have a very distinct "egg print." I can tell which lady laid each egg and for my friend who has young children, I always make a point of telling the boys which lady laid which egg (These are the boys that cry "oh goodie! REAL eggs" when they get their cartons). It has gotten so the boys can recognize Myrtle's egg, Jezzabelle's egg, Pearl's, Opal's and Miss Betty White's. They love it that the eggs come from hens with names. I like to think that the experience of getting eggs from "the egg lady" will have a lasting impact on how these boys view from where their food comes when they are adults. (And the boys loving coming out to the "country" to see the girls).
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:09 PM   #166
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I think that may be due to hen health...but I am not sure.
Brown shells are thicker than white shells. RIR (Rhode Island Reds) hens lay brown eggs. That's why New Englanders have mostly RIR. [/QUOTE]Okay, I'm going to answer the "thickness of the shell" question. All hens, regardless of age or breed produce the same amount of shell. Small eggs will have thicker shells. Eggs from more mature hens, have a thinner shell. It also has to do with the balance of calcium in the hen's diet. It does not have to do with the health of the hen, to my knowledge. I found it interesting that regardless of the size of egg laid, the amount of shell is the same. I have, however, found that my Plymouth Rocks laid smaller eggs than the RIRs and their shells were, consequently thicker. So yes, some breeds lay smaller eggs and those eggs will have thicker shells. My hens lay large-jumbo eggs, to "off the grading scale" eggs, so I'm probably not a good source to ask! And, the amount of water each hen needs per day is the same amount of liquid in an egg. They can go without food (witness broody hens), but they cannot go without water for 24 hours.

How many eggs a hen lays in her lifetime depends on breed. Some breeds are prolific layers, others are poor layers. The breeds I selected are supposed to be excellent/prolific layers and lay anywhere from 260-340 eggs/year for the first 18 months, fewer eggs annually following the first molt. Myrtle (now 4+) is in peri-henopause. She doesn't lay daily, but she consistently gives me double yolkers that are larger than a turkey egg, smaller than a goose egg (around 110-118 g).

RIRs start laying a bit later than breeds "designed" to be layers.

How long do hens live? They can live into their teens. When do they stop laying eggs completely? Depends on the breed, but it is not uncommon for an 8-yr. old hen to "pop out" an egg every now and again.
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Old 06-01-2014, 06:16 PM   #167
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How do you to tell if a fresh egg is still good?

The wind blew down our entire back fence last week.Our neighbors chickens have been living in my back yard under a tree where they have built a nest.For quite a while now.I thought they knew she was flying over laying her eggs and climbing the tree to get back home again.

My GR just loves them.He doesn't bother them.Chase them around.Just looks at them like what are you?Wish he would chase that annoying rooster out of the yard!

He found 15 the week before.5 the morning he came over to let us know.
Some shells are brown, some green why is that?

He gave me a dozen.
Do the float test (or you can try to stand the eggs up on end). If they stay on the bottom, horizontal, they are fresh. If they tilt a bit, they are not as fresh. If they rise to the top, vertically, bob in the water, they are old eggs.

Green or blue shells are from breeds that lay that colour of egg (their ears should be that colour--but that might be an old wives' tale that ear colour determines shell colour. It holds true with my hens, but I don't have any Easter Egg hens). These birds are commonly called "Easter Egg" hens, but there are several breeds that lay green, blue, or even lavender eggs.
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Old 06-02-2014, 08:37 AM   #168
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I have boiled eggs that stood up vertical in the water, but didn't float. They were fine, and the shells came off very easily.

The eggs I buy at Aldi's are a good bit cheaper than those elsewhere. Their large eggs are bigger, too. But I did notice that the shells were thinner and wondered why. It makes sense, since they are bigger eggs.

I often see those pkgs of already boiled peeled eggs in the supermarket. Why do people buy them? You have no idea when they were boiled. It would make more sense to me to just buy a dozen eggs and boil them yourself.
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Old 06-02-2014, 02:44 PM   #169
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I often see those pkgs of already boiled peeled eggs in the supermarket. Why do people buy them? You have no idea when they were boiled. It would make more sense to me to just buy a dozen eggs and boil them yourself.
Must be for people who "can't boil water".

Actually they're probably aimed at working people who run into the store to pick up something quick for lunch.
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Old 06-02-2014, 05:21 PM   #170
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Do the float test (or you can try to stand the eggs up on end). If they stay on the bottom, horizontal, they are fresh. If they tilt a bit, they are not as fresh. If they rise to the top, vertically, bob in the water, they are old eggs.

Green or blue shells are from breeds that lay that colour of egg (their ears should be that colour--but that might be an old wives' tale that ear colour determines shell colour. It holds true with my hens, but I don't have any Easter Egg hens). These birds are commonly called "Easter Egg" hens, but there are several breeds that lay green, blue, or even lavender eggs.
There is still a significant number of people over here who firmly believe that brown eggs are "better for you" than white ones and will not be persuaded otherwise. I've noticed over the last few years that supermarket eggs are now nearly all brown apart from the cheap "value" eggs. Obviously they have jumped on the bandwagon. I've read about breeds that lay coloured (ie blue, green, etc.,) eggs but never actually seen them "in the flesh"

Can you actually see hens ears? Or is this a joke?
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