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Old 08-25-2006, 03:52 AM   #71
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Because of my move I missed the early jam season in UK, and what would I have done with it all? The preserving jars are easily, and less expensively bought in supermarkets here in Italy, but I am still in my corporate let.....its a brand new kitchen and I don't think I am cheeky enough to set up a jam production station it in. Next year.....wow!
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Old 08-25-2006, 08:07 AM   #72
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raspberry, blackberry, huckleberry, rhubarb, dark cherry, plum, apple butter, lemon marmalade, apricot. homemade whole cranberry sauce cooked up thick make a scrumptious spread, too.

and by the way, just in case MARMALADY is out there, how'd your jam come out? Blackberry jam
any chance of your sending a jar to japan???
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let me make sure that wine's ok before i use it.
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Old 09-13-2006, 06:29 AM   #73
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Strawberry would be my favorite jelly. And Banana would be my favorite jam.

I also love Grape, Cherry, Mixed Fruit, and Raspberry.
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Old 09-13-2006, 06:53 AM   #74
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Well, I have realised what I can make once I am settled, late autumn /early winter, will be proper marmalade! I woulld like to say English marmalade, but I'm scared Ishbel might read this and rightfully correct me and remind me that marmalade is Scottish!

I'll probably also make a couple of jars of appple jelly to get us through the winter, and make the occasional citrus curd. Although, spiced pumpkin butter sounds unpassupable so I might try that.

What we are having at the moment is mainly marron spread. Its so much cheaper and more widely available than in Uk and one of my absolute favourites. But, better than on toast or bread I love it on crepes. Mmmmmm heaven.
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Old 09-13-2006, 07:39 AM   #75
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I like to use only Seville oranges for ORANGE marmalade, Lulu - but you could make grapefruit any time, or or blood orange (spectacular colour)is good too - the less squeamish name of Sanquinello doesn't really do justice to those oranges!

Yes, marmalade is (arguably!) Scottish and it's Dundee's finest product.....
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Old 09-13-2006, 07:54 AM   #76
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LOL, did you feel your ears burning! :)
Yes, I heard a really good programme on Radio 4 about the origins of marmalade and it prompted me to do some reading and researching. I think any argument in origin is pretty well won by Scotland. I am a seville orange girl too (with a strong dash of Scotch!), but I'll see whats about when I am ready. Rose's lime occasionally creeps in for nostaglia value, and I buy lots of other interesting combos, I enjoy pink grapefruit. Maybe its time to experiment in my own kitchen a little more with marmalade. ;)
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Old 09-13-2006, 08:36 AM   #77
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I like a lemon/lime marmalade, too.
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Old 09-14-2006, 05:39 AM   #78
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Ishbel? Lulu? Can you walk me through making citrus marmalades?

I'm planning on trying bitter orange marmalade this winter since we have tons of the trees about. But I also like a grapefruit. Lemon? Probably nice too. Lime? Can't get them here, or rather, they're way too expensive.
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Old 09-14-2006, 06:00 AM   #79
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Here's my recipe posted a while back
Traditional British marmalade made with Seville oranges

And I KNOW there are a lot more recipes, but they may be mixed up in threads with other topic names, I'll try and find a couple more!

Here's a lemon/lime marmalade recipe which was posted by Daisy quite a while ago


Lemon or Lime Marmalade

1.5kg lemons or limes unblemished with smooth skins

3 litres water

3kg sugar



Using a potato peeler or sharp, narrow knife, peel off the rind in thin downward strips, being careful to leave all the white-pith behind. Chop or scissor the thin peel into 3mm wide strips. Cut the lemons or limes in half and squeeze out all the ]uice, saving the pips. Cut away the pith with a sharp knife, leaving the pulp. Chop the pith roughly and tie it in a large piece of muslin, together with the pips. Cut the pulp into small chunks and put them in the preserving pan, with the chopped peel and the muslin bag. Strain the lemon or lime juice into the pan and add the water. Bring the fruit mixture to the boil over low heat and simmer, uncovered for about 2 hours or until the peel is quite soft and the contents of the pan have reduced by about half. Remove the muslin bag, and add the sugar, stirring continuously until it has dissolved. Turn up the heat and boil the marmalade rapidly until setting point is reached, after 15-20 minutes. Skim the marmalade at once, then leave to cool and settle tor about 30 minutes.
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Old 09-14-2006, 07:01 AM   #80
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Ishbel, brilliant -- thanks very much!

I've copied both into a Word doc and I'll look at them a bit closer later on. Just a quick question: this type of preserving doesn't require you to do hot water baths and that sort of thing?

Also ... Seville oranges per se we don't have, meaning, they're not sold in supermarkets labeled as such. However, we have what we call "bitter oranges" everywhere in Athens, in front of every house on every street just about. These are the ones Greeks would use to make orange preserves which is akin to marmalade. They'd be suitable for marmalade wouldn't you think?

I'll Google for exact meaning of Seville oranges so don't feel you need to on my behalf.

Thanks again.
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