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Old 08-08-2013, 11:08 AM   #31
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In New England we prefer brown eggs. The rest of the country prefers white shell eggs. I find that the brown shells are thicker than the white. And they are more expensive in our area than the white. As the saying around here goes, "Brown eggs are local eggs, and local eggs are good."

If I am going to do a lot of baking, I will buy the white eggs. But it is hard to find a dozen that doesn't have one broken egg. So I do a lot of swapping out from other cartons. I also find that if I break a white egg on the edge of the bowl, it crumbles. I have to gently tap it on the counter top to get a crack in it. The shells of the brown eggs are much stronger.
You are right, growing up in Maine eggs were brown, with white eggs being a specialty item brought in for Easter! Mom would get the white ones if she could before they sold out for us to color, but there were many years that we colored brown eggs

Most eggs here in the south are white. The exception being "upscale" eggs, those with claims of being cage free or free range. I guess people equate the brown eggs with being a more "natural" egg.

You are also correct about the shell, at least in my experience. When I buy the white store eggs, its very easy for me to do a one handed crack and dump without breaking the yolk, but when I get the local farm eggs at the Farmer's market (mostly brown, but assorted colors), I usually have to use two hands because the thicker shells are harder to crack and open up.
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Old 08-08-2013, 11:16 AM   #32
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You are right, growing up in Maine eggs were brown, with white eggs being a specialty item brought in for Easter! Mom would get the white ones if she could before they sold out for us to color, but there were many years that we colored brown eggs

Most eggs here in the south are white. The exception being "upscale" eggs, those with claims of being cage free or free range. I guess people equate the brown eggs with being a more "natural" egg.

You are also correct about the shell, at least in my experience. When I buy the white store eggs, its very easy for me to do a one handed crack and dump without breaking the yolk, but when I get the local farm eggs at the Farmer's market (mostly brown, but assorted colors), I usually have to use two hands because the thicker shells are harder to crack and open up.
Most factory eggs are from Leghorns (white hens). There is no difference re: nutritional value re: brown and white eggs (although I did hear recently that brown eggs have a bit more fiber). Free range hens supposedly lay eggs with lower cholesterol (about 1/3 less) than factory/battery farm hens.

All hens produce the same amount of shell. The younger the bird, the smaller the egg, hence the thicker the shell. Also, the amount of calcium a hen consumes determines the "hardness" of the shell. When I notice my girls' shells are "soft," I make sure they are getting more calcium (recycling egg shells, milk, cheese).

FWIW, I don't raise Leghorns because they are skittish. I like my girls to be friendly.
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Old 08-08-2013, 11:16 AM   #33
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I used to find that eggs with brown shells had more flavour. I figured that the oddball farmers who chose hens that lay brown eggs probably took better care of those hens, maybe let them run around.
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Old 08-08-2013, 11:26 AM   #34
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When candling eggs, one of the things that one looks for is that "drop of blood." No worries, it just means that the hen strained when laying the egg. You can take it out or not, doesn't really matter. However, eggs you buy in the store should not have passed inspection with a spot of blood in the yolk and have been sold as Grade AA.

The eggs I buy at the discount grocery are Grade A. If I am in a regular grocery store I will buy my eggs there instead of making a special trip to the discount store, but I never noticed what grade the eggs were there, A or AA. It was a few months ago when I had that egg with the blood in it and I don't know if it was from the discount grocery or the regular grocery.
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Old 08-08-2013, 11:47 AM   #35
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I went and bought more eggs yesterday and remember when I said the eggs I bought at the discount grocer were so big? Well, they are normal size this time. I guess they sell what they get. I always touch and move every egg in the carton because sometimes they are cracked at the bottom and sticking to the carton.

When I am using eggs, I crack each one into a cup and check it before I add it to the recipe. I make sure there are no shells or anything odd looking about the egg so I don't ruin my recipe by adding it in without checking it.

CWS4322 - Sometimes I see a blob of red (blood?) in an egg. What is that from? I throw those eggs away. When my husband makes scrambled eggs, he uses a spoon and takes out that white membrane that's in it. I keep telling him that when he eats eggs in a restaurant they don't take it out, but he said he doesn't see it so he doesn't know it's in there. LOL
A tip I learned years ago and it works perfectly for me every time.

When you see a piece of egg shell in your cracked egg, use the larger broken shell to get it out. The edge of the broken shell is sharp and will cut right through the egg white. The tiny piece of egg shell will be drawn to the larger egg shell and is easier to scoop out.
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Old 08-08-2013, 11:56 AM   #36
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In New England we prefer brown eggs. The rest of the country prefers white shell eggs. I find that the brown shells are thicker than the white. And they are more expensive in our area than the white. As the saying around here goes, "Brown eggs are local eggs, and local eggs are good."

If I am going to do a lot of baking, I will buy the white eggs. But it is hard to find a dozen that doesn't have one broken egg. So I do a lot of swapping out from other cartons. I also find that if I break a white egg on the edge of the bowl, it crumbles. I have to gently tap it on the counter top to get a crack in it. The shells of the brown eggs are much stronger.
Here in SW PA you rarely see brown eggs. We do pass a farm that advertises brown eggs for sale. People around here seem to think they are deficient in some way. I remember my mother buying them once in a while when I was a kid.

I was googling to read up on eggs, and one thing I saw said that Grade AA eggs should be used for hard boiling, but not Grade A as the shells are thinner. But I have boiled Grade A eggs and they turned out fine. I would think they would peel better because the air space is bigger, so they say.
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Old 08-08-2013, 11:57 AM   #37
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A woman I worked with years back raised chickens and sold eggs. She said she would never eat an egg in a restaurant because she didn't know what the chickens were fed. What are chickens usually fed, and how is one feed more desireable than other?
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Old 08-08-2013, 12:20 PM   #38
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Here in SW PA you rarely see brown eggs. We do pass a farm that advertises brown eggs for sale. People around here seem to think they are deficient in some way. I remember my mother buying them once in a while when I was a kid.

I was googling to read up on eggs, and one thing I saw said that Grade AA eggs should be used for hard boiling, but not Grade A as the shells are thinner. But I have boiled Grade A eggs and they turned out fine. I would think they would peel better because the air space is bigger, so they say.
When I lived in Texas, you should hear the stories I would hear about brown eggs. From chickens that had been exposed to nuclear material to chickens that had been cursed by voodoo. And nothing you could say would change their mind. At least I got a lot of laughs from it all.
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Old 08-08-2013, 02:35 PM   #39
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....I was googling to read up on eggs, and one thing I saw said that Grade AA eggs should be used for hard boiling, but not Grade A as the shells are thinner. But I have boiled Grade A eggs and they turned out fine. I would think they would peel better because the air space is bigger, so they say.
Isn't Google evil fun? Can be a great time-waster, but fun. Anywho, re: eggs. I've never heard that "A" eggs have thinner shells but I'll have to make a point of seeing what grade goes into the water next time I do them. What I do remember reading in the difference between A and AA is that the yolks on the AA "stand up" nicer so you should use those if you want to make prettier sunny-side up ones.

I'm guessing CW will come strolling through here again soon, correcting our misconceptions and "cluck-cluck"ing her tongue at us like she does Myrtle and Company. Not complaining CW - you know we all appreciate your help!
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Old 08-08-2013, 02:40 PM   #40
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When I cook eggs, my whites have to be completely cooked, but I like the yolk runny. I use a lid to do that, so I don't have to turn them over. I always break the yolk if I turn them over. When I was a kid my mother made soft boiled eggs and if the whites were not cooked I would gag on them. I had to stay at the table until I finished them, cold or not. Why do parents do that?
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