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Old 03-24-2014, 07:46 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
I do remember making them back in the last house, so it would be pre-2000. I was getting all kinds of those sample "buy our recipe card sets" offers in the mail (I have enough sample cards for an entire box! ) and Hasselbacks were one of the recipes...
That's where I first came across them, too! And I still have them and use them. Just checked - ironically, they're from a company called Great American Recipes
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Old 03-24-2014, 10:47 AM   #22
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ATK placed their potatoes in water to sit a while. They also cut off small pieces from each end. These steps helped to remove some of the starch. It is the starch that keeps your potatoes from fanning out. It acts as a glue. That starch is what turns your mashed potatoes to glue when you whip them too much.

I don't remember how long ATK soaked their potatoes. But when they removed them, you could see all the starch at the bottom of the water. They also dried the potatoes thoroughly before cutting into them.

Andy, do you remember if ATK soaked them before slicing them or after? I would think you get rid of more starch if you soak them after slicing.
Earlier in my post I mentioned I soaked mine in cold salted water like one would soak a bloomin onion. But I did not have enough time to allow them to soak for long.

I soaked mine after I sliced it. To help open it up.
The second time, I made sure some of the melted butter and oil made its way down between the slices and I also made sure the coarse salt and pepper made there way down in between.
They came out much nicer the second time around.

Next time I will insert something between each slice. I don't want to turn this into a labor intensive project either.
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Old 03-28-2014, 07:33 PM   #23
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Thanks for the cutting technique guys.

Works like a champ.

I now have two 1/4" dowels 10" long dedicated for this. (I don't own any chopsticks.)

So simple yet so far from my thoughts.

All those times trying knife skills that aren't there and the solution was so simple.

I like the wooden spoon method because it looks like it would be better at keeping you from cutting completely through the tater because the distance between the sticks varies from end to end. I don't have a spoon large enough for the size tatters I usually want to cook.

Guess I need to experiment and make a device to hack up a potato to my specifications.

Thanks again for the cutting technique and now I need to figure out the differences in cooking time between a Hasselback and regular tater.

Such is life.
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Old 03-29-2014, 12:53 PM   #24
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Thanks for the cutting technique guys.

Works like a champ.

I now have two 1/4" dowels 10" long dedicated for this. (I don't own any chopsticks.)

So simple yet so far from my thoughts.

All those times trying knife skills that aren't there and the solution was so simple.

I like the wooden spoon method because it looks like it would be better at keeping you from cutting completely through the tater because the distance between the sticks varies from end to end. I don't have a spoon large enough for the size tatters I usually want to cook.

Guess I need to experiment and make a device to hack up a potato to my specifications.

Thanks again for the cutting technique and now I need to figure out the differences in cooking time between a Hasselback and regular tater.

Such is life.
I have not used the technique yet either. But I will next chance I get.
I have an assortment of dowels in my shop.
Seems the Hasselback takes less time to cook.

I just give a little squeeze to check for doneness on both types of potato.
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:36 PM   #25
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Yes, Less time but not by much.

RB. I wouldn't worry about separating the slices. Mine seem to do a good job of opening up themselves as the moisture is cooked off.
If you're concerned perhaps you could place a small dowel perpendicular at the center to raise the tater. As the ends fall the tater will open.

I've just drizzled mine with a bit of butter/oil, garlic or spice of your choice and had good luck.
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:50 PM   #26
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Yes, Less time but not by much.

RB. I wouldn't worry about separating the slices. Mine seem to do a good job of opening up themselves as the moisture is cooked off.
If you're concerned perhaps you could place a small dowel perpendicular at the center to raise the tater. As the ends fall the tater will open.

I've just drizzled mine with a bit of butter/oil, garlic or spice of your choice and had good luck.
I have made them twice. I am making them again today to go with my roast beef.
They opened up better the last time as I did put a rolled up piece of foil in the center under each. I had the same vision as you. It did help, but it also allowed two to break in half.

I need to invent a special knife for this. Each side of the knife blade has opposite cutting lines, so each slice will actually repel the next slice. Like verticle on one side and horizontal on the other side.

Can anyone say. "Ronco" Hasselback Potato Slicer!
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Old 03-30-2014, 12:56 PM   #27
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I have made them twice. I am making them again today to go with my roast beef.
They opened up better the last time as I did put a rolled up piece of foil in the center under each. I had the same vision as you. It did help, but it also allowed two to break in half.

I need to invent a special knife for this. Each side of the knife blade has opposite cutting lines, so each slice will actually repel the next slice. Like verticle on one side and horizontal on the other side.

Can anyone say. "Ronco" Hasselback Potato Slicer!
Pampered Chef makes the Hold'n Slice

http://www.pamperedchef.com/images/p...01_product.jpg

I've used it to slice meat, it would work for potatoes.
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Old 03-30-2014, 02:01 PM   #28
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Pampered Chef makes the Hold'n Slice

http://www.pamperedchef.com/images/p...01_product.jpg

I've used it to slice meat, it would work for potatoes.
Looks unusual. Like a hair pic? How is that device used?

My special knife will not just slice, it will cut grooves into the potato on different angles for each side. To help keep them separated.

Think of those scissors that cut a triangle edge. Then the other side a different shape.
Each slice would repel the other causing the Facebook potato to flower on its own with texture.
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Old 03-30-2014, 02:11 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post

Looks unusual. Like a hair pic? How is that device used?

My special knife will not just slice, it will cut grooves into the potato on different angles for each side. To help keep them separated.

Think of those scissors that cut a triangle edge. Then the other side a different shape.
Each slice would repel the other causing the Facebook potato to flower on its own with texture.
You poke it into stuff, like potatoes, tomatoes, onions and cheese, then using a knife, slice in between the tines.

I suppose you could use it as a hair pic too.
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Old 03-31-2014, 12:58 PM   #30
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You poke it into stuff, like potatoes, tomatoes, onions and cheese, then using a knife, slice in between the tines.

I suppose you could use it as a hair pic too.
Got it. I was not sure how it was used.

Well I made Facebook potato's yesterday and they came out the best so far.
I used two long wooden spoon handles (in place of chop sticks) for my slicing guide.
It looks like the depth of the cut is very important.

My potato flowered well and was crispy. I mixed up a sour cream dip for the slices. I am getting better at this.

It seems if you get some oil/butter and coarse salt in between the slices, they separate much better.
The slicing guides allow the cut to go almost to the bottom. This little extra depth makes the difference in the final product.
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