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Old 08-10-2013, 01:37 PM   #71
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Well, I believe that God put the chickens here to lay the eggs for us to eat. Some lab made the eggbeaters. I'm going with God's eggs!
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Old 08-10-2013, 01:39 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
It's the sodium content and extra ingredients of eggbeaters that I am not happy with.
You're right. I thought my parents used Eggbeaters, but looking at the packaging on the Web, that is not the one they buy. I can't remember what it is, but it is an egg replacement product. The nutritional information on the package indicates it has a whole lot of stuff added (stabilizers, etc.), more calories than an egg, and more cholesterol and sodium. Here in Canada, the eggs that have sat in the warehouse for up to ONE year are the ones that are used in those types of products. Eggbeaters is not the product my parents buy and not the package I looked at when I was there in May. My bad. What they buy doesn't come in a "milk carton." Whatever it is, I won't eat it. It has too much junk in it that "real" eggs do not have. Besides, the most nutrition in an egg is in the yolk. So if you're going to eat a part of the egg, eat the yolk.

I have a bias re: "eggs are evil." I taught a course on canine and feline nutrition at a local college. Eggs are the scale against which protein content in pet food is evaluated, with eggs being the perfect source of protein. I probably could dig up the course notes and provide the formula to figure out "real" protein that is in pet food. I'm pretty sure those files are on this computer still!
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Old 08-10-2013, 01:53 PM   #73
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I once did a home visit for a rescued Saint Bernard where the couple owned a battery farm. I had no intention of placing a dog with them (they didn't have fencing, etc.), but I wanted to get inside the battery farm. What I saw made me sick. When they bragged about how many eggs they had in their warehouse and how long the eggs would be there before going to market, I knew that I had to have my own hens someday. It took awhile, but I can still see all those birds in those tiny boxes and the SMELL. I did not like seeing the conditions in which the hens were kept or knowing how long eggs sit in a warehouse before they reach market.

I have a cookbook for those who sail. I can't find it, but I recall that eggs were kept in salt and could last up to one year. Not sure if the eggs were farm fresh or commercial, I'd have to find the cookbook. Suffice it to say, I prefer the eggs my girls lay. I know what they eat (they happen to love bananas, btw), I know the conditions in which they are kept, and they get out in the sun every day. Miss Broodie is still locked up with the chicks. Her comb has gotten very pale. I don't dare let the chicks and Miss Broodie out yet because of the threat of chicken hawks. I don't want to lose one of the chicks (or all of them). The combs also get very pale in the winter if the girls don't go out (they don't like snow).
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Old 08-10-2013, 02:35 PM   #74
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eggs are bad
eggs are good

salt is bad
salt is good

meat is bad
meat is good

etc.

today's problem is every yahoo with a computer Twits - no that's not Tweets - they're Twits... "authoritative" information about {something} / {virtually anything} and suddenly the whole world thinks to believe it.

Canada has it's own "food authorities" - but regrets I don't follow "them"

the last regulatory go-round in USA involved keeping shell eggs under 'constant' refrigeration. as in, eggs delivered to supermarkets / store must travel in refrigerated trucks..... per industry "doom & gloom" statements, I'm sure everyone has noticed the cost of eggs is now 3x previous . . . .

no, not to kept them fresh. the point is/was to retard salmonella.
sheesh; UK and many other countries require laying hens to be vaccinated. $0.36 per chick as I recall.
but not in USA. way easier to burn fossil fuel to refrigerate a semi-trailer.....

the new rules require eggs be refrigerated within 36 hours of being laid by the chicken.
see the problem? not every hen lays her eggs on a convenient schedule.....

so (many lawsuits later) if you collect eggs daily at 5 PM, the 36 hour rule starts from 5 PM - anybody notice the egg could have been laid 23 hours, 59 minutes and 59 seconds comma yesterday?

which is not a problem except that.... per so many weird and wonderful sites, including FSIS, USDA, etc. - an egg stored at room temp for 24 hours "ages" as if refrigerated for a "week"

so,,,, ah nuts. 36 hours really isn't 36 hours - its (36+24) hours = 60 hours (minus a second)
with the result that technically / legally the egg may already have the aged the equivalent of 2.5 weeks / 17-18 days before any refrigeration or "storage" limits are encountered.

quick, somebody tell me why it should take a day-and-a-half-plus to get an egg from the hen to the cooler?

I read on some site that added up all the legal maximums - eggs you're eating in April could have been laid in November. don't want to think about that.

now, I agree entirely that many/most companies strive to produce/handle/sell the highest quality.
but there are companies who flaunt/push the "rules" to the limit.

personally I'd rather have a hen house - but that's not permitted in my neighborhood.
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Old 08-10-2013, 02:54 PM   #75
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personally I'd rather have a hen house - but that's not permitted in my neighborhood.
That is something that really gets my goat (speaking of which, goats are being used at the Congressional Cemetery--not sure if that is the name--in the DC area to clear poison ivy, etc.). Big Brother has gotten a bit too invasive. I love having laying hens. My grandparents raised prize-winning Rhode Island Reds. The eggs produced help feed the family during the depression. With so many children going hungry in the world, it just seems WRONG that families cannot have hens. I don't know of any municipalities that have outlawed gardens (although I do know of some that have banned clothes lines, another thing that was common where I grew up--and I hang all my clothes...which reminds me, bio-waste is supposed to be spread next week--no hanging laundry! At least I got a notice).
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Old 08-12-2013, 04:25 AM   #76
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I might have missed this answer but what are the little white specks inside the egg white? In a commercial kitchen we always used frozen pasteurized eggs in a gallon milk carton. We prepared a lot of food for children and elderly and felt that it was the safest most consistent way to use eggs.We didn't have to worry about anyone under cooking them. They had little or no taste and were full of junk and stabilizers. In fine dining we used farm fresh eggs They had Incredible taste. color and flavor, and we knew where they came from.
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Old 08-12-2013, 06:02 AM   #77
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The little white strands on either end of the yolk are called chalazae. They serve to anchor the yolk to the white. The more pronounced, the fresher the egg. If the white is cloudy, that indicates the presence of naturally occurring carbon dioxide that has not had time to escape through the shell. As the egg ages, the carbon dioxide evaporates and the white becomes more transparent.

The DH hardly ever ate eggs until we got chickens. His breakfast now includes eggs. When he travels for business, he won't order eggs--they aren't "real" eggs. When I go visit my parents, I bring enough "real" eggs to last the entire time I'm there.
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:17 AM   #78
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My town just passed an ordinance in June allowing chickens, with some restrictions, like a minimum lot size and maximum number of chickens. I signed a petition to allow it, although my lot is too small for us to have them. I figure they can't be any more bothersome than dogs.

It's my understanding that many municipalities banned chickens because, as people moved to the suburbs, they wanted a new lifestyle and didn't want to live as if they were on a farm.
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Old 08-12-2013, 08:24 AM   #79
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My town just passed an ordinance in June allowing chickens, with some restrictions, like a minimum lot size and maximum number of chickens. I signed a petition to allow it, although my lot is too small for us to have them. I figure they can't be any more bothersome than dogs.

It's my understanding that many municipalities banned chickens because, as people moved to the suburbs, they wanted a new lifestyle and didn't want to live as if they were on a farm.
I thought municipalities banned them because of the fear of Avian flu and the noise roosters make. I live in a rural area--city folks move out here and they don't like it that the farmers spread manure on their fields. If you didn't want to live in the country, you should've stayed in the City is my opinion. I love the laid-back lifestyle of rural living. It is so quiet at night when you sit on your deck, look up at the BLACK sky (no light pollution), and hear the crickets and frogs. And, watch the lightening bugs.
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Old 08-12-2013, 09:16 AM   #80
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In most areas, backyard chickens were banned long before avian flu became a concern.

From Changing Your City's Chicken Laws:

"Introduction
In the post-WWII decades, many urban and suburban communities around the country instituted laws intended to distance us from our then-unfashionable rural roots. It was a time when neighborhoods were built without sidewalks,“ChemLawn” seemed like a great name for a business, and keeping chickens in the backyard served as an uncomfortable reminder of the fact Grandma used to slaughter a hen on the back porch every Sunday morning. Suburbanites seeded their lots with grass, installed lawn sprinklers, sprayed and sprayed and sprayed,and passed laws prohibiting chickens in urban and suburban backyards.
...
Chickens and the History of Suburban Development
Why Were Chickens Prohibited by Earlier Lawmakers?

The birth of the modern suburb was a time when many of us were seeking to define ourselves as sophisticated and more like those in the cosmopolitan city than like those in unfashionable rural small towns and farming communities. The car was a symbol of that cosmopolitan lifestyle, so we eliminated sidewalks – why, after all, would anyone walk who could afford to drive? The sidewalk became a symbol of poverty and backwardness. Later generations regretted that decision and many have retrofitted sidewalks and streetlights in their neighborhoods.

The keeping of chickens and other food‐producing animals was also unfashionable during the decades immediately following World War II, and for similar reasons. The problem wasn’t one of chickens creating a nuisance; it was one of wanting to seem modern, cosmopolitan, and sophisticated. (Appendix G)"
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