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Old 08-08-2013, 02:44 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Isn't Google evil fun? Can be a great time-waster, but fun. Anywho, re: eggs. I've never heard that "A" eggs have thinner shells but I'll have to make a point of seeing what grade goes into the water next time I do them. What I do remember reading in the difference between A and AA is that the yolks on the AA "stand up" nicer so you should use those if you want to make prettier sunny-side up ones.

I'm guessing CW will come strolling through here again soon, correcting our misconceptions and "cluck-cluck"ing her tongue at us like she does Myrtle and Company. Not complaining CW - you know we all appreciate your help!
If the shells are thinner, they should be easier to peel. I have found that if you put plenty of salt in the water, they are less likely to crack. I have even seen slightly cracked eggs in the boiling water, but couldn't find any cracks when I went to peel them.

The yolks on fresher eggs stand up taller. The ratio between height and diameter is one of the ways used to calculate the freshness of eggs.
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Old 08-08-2013, 02:48 PM   #42
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I don't know why parents do that Carol. You would think it would discourage a kid from eating. Obviously, if you look at me, you know my parents never used that trick.

My Great Aunt and her husband owned a lunch counter in Cleveland in the 1930's and '40s. They would steam their sunny-side up eggs that way, adding a splash of icy cold water just before putting the lid on to generate more steam. That's the only way I ever knew. Then when Himself and I got married he said his Mom made "basted" eggs and proceeded to explain a Heart-Attack-on-a-Plate! Fry your bacon, take it out of the grease, crack your egg(s) into the fat, and spoon the drippings over the top until the whites are done. Yeah...he doesn't EVER get them that way anymore!
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Old 08-08-2013, 03:16 PM   #43
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A woman I worked with years back raised chickens and sold eggs. She said she would never eat an egg in a restaurant because she didn't know what the chickens were fed. What are chickens usually fed, and how is one feed more desireable than other?
I generally don't eat eggs in restaurants--they are downright gross. Chickens typically are fed what is called layer mash. It is a combination of corn and other grains. My chickens also eat bananas, beans, bread, peaches, tomatoes, greens, bugs, snakes, worms, cheese, sour milk, buttermilk, oatmeal--just about anything they can find or I offer them. They love it when I clean out the fridge--there is usually some cheese or yogurt or other goodie in there that is "chicken feed." Battery-farm hens only get commercial feed. We picked up a flock of 10 birds from a commercial farm last summer. It took about 3 weeks for their eggs to "taste right." The yolks were pale and tasteless.
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Old 08-08-2013, 03:27 PM   #44
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I don't know why parents do that Carol. You would think it would discourage a kid from eating. Obviously, if you look at me, you know my parents never used that trick.

My Great Aunt and her husband owned a lunch counter in Cleveland in the 1930's and '40s. They would steam their sunny-side up eggs that way, adding a splash of icy cold water just before putting the lid on to generate more steam. That's the only way I ever knew. Then when Himself and I got married he said his Mom made "basted" eggs and proceeded to explain a Heart-Attack-on-a-Plate! Fry your bacon, take it out of the grease, crack your egg(s) into the fat, and spoon the drippings over the top until the whites are done. Yeah...he doesn't EVER get them that way anymore!

My mother did that too! She kept a little cup on the counter by the stove for bacon grease and cooked most everything in it. Could that be the cause of my heart disease? I'll admit, they are really good that way.
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Old 08-08-2013, 03:34 PM   #45
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I generally don't eat eggs in restaurants--they are downright gross. Chickens typically are fed what is called layer mash. It is a combination of corn and other grains. My chickens also eat bananas, beans, bread, peaches, tomatoes, greens, bugs, snakes, worms, cheese, sour milk, buttermilk, oatmeal--just about anything they can find or I offer them. They love it when I clean out the fridge--there is usually some cheese or yogurt or other goodie in there that is "chicken feed." Battery-farm hens only get commercial feed. We picked up a flock of 10 birds from a commercial farm last summer. It took about 3 weeks for their eggs to "taste right." The yolks were pale and tasteless.

I have noticed that some egg yolks are bright orange and some are very pale. I only get store bought eggs, no farm eggs.

This will be my last egg question, I promise! What is the correct way to hard boil an egg and get the shell to come off easily? There are so many ideas out there. I put the eggs in cold water to cover. When the water starts to boil I set my timer for 10 minutes. When done, I pour off the boiling water and fill the pot with cold water and let set for about 15 minutes. Sometimes they peel easily and sometimes not. I have heard that older eggs will peel easier than fresh eggs.
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Old 08-08-2013, 04:39 PM   #46
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My mother did that too! She kept a little cup on the counter by the stove for bacon grease and cooked most everything in it. Could that be the cause of my heart disease? I'll admit, they are really good that way.
Not likely. High cholesterol and heart disease are due more to genetics. Pork fat actually has less saturated fat than butter.
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Old 08-08-2013, 04:54 PM   #47
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Here in SW PA you rarely see brown eggs. We do pass a farm that advertises brown eggs for sale. People around here seem to think they are deficient in some way. I remember my mother buying them once in a while when I was a kid.

I was googling to read up on eggs, and one thing I saw said that Grade AA eggs should be used for hard boiling, but not Grade A as the shells are thinner. But I have boiled Grade A eggs and they turned out fine. I would think they would peel better because the air space is bigger, so they say.
There is no difference in the nutritional value of the eggs. They are just from the different type of hens. The nutritional value depends on the chickens health, age, nutrition, etc. the older the egg the easier it is to peel. A fresh egg will be much harder to peel when hard boiled. AA eggs and A eggs don't have a difference for hard boiling. The difference between AA, A and B is the tightness of the egg white and height of the egg yolk. AA is good for over easy, poached, sunny side. Anything where the presentation of the eggs form is necessary. A and B can be used for hard boil, scrambled, omelets, etc.
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Old 08-08-2013, 05:07 PM   #48
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I have noticed that some egg yolks are bright orange and some are very pale. I only get store bought eggs, no farm eggs.

This will be my last egg question, I promise! What is the correct way to hard boil an egg and get the shell to come off easily? There are so many ideas out there. I put the eggs in cold water to cover. When the water starts to boil I set my timer for 10 minutes. When done, I pour off the boiling water and fill the pot with cold water and let set for about 15 minutes. Sometimes they peel easily and sometimes not. I have heard that older eggs will peel easier than fresh eggs.
Older eggs will peel easier than fresh eggs. The reason is that the shell is porous and some of the white has evaporated (that's why you get an air pocket in hb eggs). To determine if your eggs are "older," put them in a bowl of water. Fresh eggs sink and are horizontal. Older eggs will bob/stand upright in the water. I have had no success boiling fresh eggs (the shell does not come off clean). However, I have had great success baking fresh eggs. I use a mini-muffin tin and lay the eggs horizontally across the tin. I generally do 3-4 dozen at a time (I make pickled eggs).

Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard-Cooked Eggs - Alaska from ScratchAlaska from Scratch

FWIW, adding salt or vinegar to the water does nothing because you would need to boil the eggs for about an hour to change the ph level of the water sufficiently to make a difference.
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Old 08-08-2013, 07:39 PM   #49
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Older eggs will peel easier than fresh eggs. The reason is that the shell is porous and some of the white has evaporated (that's why you get an air pocket in hb eggs). To determine if your eggs are "older," put them in a bowl of water. Fresh eggs sink and are horizontal. Older eggs will bob/stand upright in the water. I have had no success boiling fresh eggs (the shell does not come off clean). However, I have had great success baking fresh eggs. I use a mini-muffin tin and lay the eggs horizontally across the tin. I generally do 3-4 dozen at a time (I make pickled eggs).

Kitchen Tip: Baked Hard-Cooked Eggs - Alaska from ScratchAlaska from Scratch

FWIW, adding salt or vinegar to the water does nothing because you would need to boil the eggs for about an hour to change the ph level of the water sufficiently to make a difference.

I never heard of baking the eggs. I will have to try that. Thanks!
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Old 08-08-2013, 08:06 PM   #50
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I never heard of baking the eggs. I will have to try that. Thanks!
My theory as to why I can peel fresh "baked" hb eggs is that as the eggs bake, the heat of the oven causes some evaporation. When I peel "baked" hb eggs, there is an air pocket. When submerged in water to cook, there is no evaporation and I end up with a lot of the white sticking to the shell.
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