"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-14-2008, 11:04 PM   #111
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Fried Peanutbutter and 'Nanner Sammich!

(Elvis is in the house ... again ...)

Take two slices of white bread and lightly toast them, smear one side with mashed banana - the other with peanut butter, put together like a sandwich. Put a pat of buter in a small skillet and "fry" on both sides like you would a grilled cheese sandwich.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 04:39 AM   #112
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Anything fried.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 11:31 AM   #113
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,394
Tasso.......
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 02:04 PM   #114
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post
Hushpuppies. Not the hockey puck hard ones, though. Soooooo good with fried catfish!!!!!!
Is that the same thing as corn fritters?, and do you have a recipe? Thx
__________________
Time is what keeps everything from happening all at once.
Lefty7887 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 07:35 AM   #115
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 6
Y'all are making me hungry!!

How does one make grits exactly?

And is there a southern cookbook with all these in it?
__________________
ImNotReallyaWaitress is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 08:01 AM   #116
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,394
Look for these on your grocers shelf...Cooking directions are on the box, however it's basically 1/2 Cup grits -- 2 Cups water. The box says ready in 5 minutes -- 20-30 minutes is better. The longer they cook the better (creamier) they get...It's Ok to add a little water/milk along as needed! Cook very slowly!! Stirring often.

Have Fun & Enjoy!

__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 08:25 AM   #117
Senior Cook
 
FincaPerlitas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
Posts: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImNotReallyaWaitress View Post
Y'all are making me hungry!!

How does one make grits exactly?

And is there a southern cookbook with all these in it?
One of our DC community members has a great southern cooking website and blog. Check it out: Southern Cooking Like Only Mama Can!

As for southern cookbooks, there are thousands of them. Many are very good, but some are not so good. Also, keep in mind that there are strong regional differences in southern cooking. For a good basic cookbook with clear, well-written explanations of techniques and regional variations as well as great recipes, here are two that I recommend:

The Southern Cook's Handbook by Courtney Taylor: http://www.amazon.com/Southern-Cooks-Handbook-Step-Step/dp/1893062708/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1230901151&sr= 8-2

The Gift of Southern Cooking by Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock: http://www.amazon.com/Gift-Southern-Cooking-Revelations-American/dp/0375400354/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1230901719&sr= 8-3

The Quaker Quick Grits that Uncle Bob recommended are the most widely distributed national brand and are edible, but not great. Quaker also makes several varieties of "instant grits" which, in my opinion, are not edible and shouldn't be confused with the quick grits.

To me, the best grits are old fashioned stone ground cream style white grits, from a mill in the South. My favorite supermarket brand is Dixie Lily, but they are hard to find at the moment due to a recent sale of the company and their failure, to date, to set up a new distribution network.

Even better, order your grits online from one of the independent small mills. Google "stone ground grits" and take your choice of several. Pick one from the deep south if you want authentic, traditional southern grits.

One such source is Anson Mills, in South Carolina. They offer both yellow and white quick grits and old fashioned (slow-cooking) grits. I prefer old fashioned white grits: http://www.ansonmills.com/products-page.htm
__________________
FincaPerlitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 09:22 AM   #118
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,394
This book has stood the test of time...I would rank it in my 10 "Southern" Books.

Enjoy!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 10:45 AM   #119
Senior Cook
 
FincaPerlitas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: San Jose, Costa Rica, Central America
Posts: 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
This book has stood the test of time...I would rank it in my 10 "Southern" Books.

Enjoy!
I agree. I'm a big fan of Junior League cookbooks. Back in the 70's the Junior League put out a four volume collection of regional cookbooks, compiled from the best recipes in all of the various Junior League cookbooks published up to that time - The Southern, Eastern, Midwestern and Western Junior League Cookbooks. I have the full collection. They are long out of print but used copies are still available. I wish they would come out with updated versions.

Junior League cookbooks are almost invariably compiled with the greatest of care and pride by their members and include priceless heirloom recipes passed down within families and between neighbors and friends. The best of them are very selective and it's considered a great honor by members to have a recipe selected for inclusion.

However, these are recipe collections, not general cookbooks, and if you want to learn to cook Southern food you should still start with a basic cookbook such as those I recommended in my earlier post.
__________________
FincaPerlitas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 10:54 AM   #120
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: N.E., Ohio
Posts: 1,644
sweet tea
__________________

__________________
PieSusan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.