"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-18-2008, 11:03 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
The whole thing also depends on humidity levels, too. That's why I rely on weighing my flour.
Drat - I left out "assuming a standard 12% moisture content" didn't I?
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 11:05 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: N.E., Ohio
Posts: 1,644
Usually at the very beginning of baking books, the author will tell you things like whether to dip and sweep or sift and spoon and what size egg to use. It is what I normally do. I know that my digital Salter scale from BB&B was around $50--less the 20% coupon.
__________________

__________________
PieSusan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2008, 11:37 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by PieSusan View Post
Usually at the very beginning of baking books, the author will tell you things like whether to dip and sweep or sift and spoon and what size egg to use. It is what I normally do. I know that my digital Salter scale from BB&B was around $50--less the 20% coupon.
I've had a Salter scale for over 10 years and couldn't live without it. Go for it! You won't be sorry.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 06:07 AM   #14
Head Chef
 
Toots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Austin TX
Posts: 1,580
OK - one more question for you sage scale users : what if the recipe calls for 3 cups of flour and I want to measure it on my scale - how would I convert it? just do the reverse of the advice above (5 oz per measured cup) to come up with the correct weight?

thanks!
__________________
Toots is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 06:41 AM   #15
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 453
Send a message via AIM to Russellkhan
Personally, I always convert using the numbers I get from this site.

BTW, I find it's much easier to work in metric for weights - especially if you ever scale recipes.
__________________
Russ
Russellkhan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 07:54 AM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 15,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toots View Post
OK - one more question for you sage scale users : what if the recipe calls for 3 cups of flour and I want to measure it on my scale - how would I convert it? just do the reverse of the advice above (5 oz per measured cup) to come up with the correct weight?

thanks!
If you allow 5 ounces per cup, your scale measurement would be 15 ounces. Easy as that.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2008, 08:50 PM   #17
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toots View Post
OK - one more question for you sage scale users : what if the recipe calls for 3 cups of flour and I want to measure it on my scale - how would I convert it? just do the reverse of the advice above (5 oz per measured cup) to come up with the correct weight?
Not if you want the right answer!

The unit weight per volume can be different between different flours. For example - if you look at the nutrition information on the side of the flour bag you'll see the "serving size" - which is a unit weight per volume. In the case of a bag of Pillsbury Best AP flour - 1/4 cup = 31 grams. So ... 1 cup would be 124 g = 4.37 oz/cup.

If you want to get a little more accurate, take the weight of the bag (in oz or grams) and divide by the number of servings in the bag and adjust for 1 cup ... in this case, 32 oz / 29 (1/4 cup servings) x 4 (to get 1 cup) = 4.41 oz ... which is what the flour converter that Russellkhan posted a link to comes up with.

If you use an arbitrary number like 5 oz/cup - you will have 12%-14% too much flour (basically about 1/2 cup minus 4 teaspoons too much). If you're going to buy scales to measure flour you might as well get the right answer!
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2008, 08:14 PM   #18
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 375
Quote:
Here's enough info to drive ya' nuts, Toot!

Starting with measuring technique ... assuming AP flour and 1 cup:

1) If you scoop out of the bag (using the measuring cup) and scrape it off on the side of the bag it's about 5+ oz

2) If you scoop out of a cannister (using the measuring cup) and scrape level with a straight edge, about 5 oz

3) If you scoop the flour out of bag/cannister with a spoon and spoon into the measuring cup and level with a straight edge - 4.5 - 4.7 oz

4) If you scoop the flour out of bag/cannister with a spoon and sprinkle it into the measuring cup and level with a straight edge - 4.0 - 4.5 oz

5) If you sift the flour into the measuring cup - 3-3.5 oz

6) If you shake, bump or thump the cup to level it - it will weigh more than if you don't.

There is also a difference between regions. AP flour in Canada and the Northern US regional flours tend to weight more than National US brands which weigh more than Southen US regional brands. Shirley Corriher mentions this in her book Cookwise.

The type of flour also makes a difference in weight per unit volume.

Glad I could help simplify this for you!
The moral of the story is that you should buy a cheap kitchen scale and do things the correct way, by mass. Volume measurement is just wrong.
__________________
jasonr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 05:43 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 337
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonr View Post
The moral of the story is that you should buy a cheap kitchen scale and do things the correct way, by mass. Volume measurement is just wrong.
Hi JasonR,

The moral of the story is to find a recipe which has a consistency of measurement through all ingredients.

Thus, the recipe needs to be written in cups, ounces or grammes. A mixture of weights is a recipe to be avoided. A US pint is 16 fl oz and a UK pint 20 fl oz - lots of potential for error here.

For example, a white sauce, for a pouring consistency would be:

1 oz butter
1 oz flour
20 fl oz milk

and for a coating consistency:
2 oz butter
2 oz flour
20 fl oz milk

Hope this helps,

Archiduc
__________________

__________________
archiduc is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.