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Old 11-01-2012, 07:04 AM   #21
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also went on a mushroom walk with a local " Mycological club", but it seemed like there were too many uncertainties about which you can eat or cant eat, and trouble identifying them %100, so ill stick to store bought mushrooms ( or the occasional mushroom logs that i buy to grow my own)
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Old 11-01-2012, 07:16 AM   #22
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There is a guy up here in the New York area that has weekend walks in some of the local parks ( including Central Park in NYC). who helps identify everything. He has a website

Foraging With the "Wildman"

He even has a cookbook, identification DVD and other things that he sells.
His website has a lot of info too.

We went on one of his walks, Things that come to mind for me are : Black walnuts, Hen of the Woods mushrooms, Autumn Olive Berries, sassafras leaves for tea, purslane, sumac, cat tails, sorrel . There were many others, i just forgot them, as it was several years ago.
Thank you for the link Wish I could find someone like that here!
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Old 11-01-2012, 08:13 AM   #23
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The walk was very interesting. The guy is a little off-beat, but in a fun and good way. It was educational, and for someone who likes to cook, eat and garden, for me it was great. What is great is that you can go to the same park in different seasons and find totally different things to eat. And being a vegetarian, im always looking for new/ different things to eat.
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Old 11-01-2012, 08:41 AM   #24
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I love purslane, my favourite edible weed so far. It's full of nutrients and is easy to identify.
Our favourite way to eat it is in Purslane omelettes. Fry a cup of chopped leaves and stems with a bit of chopped onion and seasoning. Whisk 6 eggs and pour over. Cook till set. Portion and serve with nice tomato salad. I add some grated cheddar or gouda as well.
Purslane is low growing and has smooth shiny leaves. If you're worried that what you find is not purslane, the easiest way to check is by breaking a stem open. If it doesn't have a milky sap inside the stem you're good to go. Purslane doesn't have a hairy coating either but there are similar looking plants that do. Avoid these.
OMG, that stuff is edible? That is my nemesis throughout the summer even more than crabgrass It sprouts everywhere that grass does not have a good foothold. And with several large gravel areas I am constantly spraying and hoeing it. The way it lays there flat to the ground with its red stems and sprawling outward... well, I just think it's pretty ugly Even now that I know it tastes like cucumbers I don't think I could bring myself to eat it unless there was an emergency.

I didn't realize that Queen's Lace plants were the tops of a carrot either. That one I might try eating.
I've got just about every plant shown here somewhere or another on my property.
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Old 11-01-2012, 11:34 AM   #25
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also went on a mushroom walk with a local " Mycological club", but it seemed like there were too many uncertainties about which you can eat or cant eat, and trouble identifying them %100, so ill stick to store bought mushrooms ( or the occasional mushroom logs that i buy to grow my own)
I "forage" elderberries and the flowers, juniper berries, and gout weed (ground elder) around the condo grounds, but those were all intentionally planted. I have never eaten day lilies, but some species are edible.

You need a good, up-do-date mushroom identifying book to trust mushrooms that you find that you haven't been specifically taught. A good mushroom book will have pix and tell you what else looks like a specific mushroom and ways to be sure which is which, e.g., gill colour and shape, spore colour, etc.

I wrote up-to-date because I used one in the early '80s and it said that the brain mushroom/false morel was safe to eat if it was dried or heated thoroughly. They were really yummy. Research in the '90s has determined that there is a toxin that isn't completely destroyed that way and it is cumulative.
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Old 11-01-2012, 12:30 PM   #26
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I had no idea that was purslane. I'm pretty sure that's the weed in my backyard that's growing in a pot I never got around to planting. I never pulled out of the pot because I was deciding whether or not I wanted to keep it. It's kind neat looking.
We eat purslane, too. Most people (around here anyway) treat it like a weed, but it's quite good for you. Very high in omega-3s.
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Old 11-01-2012, 01:02 PM   #27
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I have done some mushroom foraging over the years, but only with someone who is very experienced. As one friend says, "there are old mushroomers, and there are bold mushroomers. But there are NO old, bold mushroomers.

THAT is purslane? I, too, have thrown it away for years!
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Old 11-01-2012, 02:04 PM   #28
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I saw someone use Purslane on the food channel once, looked it up ( since i had never heard of it) and like most of you,discovered it was something ive been weeding out of the garden for years. Its a little tangy, and has a little bit of that okra slime to it.
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Old 11-01-2012, 02:10 PM   #29
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We eat purslane, too. Most people (around here anyway) treat it like a weed, but it's quite good for you. Very high in omega-3s.
I love the stuff! Young leaves in salads, leaves and chopped stalks in omelettes and stir fry and the slight okra like sap makes it a good thickener in soups and stew. My kids like dipping it in mayo

I've heard that if you boil purslane the water can be used as an egg substitute in baking. Haven't tried it yet though.
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Old 11-01-2012, 02:26 PM   #30
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The nemesis of every one who want a perfect lawn. Dandelion greens. For years the Italians in this area used to go out to the highways and dig them up from the median strips in the middle of the roads. Too many folks getting hit by cars, so they put a stop to it. Now they stick to lawns. If they see that you have a lot of them on your lawn, they will knock on your door and ask if they can dig them up.

Another one is Fiddleheads. They grow along the banks of streams. Again the Italians will go into the woods and harvest them. Get enough and they sell them to the supermarkets. Very pricey.
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