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Old 03-29-2005, 11:54 AM   #1
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Fusion Cooking

I really like to mix and match flavors from various cuisines. Does anyone know if there is a good site or books I can consult on this.

I am not into Ming Tsai (East meets West) but others if anyone has any suggestions. I would also appreciate any fusion recipes that people can share.

Thanks very much in advance for sharing.

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Old 03-29-2005, 01:31 PM   #2
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Yakuta, I know next to nothing about fusion cooking, but when I googled it, this site came up: http://www.geocities.com/fusioncooking/It looks like it has a lot of recipes on it.
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Old 03-29-2005, 01:39 PM   #3
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I immediately thought of Blue Ginger, but you say no Ming ...

What cusines, specifically, interest you and/or what turns you off from Ming?
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Old 03-29-2005, 01:49 PM   #4
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Thanks PABaker for the site I will check it out. Jennyema, I have gone through Ming's recipes and most of them are focused more on Asian.

Are there any that mix other cuisines together Latin and Italian for example, Italian, French and Latin. Carribean and Western influences, East European with Asian flavors.

It seems like I don't see much in the fusion area other than Ming. I just wanted to see if there is anything else out there that I may have overlooked. .
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Old 03-29-2005, 02:05 PM   #5
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Yakuta, if you look at geographical areas, you can almost always find 'fusions' of cuisine; Basque cooking, for example, is often a fusion of Italian and Spanish cooking, with its own little twists that have been added in over the centuries. Very northern Italian cooking has elements of Germanic foods; French 'provincial' foods often have more in common with their mediterranean neighbors than what we consider traditional 'french cuisine'.

For other examples, look to the Creole cuisine of the southern US - a fusion of the French and Caribbean ancestory. There's a wonderful cookbook author, Jessica Harris, who puts in amazing perspective the cooking of the Americas; from the 'slave' cuisine as it developed in the southern states, to all of the wonderful food of all the Caribbean countries, and where it came from and how it developed.

Look also to the 'fusion' of the Hawaiian foods; what a wealth of culture they've drawn on - Chinese, Japanese, Polynesion, Portuguese - to make some of the most delicious food in the world!

If you look at a map of Asia, with its countries and cuisine, you can see how foods have travelled from one country to another, with each country adapting and adopting to make it their own - take Japanese 'curry', for example!
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Old 03-29-2005, 02:11 PM   #6
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I don't know the exact titles of their books, but you should be able to find one online from the following chefs:

Roy Yamaguchi
Alan Wong
Sam Choy
Gary Danko
Thomas Keller
Rob Feenie

The first three on the list lean more towards the Asian side and the last three on the list lean more towards the European side, but all six incorpate "Eurasian" recipes in their books and menus.

The two main types of fusion cooking include the following:

Latin Fusion (Mexican, Cuban, and Caribbean mostly)
Asian Fusion

There are other smaller branches of fusion cooking, but they usually include one or both of the above, and almost always include ingredients from one or both of the above.
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Old 03-29-2005, 02:51 PM   #7
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I was thinking Basque and Provancal ....

Or ...

I have seen this book and heard gfood things about it but dont have it
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/IS...013045-6379862
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Old 03-29-2005, 03:56 PM   #8
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Marmalady, ironchef and jennyema thank you for all the wonderful information. I have a lot to sift through now. In addition to Ming the only other familiar name in the list is Roy. I believe he has a restaurant chain called Roy's. The one that I visited in San Francisco was packed and the food was very creative. I will check all of these out. thanks again.
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Old 03-29-2005, 05:30 PM   #9
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For great fusion foods, look to the Phillipinnes. They were ruled for many, many years by the Spanish, who left their mark on the already wonderful tropical cuisine.

If you want a very good, Americanized version of the classic egg-roll, let me know and I'll post my modified recipe, with the pineapple sweet and sour sauce to go with it. It is not like any egg roll you have had, and is definetly not filled with American ingredients. It just has a better texture, and flavor than what is traditionally presented in the restaurants. I haven't yet found anyone who doesn't love them.

Seeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 03-29-2005, 07:12 PM   #10
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Yes Goodweed please share your recipe. I don't eat pork but I always find ways of substituting that meat with others.


Thank you for sharing your cherished recipe I am sure it will be good as all the others you have shared.
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