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Old 01-03-2012, 04:09 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
dawg, i hope you meant to smuggle the lemon juice in your luggage.

to mule something means to carry something in a body cavity, swallowed or inserted.


Actually, we do call it "muling" as in using a mule/donkey to carry your stuff, no cavities involved. Smuggling would prompt a "search".

2 16 oz. bottles of Realemon would be, um, uncomfortable. Especially on a long flight!
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Old 01-03-2012, 05:33 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
I agree totally that lemon juice is outstanding and IMO underappreciated!
Or lime juice. Lime juice is one of my "secret" ingredients. Sometimes a squeeze of lime over the top of a dish can really make the dish come alive!

When I first encountered fish sauce (nam pla) it sounded sort of weird to me but I knew I wasn't going to be doing any serious Thai cooking without it, so I began using it. Later on I eventually built up to actually tasting it, and I discovered that it was much milder than I had ever imagined, the smell wasn't as strong as I had previously imagined, and I realized that it was quite salty. It sometimes seems to me that fish sauce to some degree is Thai salt, or serves the function in many recipes. (And adds to the flavor complexity too of course.)

These days I don't even measure the stuff (or at least not unless I'm trying to create a written recipe so I can post it on the Internet). I usually just pour it into my pan ingredients, stir things a bit and taste, then add some more if I think it needs it.

Also noting, there are wide variations between brands and there are different kinds of fish sauce, and fish sauce varies depending on origin (e.g. Thai fish sauce, Vietnamese fish sauce, etc.). Somebody who thinks their fish sauce is too strong should find a different brand. I recommend the kind that looks like dark tea with little or no sediments. (My favorite is Cock brand from Thailand, a mild fish sauce IMO.)

Get mam nem sauce if you want something with a real kick to it!
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Old 01-13-2012, 02:57 PM   #33
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Since no one has mentioned a brand yet and if you're like that one starring at all the choices I highly recommend the one with 3 crabs. It's at most places that sells fish sauce and I think I've seen it at albertsons or Ralphs in Asian isle. If you can't find that, the Squid brand is almost as good.
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Old 01-13-2012, 06:13 PM   #34
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Called, strangely enough, Three Crabs Brand.

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Old 01-14-2012, 10:11 AM   #35
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Nice job, that's the Hennessy of fish sauce.
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Old 01-14-2012, 11:37 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by apple916 View Post
Nice job, that's the Hennessy of fish sauce.
Since I bought some red boat Red Boat Fish Sauce First Press Extra Virgin my wife will only allow in the house. I have to mail order it and it is expensive but is worth it.
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Old 01-14-2012, 05:31 PM   #37
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Fish sauce isthe new olive oil.

All of a sudden there are more and more interesting brands on the market.
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Old 01-14-2012, 06:38 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by Gourmet Greg View Post
Or lime juice. Lime juice is one of my "secret" ingredients. Sometimes a squeeze of lime over the top of a dish can really make the dish come alive!

When I first encountered fish sauce (nam pla) it sounded sort of weird to me but I knew I wasn't going to be doing any serious Thai cooking without it, so I began using it. Later on I eventually built up to actually tasting it, and I discovered that it was much milder than I had ever imagined, the smell wasn't as strong as I had previously imagined, and I realized that it was quite salty. It sometimes seems to me that fish sauce to some degree is Thai salt, or serves the function in many recipes. (And adds to the flavor complexity too of course.)

These days I don't even measure the stuff (or at least not unless I'm trying to create a written recipe so I can post it on the Internet). I usually just pour it into my pan ingredients, stir things a bit and taste, then add some more if I think it needs it.

Also noting, there are wide variations between brands and there are different kinds of fish sauce, and fish sauce varies depending on origin (e.g. Thai fish sauce, Vietnamese fish sauce, etc.). Somebody who thinks their fish sauce is too strong should find a different brand. I recommend the kind that looks like dark tea with little or no sediments. (My favorite is Cock brand from Thailand, a mild fish sauce IMO.)

Get mam nem sauce if you want something with a real kick to it!
I think that a lot of the citrus flavors used in Cambodian, Thai, Vietnamese, and other Siamese countries comes from Kaffir Lime and Lemongrass rather than from the fruit itself. Neither is easy to come by in my area as spices, but both do well as deck and house plants. Kaffir lime grows around 6 ft high as a pot plant, and has long, very sharp, spikes.
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Old 01-14-2012, 06:59 PM   #39
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All I can say is that I've frequently seen Thai recipes that include lime juice as an ingredient, or finished off with lime juice. (Both in my Thai cookbooks and on TV cooking shows.)

I don't see how anybody can make a real Thai curry without Kaffir lime leaves. I'm fortunate in L.A. that I can find Kaffir lime leaves in my favorite Asian market (but not every time). Kaffir lime leaves don't taste much like ordinary limes to me. I find the taste indescribable, and so obviously I won't try to describe.

I've often thought it would be a good idea to get a Kaffir lime bush, to have a dependable source of the leaves. As I said, IMO you can't make a good Thai curry without, or at least I can't.

Lemongrass doesn't taste like ordinary limes to me either, not even slightly. Again, indescribable, so I won't even try.



BTW I use Cock brand fish sauce (picture of rooster next to brand name). I have so many brands to choose from (at least a couple dozen, probably more) that I happened to pick Cock brand because I was already using their brand jasmine rice. It worked fine for me so I just stuck with it (both the fish sauce and the jasmine rice). Like they say, "don't fix what ain't broke!"
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Old 01-15-2012, 03:34 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by Bigjim68 View Post
I think that a lot of the citrus flavors used in Cambodian, Thai, Vietnamese, and other Siamese countries comes from Kaffir Lime and Lemongrass rather than from the fruit itself. Neither is easy to come by in my area as spices, but both do well as deck and house plants. Kaffir lime grows around 6 ft high as a pot plant, and has long, very sharp, spikes.
Lemongrass and kaffir lime leaves don't taste much like lemon or lime.

Lime juice us a very common ingredient in Thai and Vietnamese cooking.

I envy your lime tree! I grow lemongrass in my garden but have had to resort to buying lime leaves at Mario Batalis Eataly. They are gorgeous and perfect though and, for some reason, very cheap.
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