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Old 08-08-2013, 09:22 PM   #51
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My theory as to why I can peel fresh "baked" hb eggs is that as the eggs bake, the heat of the oven causes some evaporation. When I peel "baked" hb eggs, there is an air pocket. When submerged in water to cook, there is no evaporation and I end up with a lot of the white sticking to the shell.
Are you baking it in a water bath? If not its not a hard boiled egg.
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:23 PM   #52
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It's just hard cooked (or hard baked) eggs
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:25 PM   #53
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Well if we're going to be that picky, I guess that it's technically a hard "cooked" egg, sheesh....
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:35 PM   #54
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Well sorry, proper terminology and technique is important in cooking. Otherwise any creamy rice is a risotto or anything thrown in a pan is pan fried.
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Old 08-08-2013, 09:47 PM   #55
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Well sorry, proper terminology and technique is important in cooking. Otherwise any creamy rice is a risotto or anything thrown in a pan is pan fried.
Well what we are talking about results in the same product regardless of cooking technique, what you are describing doesn't.

Describing it as a hard boiled egg helps others picture what the finished product actually is. Calling it a baked egg describes a completely different dish all together.
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Old 08-09-2013, 07:35 AM   #56
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Not to split fine hairs (usage determines definition), but according the the American Egg Board, the terms hard boiled and soft boiled are misnomers. If the eggs were boiled, they would be tough and rubbery. The AEB prefers the terms hard cooked or soft cooked, so baking the eggs instead of cooking them in water achieves the same end result, a hard cooked egg. And, according to the AEB, adding salt to the water raises the boiling point when starting the eggs and this contributes to a rubbery white as well. Supposedly eggs should be 3-5 days old. I find mine have to be between 2-3 weeks old to peel nicely if cooked on the stove. I love baking the eggs, so have stopped hard cooking them on the stove.

The freshness difference probably accounts for the time it takes for commercial eggs to get from the farm to the store (if the eggs are being shipped to one of the three locations that pasteurize eggs in the US before they reach the store. Eggs marked with a pink "P" in a circle are pasteurized).

Now, if you want to make a poached egg, the fresher the better because the white clings to the yolk and you don't end up with a mess of egg white in the pan.
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Old 08-09-2013, 08:15 AM   #57
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My experience with hard boiling/cooking eggs is that they peel much more easily if I wash them and then store them in the fridge, in a cardboard carton, for at least 2 weeks. I will have to try baking them--sounds like a great idea. Store eggs peel easier because they are washed as part of the process, and because they are likely to be several days or weeks old when you buy them.

C-dub, one small correction about blood spots. The blood comes from the beginning of the reproductive tract, and is the result of a small injury deep inside the hen. If the chicken had trouble laying the egg, the blood would be on the shell.

A note about grading: USDA graded eggs will have a shield on the box, with the letter grade inside. Companies can grade their own eggs, to their own standards, and can call them 'grade A' or 'grade AAA' but they can't use the shield. Grading is mostly cosmetic, both in eggs and in poultry products. The eggs or chicken parts look right. Inspection for disease or sanitation is different.
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Old 08-09-2013, 08:19 AM   #58
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C-dub, one small correction about blood spots. The blood comes from the beginning of the reproductive tract, and is the result of a small injury deep inside the hen. If the chicken had trouble laying the egg, the blood would be on the shell.
Often the eggs that have a blood spot also have some spots on the shell. I did have one egg that was all blood once. This is the reason I always crack the egg in a small cup and not directly in the pan. I generally only store washed eggs in the fridge. Speaking of which, my soft cooked eggs should be done! Baking the fresh ones in the oven works really well. In the winter, I put snow in the sink with water to get the water really, really cold.
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Old 08-09-2013, 09:07 AM   #59
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I have no way of knowing how old my eggs are when I buy them, but I always check the sell-by date on the carton. Other than that, I would never have eggs 2 to 3 weeks old. I usually buy eggs once a week. For day to day hard cooked eggs I will probably continue to boil since it's usually only 1 or 2 eggs, but for Easter and if I'm making deviled eggs, I will definately be trying the baking procedure. That's when I usually have the most trouble with the shells not coming off nicely. For egg salad or potato salad, I don't care as much.

I know I said I was finished asking questions, but I guess I lied! LOL Why is it when you make pickled eggs they become rubbery?
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Old 08-09-2013, 09:40 AM   #60
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I have no way of knowing how old my eggs are when I buy them, but I always check the sell-by date on the carton. Other than that, I would never have eggs 2 to 3 weeks old. I usually buy eggs once a week. For day to day hard cooked eggs I will probably continue to boil since it's usually only 1 or 2 eggs, but for Easter and if I'm making deviled eggs, I will definately be trying the baking procedure. That's when I usually have the most trouble with the shells not coming off nicely. For egg salad or potato salad, I don't care as much.

I know I said I was finished asking questions, but I guess I lied! LOL Why is it when you make pickled eggs they become rubbery?
It depends on the recipe. Some call for equal parts water to vinegar, others call for more vinegar than water. Some recipes include sugar, others don't. I'm guessing it is the vinegar that causes that to happen and the ratio of water:vinegar.

And, you don't want to know how long eggs can sit in a warehouse before they make it to the store. To check the freshness of your eggs, submerge them in water (I use one of those plastic tubs when I wash eggs). The freshest ones will stay on the bottom, horizontal. It is not unusual to get some really fresh eggs and some older eggs in the same carton.
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