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Old 08-09-2010, 10:35 PM   #21
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In these parts we use frogs for bait. I wouldn't eat these any more than I would eat crickets or nightcrawlers.

YUCK

.40
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Old 08-10-2010, 06:26 AM   #22
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I have never tried frogs legs because I was brought up to not like them. Now that I am learning how to eat I thought about it once or twice about trying them.
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Old 08-12-2010, 02:06 PM   #23
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Come now. Any muscle tissue will "twitch" when you apply an electrical charge to it. And all protein reacts to heat by tightening up. In the case of frogs legs, they are simply small enough that the whole leg is intact, and so when heat affects the proteins, the leg may appear to twitch. If you were to cook an intact leg of beef, I suspect you'd get a similar reaction. And as stated by others, if the frogs legs have been frozen previously, then they act like any other meat.
The idea that the meat can't be good because it comes from a frog. No one things twice about eating turtle, or crab. And yet, crabs are very similar to spiders. I mean, muscle tissue is simply that, whether it comes from the leg of a frog, or cow, or pig, or quail. The meat is made of carbon, in the form of DNA, RNA, sugars, cholesterol, and other substances. It doesn't matter what kind of animal it's in. I do have to admit that there are meats I would have a hard time eating, such as dog, or cat, because I've attached emotional significance to them. But from a purely logical viewpoint, there is no reason that we can't eat everything from scorpions to elephant, to rat, to a perfectly marbled bone-in rib streak. And remember, in many parts of the world, humans eat many things that we in North America turn our noses up at.

Frog legs are delicious when cooked properly, whether they twitch or not.
If you are willing to expand your culinary viewpoint, then you will be able to experience a wonderful world of flavors.
Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 08-12-2010, 02:21 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Goodweed of the North View Post
I do have to admit that there are meats I would have a hard time eating, such as dog, or cat, because I've attached emotional significance to them. But from a purely logical viewpoint, there is no reason that we can't eat everything from scorpions to elephant, to rat, to a perfectly marbled bone-in rib streak. And remember, in many parts of the world, humans eat many things that we in North America turn our noses up at.

Frog legs are delicious when cooked properly, whether they twitch or not.
If you are willing to expand your culinary viewpoint, then you will be able to experience a wonderful world of flavors.
Seeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
Agreed, however, I also have an attached emotional significance to certain types of food...it's called revulsion. I suppose if I was starving I could eat frogs legs and spoiled cabbage, I mean sauerkraut. But! I am not starving and I would prefer NOT to eat these items. And I have no problem saying so.

I am very adventurous when it comes to trying different foods, but I do have to draw the line somewhere. Frogs is it!
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Old 08-12-2010, 02:21 PM   #25
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Come now.
hmmmm, GW, I'm one of those who think food is something to be enjoyed and not to be taken all that seriously. I was just having some fun, "it's who I am"
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Old 08-12-2010, 03:00 PM   #26
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I agree, food should be enjoyed. Being playful with food can be great. And I certainly am not one who states that anyone has to eat anything. Food choices is a personal thing. If the idea of eating frogs legs is repulsive, then don't eat them. I do encourage people to eat new things though. My thinking is, if you never try anything new, you will never know whether you like that thing you avoid. I enjoy my food through all of my senses, even touch.

When I was a kid, when my Mom would make fried chicken, we'd eat it with our fingers. I used to take my forefinger and thumb, and pinch them together while sliding them across each other. It created a unique experience as the viscosity of the oil would partially negate the normal skin friction. The fingers would create a sound as the skin caught and released. I found the sensation interesting and experimented with it. My Mom would get tired if my distraction and tell me to quit playing with my food. Unknown to her or me, I was learning about friction, and how lubricants worked. I also have also been a person who savored my food, exploring the flavors and smells I experienced. I didn't learn to "wolf" down my food until adulthood, and the demands of our American work ethic forced me to inhale what I ate. But when eating a meal where I have time to enjoy it, I eat slowly. And I always have set up my plate so that I ate my least favorite foods first, saving the favorite foods to create the perfect last bite.

This has been an interesting thread in that it has reminded me that we all have different desires where food is concerned. And, we are all unique. As the cliche states, one man's trash is another man's treasure, and vice-versa. So, enjoy your food, in whatever way is right for you.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 08-12-2010, 05:40 PM   #27
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~~swinging legs~~
"...ribbit, ribbit... hmm, me thinks can jump high, shoot long tongue, and catch me them two juicy worms dangling from tree branch... ribbit... yummy good protein, my thighs make thicker than Serena Williams'... ribbit"

In second grade, I was nicknamed 'frog legs' for my dodgeball skills. I like them, dusted and pan-fried with salt and liberal black pepper; there's lots of meat on the little suckers. Being grossed out is part of the fun of eating! A kid will get excited by the announcement that we're having worms for dinner tonight.
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:00 PM   #28
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"...ribbit, ribbit... hmm, me thinks can jump high, shoot long tongue, and catch me them two juicy worms dangling from tree branch... ribbit... yummy good protein, my thighs make thicker than Serena Williams'... ribbit"

In second grade, I was nicknamed 'frog legs' for my dodgeball skills. I like them, dusted and pan-fried with salt and liberal black pepper; there's lots of meat on the little suckers. Being grossed out is part of the fun of eating! A kid will get excited by the announcement that we're having worms for dinner tonight.
My legs may be as pallid as worms, but they are definitely bigger than worms. You'd be eating for weeks on those!
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Old 08-18-2010, 05:18 PM   #29
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Wow this thread really interested me because I have never tried frog legs and didn't know that so many people like them! Can you just buy them from the local market? I'm assuming they aren't sold in most stores.
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Old 08-21-2010, 12:08 AM   #30
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In my younger days I used to gig my own frogs. Then, I bought them at the Market. I started reading the labels. A lot came from India. Did they come from the Ganges river? Remember the "ghats". Funeral pyres fueled with wood. Wood is expensive in India. The poor cannot afford enough wood to entirely cremate a body, thus the singed bodies are set adrift to float ashore where they are feasted upon by dogs. I won't chance eating a frog leg that even MIGHT have originated from the Ganges River.
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