"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-14-2011, 05:55 PM   #11
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Moss Beach, California
Posts: 67
I'm not pushing. I never want to force them to eat anything they don't like. I just need ideas!

I have a thousand food ideas for food I like for me but for him, it's harder and I feel terrible serving him chicken, peas and rice again and again.

Costco has the lump crab from memory..... I think crab cakes might be a hit. If not, the husband will like them.

The "California Roll" noodle bowl probably won't work as it has mayo in it.......
__________________

__________________
spiceoflife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 06:29 PM   #12
Cupcake
 
Kathleen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Mid-Atlantic, USA
Posts: 2,315
You may want to try mini-crab cakes. One of my nieces was such a picky eater. Her issue was with anything that she had to chew - with the exception of grapes. She did not like things that were too hot or cold - which included ice cream! Fruit yogurt smoothies were a hit as was pudding. So were mini-sized foods. Like she would eat things that were bite-sized. Steam-crisped and cooled veggies cut in matchstick fries or in flower shapes, she would eat. Same with cheese that were cut in pennies. She did not like butter or other greasy textures, but she loved pasta sprinkled with Kraft Parmesan. Serving the real stuff did not fly.

She also liked small rice balls like one would get in a Japanese restaurant - especially when decorated or in a cool shape. As she got older, as others mentioned, having her help pick out what she would take to lunch and create it, encouraged her to eat better. Until then, there was a lot of Kraft Mac N Cheese that filled her tummy.....as long as no butter was used and the milk was skimmed. And bite-sized, shaped food.


__________________

__________________
A little bit Ginger. A little bit Mary Ann.
Kathleen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 08:00 PM   #13
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Moss Beach, California
Posts: 67
I'm thinking the shaped food is a great idea. I saw a nice recipe for rice balls that had chicken in them. Yes I agree on the dislike of anything greasy.

We do fruit smoothies fairly often. It is the big old skeleton drinking straws that help there. Also, all food in the frog bowl tastes a little better.

Mini-crab cakes, got it!
__________________
spiceoflife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 08:17 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by spiceoflife View Post
My youngest son (3 years old) is a real picky eater. Even when I am reading a food magazine and I will say to him, mmmmm this looks super yummy, he will reply "I don't like that, it looks yucky". So I know half the battle is presentation. But I'm running out of ideas.


He likes breaded fish, but no other fish. He likes chicken. Likes ground beef. Loves fruit. Fave veges are asparagus, fresh artichoke, broccoli and peas. Loves eggs.

Dislikes cooked tomatoes or tomato based sauces. Hates butter, pork, most cheese but cheese sauce is OK. Will not eat anything with even a hint of spice. The only potato he will eat is chips or french fries. Neither is a health option.

If he had it his way, he'd live on scrambled eggs, fruit and plain pasta.
He actually has diverse tastes compared to my daughter! I haven't read the other suggestions so sorry if I'm repeating something someone else suggested ... you could try a wrap with a tortilla and some broccoli and chicken, since he likes eggs maybe a quiche type thing with broccoli? Or a broccoli and chicken casserole (like chicken divan). You could do a creative taco with ground beef and veggies or a breakfast burrito with chicken and eggs.

Honestly though I gave up on pleasing my kids at dinner time. I give them what they want (within reason) for breakfast and lunch, but I cook for me and my husband at dinner time. I usually serve some kind of filler (like bread) that they will eat, but if they don't want the rest of it that's their choice. They always have the option of drinking a glass of milk if they're still hungry, but they don't get to refuse dinner and then go help themselves to snack type stuff. I figure with this plan (approved by my pediatrician) eventually they will open up to trying different things (and I cook a really broad variety of foods at dinner time). Hasn't happened yet, though, LOL!
__________________
I'm cooking one meal from every nation on Earth: travelbystove.blogspot.com.
GiddyUpGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 08:26 PM   #15
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Moss Beach, California
Posts: 67
I hear you about giving up on pleasing them. If I have enough on my "go to" list, when I'm really stuck I can look at it (physical list in the kitchen) and run with something that is nutritious, easy and tastes good.

Love the idea of the tortillas. Last time we had soft tacos my 5 year old piled anything and everything onto his and the 3 year old ate plain tortillas. Maybe I am just over thinking it.

Cooked ground beef in a non-tomato sauce. Freeze small kiddy portions and then the next time the rest of the family dives in for diverse soft tacos, I can pull out some non-offending protein for him. I like the chicken/egg idea too.

I just want him to eat more than a plain tortilla.

Thanks guys, this is great.
__________________
spiceoflife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 09:22 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,318
My mother fed us in the kitchen about an hour before my parents ate in the dining room. We often had toasted cheese sandwiches (openfaced under the broiler), canned corn, macaroni and cheese, and, my one bro's and my favorite--saltines, hardboiled eggs, and spinach. We didn't eat with our parents except on holidays (if you call being at the kiddie table eating with them). She served us a lot of canned soup. Mind you, she always hated to cook and until we moved to a house that didn't have space in the kitchen to feed us first (and put us to bed), we didn't eat with them. I was 7 when we moved and the youngest.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 11:00 PM   #17
Executive Chef
 
Timothy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: St. Augustine, Florida
Posts: 2,491
I've worked with a lot of very poor people. In the families that I worked with who were literally starving, I never saw a child who was a picky eater at any age. They ate anything that was food and got near them, and they loved it all.

My belief is that picky eating is a learned trait. Learned from other children usually or from a parent who is a picky eater themselves, or as a means to gain attention. I mean no insult to anyone by saying this, but I really do feel this is true.

In my home when I was a child, the plates were stacked at my Dad's place and he served every person at the table. He put a reasonable portion of each item that was cooked on every plate and the plate was passed to each person, starting with my Mom at the other end of the table.

We were allowed to leave the table when our plates were empty unless we were sick.
__________________
Confirmed Sushi Addict
Timothy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 11:10 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
babetoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: escondido, calif. near san diego
Posts: 14,349
i agree with tim. in my growing up family, we were required to have at least a small spoon of each item served. we knew it was a rule and we did not violate it. i did the same thing with my children. no picky eaters at all!!
__________________
"life isn't about how to survive the storm but how to dance in the rain"
babetoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2011, 11:46 PM   #19
Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Moss Beach, California
Posts: 67
We vacuum food in this house. Just the little guy is picky. Elder son eats like a demon. 3/4 of us are non-picky.

I'm the youngest of 6 and my parents ran the family like an army boot camp. I hated it and did not want a large family (not enough parent to go around, I was raised by siblings) nor the extreme I felt our family had. Searching for a happy medium is what I aim for.

For what it is worth, food did not go down well tonight (not crab cakes but teriyaki chicken) so he went without. The rest of us ate.
__________________
spiceoflife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2011, 06:57 AM   #20
Executive Chef
 
Timothy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: St. Augustine, Florida
Posts: 2,491
Quote:
Originally Posted by spiceoflife View Post
We vacuum food in this house. Just the little guy is picky. Elder son eats like a demon. 3/4 of us are non-picky.

I'm the youngest of 6 and my parents ran the family like an army boot camp. I hated it and did not want a large family (not enough parent to go around, I was raised by siblings) nor the extreme I felt our family had. Searching for a happy medium is what I aim for.

For what it is worth, food did not go down well tonight (not crab cakes but teriyaki chicken) so he went without. The rest of us ate.
Please know that I worried all night last night that what I said might have been taken wrong, and have insulted someone. I sure didn't mean it to have done this. Please accept my apology if I sounded harsh or impolite. I meant no harm or insult to anyone. It upsets me greatly when I feel I might have mistakenly done that.

I know I've had periods where maybe I had a stomach upset and food just didn't taste good or seem appetizing to me for several days. Perhaps that's what the little guy is going through. A well pureed veggie soup with no seasonings usually goes down well and helps me get through those times.

I always keep several quarts of homemade veggie soup base in the freezer. I use it in a lot of dishes.

Children have "perfect" taste buds. No smokers, no tobacco chewers, no beer drinkers...just pristine taste buds that may taste food many times more powerfully than thier adult counterparts. What may be moderately seasoned food to you might be overwhelming to a child. Especially with salt or things that have adult strength seasoning with soy sauce or other spices.

Just a thought. I've known families that took the children's portions out of the pot after applying half of the intended seasonings and leaving some, like hot sauce, out. Then they put the remainder of the seasonings in for the adults.

Or, your 3 year old might just be in one of those "not feeling good" times that all children go through during that incredible time of super fast growth in their little bodies and minds.

Even with my vocabulary, experience and education, I sometimes have a problem expressing a body problem I'm having. Tiny children must find it especially frustrating at times and may express it as crying or refusing foods or contact.

If nutrition becomes a worry because of food refusal, it may be a wise choice to seek the child's Doctor's advice. Real food allergies might be coming into play.
__________________

__________________
Confirmed Sushi Addict
Timothy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.